Lesson Plan: The Sustainable Food Choices

Written By: Lisa Boerboom

Time Allotment

1-5 class periods (or more) depending on options chosen

Overview

This unit includes an excellent video series on current food/consumer topics. Teachers many choose specific episodes or let students make selections based on their personal interest. A variety of assignment options are included for students to complete as they watch the videos and the culminating activity will have students create a comic strip to illustrate their understanding of the topics. TheSustainableFoodChoicesLesson.docx

Learning Objectives

  1. Define the terms sustainability and conservation
  2. Identify steps a consumer should take to purchase and then promote the use of sustainable food products.
  3. Identify the issues surrounding the global production of seafood, coffee, animals and organic food

Materials

  1. Students set up a document to use for their notes and vocabulary chart
  2. Set up a classroom discussion platform to use for formative assessment
    • google classroom, peardeck, infuse learning, padlet, twitter, etc…..

Introductory Activities

MATERIALS: http://www.foodday.org//food_literacy_quiz
Food Day quiz is used as the introductory activity. The short, 15 question quiz will get students to connect to their previous knowledge.

Learning Activities

View video episodes from the Lexicon of Sustainability series
  1. Students or teacher choose from the following activities or focus questions for each video clip. Students organize their responses in a document.
    • Create questions that stimulate discussion
    • List the arguments one could state to oppose this idea
    • List examples of this topic from your life experience
    • What is the main idea
    • Why is this segment important?
    • What is your opinion of this segment?
    • What questions would you ask the main speaker if given the opportunity to interview them?
  2. Vocabulary
  3. Use a similar format as students create a vocabulary chart in their notes. Teacher may choose to discuss some key terms before viewing the episodes. List of terms is included: http://www.pbs.org/food/features/the-lexicon-of-sustainability-terms/
    Term Define in your own words use term in a sentence self, school, or world connections

  4. Possible class discussion questions to use throughout the unit as formative assessment.
    • What was your score on the pretest? Name one topic you feel confident about.
    • On a scale of 1-5 how strongly do you agree with the speaker
    • List three things you have learned so far in class today
    • Choose the vocabulary term from your list that you identify most with a given picture
    • You have 5 minutes to locate an image from the Lexicon of sustainability website that you feels illustrates Sustainability in the most broad and complete way.
    • What are the consequences of…..?
    • Do you think _____ is a good thing or a bad thing?
    • What happened after________?
    • What was the problem with _______?

Culminating Activity

  • Students will create a comic strip to illustrate their understanding of the concepts in the unit. This summative assessment encourages higher level thinking and creativity.
  • Students will share their completed comic strip with a partner or small group. Discussion points will be earned based on the quality of the questions they ask the presenters.

  • Comic strip summative assessment

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. Prepare food that meets sustainability guidelines.
    2. Create art that illustrates sustainability concepts.

    Community Connections

    1. Interview local producers or others in the food industry to learn more about their sustainable initiatives.
    2. Post comic strips on the class blog to promote discussion.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Die Blaue Reiter und Die Brücke (The Blue Rider and The Bridge)

    Written By: MELANIE ENGEL UNGER

    Time Allotment

    4-5 50 minute class periods

    Overview

    • Students will take a virtual tour through the Lenbachhaus, a museum focused on Expressionist art, in Munich, Germany, to learn about the Expressionist Movement.
    • Students will identify Expressionist art.
    • Students will critique examples of Expressionist art.
    • Students will create their own art piece in Expressionist style.
    The_Blue_Rider_Melanie_Unger.docx

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to describe the Expressionist art movement in Germany.
    • Students will be able to identify the forces of the movement that relate to the social and political climate of the time period.
    • Students will be able to identify and critique examples of Expressionist art.
    • Students will demonstrate understanding of the principles of Expressionist art by creating their own example of Expressionist art.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Digital Multimedia Program: Emaze
    Websites:
    1. Virtual museum tour of the Lenbachhaus in Munich, Germany Lenbachhaus Blaue Reiter
    2. Paintings of the Brandenburg Gate in various artistic styles
      • Brandenburg Gate 1790-1830 Brandenburg Gate 1790-1830
      • Brandenburg Gate 1812 Brandenburg Gate 1812
      • Brandenburg Gate 1929 Brandenburg Gate 1929
      • Source: PBS LearningMedia

    Video:
    1. Video (10 minutes) Expressionism – The video shows many examples of Expressionist art as well as gives a description and explanation of the movement itself. I would narrate the film rather than using the narration provided. (see Film Notes)

    2. Source: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dD5G9ZJFS9A&index=1&list=PL1qz-Hj9PBu-aWCbxP2xEsMifYC4YCRxc
    3. Video (9 minutes) Painting Movements Part XI Expressionism by Dr. Muth Omar – The video is not narrated, but is accompanied by The Blue Danube Waltz which seems a very strange choice. Once again, I would narrate the video.

    4. Source: YouTube: https://youtu.be/OZ0fH-zOkZI
    5. Video (57 minutes) Portions of PBS Art of the Western World Segments 8 and 9

    6. Source: PBS Annenberg Media, Art of the Western World Segments 8 and 9

      Materials

    7. PLD’s – 1 per student
    8. Paints, brushes and canvas/paper – 1 set per student
    9. Introductory Activities

      Write a detailed narrative description of activities, discussions, or media-integrated exercises that introduce the lesson, direct students to targeted concepts or objectives, and introduce the lesson vocabulary. Divide each component of the Introductory Activity into numbered steps.
      Day One
      1. Artistic Movements or Periods – Using the multimedia program Emaze, I will show examples of art the students will likely be familiar with such as Graffiti Art and Anime, followed by a few examples from the Gothic, Classical, Realism and Romantic periods. (10 minutes)
      2. Expressionism – The discussion will then turn to what was going on in Germany in the beginning years of the 20th century, for example, imperial resistance to modern ideas, the bourgeois patronage of artists, the events leading to WWI and WWII. Examples of Expressionist art will be shown and students will give their reactions. The basic ideas of the genre, raw emotion, feelings, abstraction, use of color, etc., will be discussed. (15-20 minutes)
      3. Groups – Two groups of Expressionist painters, die Blaue Reiter and die Brücke, will be introduced. Where each group was located, Munich and Dresden respectively, how they lived and worked, as well as how the groups set themselves apart, allowing women to join, for example, will be discussed. (10 minutes)
      4. Video – Students will then view the video Expressionism. They will be instructed to choose a favorite or outstanding example of artwork shown in the film. (10 minutes)

      5. An alternative to using the video named above would be to use portions taken from PBS Art of the Western World Sections 8 and 9 or Painting Movements Section XI Expressionism by Dr. Muth Omar.

        Learning Activities

        Day Two
      6. Identify examples of Expressionism – Students will be shown examples of artwork depicting the same subject, the Brandenburg Gate for one example, but were painted in different styles. The students will pick out the Expressionist work and be able to explain why it falls into that movement. (10 minutes)
      7. Exploration – Students will search images of artwork by members of either Die Blaue Reiter or Die Brücke, Franz Marc, Wassily Kandinsky or Paul Klee, for example. They will choose a favorite, outstanding or disturbing example to share with the class. Students will use Google Slides to present the image. They will not only explain why they chose this example, but why the example is considered Expressionist art. (30 minutes)
      8. Preparation for culminating activity – Students will take, bring in or find a photo (must be a photo) of just about anything, but preferably something living and animated for class the next day. (10 minutes)
      9. Day Three
      10. Presentation – Students will share their choice of artwork including the artist, his/her group, why they chose it and why it is an example of Expressionist art. (20 minutes)
      11. Students will begin the culminating activity
      12. Culminating Activity

        Day Four
      13. Creating Expressionist Art – Students will have the entire hour to complete their painting. They will paint the image in their photo, but in Expressionist style, meaning they will attempt to paint how the image in the photo makes them feel and what emotions it evokes. A very intentional distinction will be made between other artistic periods (more realistic images, trying to exactly reproduce an image) and Expressionism (abstraction, bold, often garish use of color, heavy, dark lines, etc.). When finished, they will mount their work, name it and hang it in the hallway.
      14. Closure – As students are finishing and hanging their work, I will speak with individuals about their paintings to find out why they chose the subject, how they came up with a title and what makes it Expressionist art.

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      Students will be able to make connections in European History, Art, and any course where artistic movements in music, literature or architecture are addressed.

      Community Connections

      Students could potentially add their artwork to an existing art portfolio.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Rain Sticks

    Written By: Sue Anderson

    Time Allotment

    1 lesson: approximately 1 hour per lesson over a 2 period allotment

    Overview

    Rain sticks were believed to be invented by the Aztecs and were played in the belief that it could bring about rain storms. A rain stick is a percussion instrument that when shaken, sounds similar to a rattle or the maracas. Students will incorporate art with the study of another culture, acquire a deeper knowledge of the traditions of Mexico, and create a 3-D rain stick that makes a sound reminiscent of rain. Sue_Anderson_Rain_Stick_Lesson_Plan.docx

    Learning Objectives

    • Be able to create a hands-on 3-D rain stick
    • Study the history of the rain stick and the cultures they come from
    • Study the effects of rain in Science
    • Read, “Who Likes Rain” by Wong Herbert Yee and write a reaction paper in Reading class

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • THE RAIN PROJECT – Create a Book About Rain. With a little investigation, children will come to appreciate and learn about rain in new and different ways: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/arct14.pre.artproject/rain-project/
  • DRAGONFLY TV CACTUS VIDEO – The study of the cactus along with Science: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/fd6d153f-d941-49c6-b4cf-7e564e51967c/fd6d153f-d941-49c6-b4cf-7e564e51967c/
  • THE SCIENCE OF SOUND – The physics of sound, lesson plans. Science, human biology and sound waves. Social Studies, cultural awareness. Writing, reflective, informational: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/soundandfury/lesson2.html
  • HOW TO PLAY THE RAIN STICK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXLP6z8B0i4
  • RAINSTICK – ABORIGINAL MUSICAL INSTRUMENT: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRrri6bTDCw
  • The Ancient Mayans had “rain-makers”, Native American tribes of the Southwestern United States are known for performing elaborate rain dances. Science uses the latest technology with the Global Precipitation Measurement satellite. See link below: http://climatekids.nasa.gov/rainstick/
  • Materials

    1. Paper towel rolls
    2. White glue
    3. Rice and beans in pre allotted cups
    4. Aluminum foil
    5. Multi colored construction paper pre traced in 3” circle shapes
    6. Brown craft paper pre-cut into 8”x5” pieces
    7. Pencils and erasers
    8. Scissors, and rulers
    9. Rubber Bands
    10. Markers or color crayons
    11. “Who Likes Rain” by Wong Herbert Yee
    12. Examples of rain sticks if available
    13. Bright colored feathers and beads for decoration (optional)

    Teacher Preparation

    • Computer
    • Avervision (document camera)
    • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
    • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
    • Screen or wall to project images
    • Art materials and supplies ready
    • Paper pre-cut and beans pre-measured out
    • Handouts on step by step rain stick directions

    Introductory Activities

    1. Students will be shown various power points, images, examples and explain how the rain stick works
    2. Students will be shown various patterns and symbol ideas for decoration
    3. Students will be given step by step rain stick demonstration and construction guidance
    4. Students will be read the story, “Who Likes Rain” by Wong Herbert Yee
    5. Students will identify the main idea of the text, and talk with others about the important details of what they read

    Learning Activities

    1. Instruct students on cutting the pre-traced circles and how they will be used on the ends of the paper towel rolls with rubber bands
    2. Hand out the paper towel rolls and the colored circles for students to start
    3. Demonstrate that after cutting out the circles, students will glue one circle to an end of the paper towel roll
    4. Instruct the students on how to wrap the rubber bands around the glued circle end to keep it secure
    5. Hand out the rubber bands for student use and assist where necessary
    6. Instruct the students on how the aluminum foil will be used in the paper towel rolls, and why you make it swirled
    7. Hand out the aluminum foil pieces to use inside of the paper towel rolls
    8. Distribute rice and bean mixture and instruct the students on how their rice and beans will be poured inside the paper towel roll
    9. Have students cut and glue the other colored circle to the other end of the paper towel roll and secure with another rubber band
    10. While paper towel roll is drying, instruct the students on patterns they can draw on their large colored paper to cover up the brown part of the paper towel roll
    11. Hand out the large colored pieces of paper and instruct the students on how they will glue the paper onto the paper towel rolls when finished decorating

    Culminating Activity

    After creating the hands-on art work assignment, the student will be able to:
    1. (Visual Art)
      • Display their finished art work within their school
      • Share their art piece with their peers. Assess the merits of their own artwork, and the artwork of others
    2. (Social Studies)
      • Identify the location/region studied or represented on a map.
      • Explain how the native people used plants and cactus indigenous to their region in creating their rain sticks
    3. (Music)
      • Create a hand percussion instrument and study the history of rattles
      • Participate in a mock group ceremonial rain dance
      • Play various rain dance songs and have the class analyze their interpretation
    4. (Literature)
      • Students will read the book “Who Likes Rain” by Wong Herbert Yee, and write a brief reaction from their viewpoint on the story after creating their own artistic rain stick
    5. (Math)
      • Use a variety of strategies to solve design problems
      • Use various tools to measure straight rows and patterns for designing

    Cross-Curricular Activity

  • Science – Investigate the physics of sound
  • Math – Discuss patterns and repetition in design
  • Language Arts – Write to understand and improve comprehension
  • Social Studies – Study climates and characteristics of significant features of other cultural regions
  • Music – Research South American hand percussion instruments
  • Community Connections

    • Invite parents and family to join the class for a gallery show of the student artwork
    • Display the art at a local library or business
    • Visit with local science, art and music teachers in your district. Compare findings

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Plagiarism: Do’s & Don’ts

    Written By: Ms. Brittany Lazur

    Time Allotment

    5 50-minute class periods.

    Overview

    Students explore various types of plagiarism through a guided webquest activity. Then, the class looks at examples of student work in a mock plagiarism board activity. The culminating activity is the creation of an infographic that informs readers of the do’s and don’ts of plagiarism. Media-–-Rich-Lesson-Plan.doc

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to:
    • Determine what plagiarism is and what it is not
    • Identify forms of plagiarism
    • Use piktochart.com to create a visually-appealing infographic that synthesizes what they have learned about plagiarism

    Media Components - Video/Web

    • PBS Learning Media: www.pbslearningmedia.org. This website has the video that introduces the plagiarism board activity, and it also allows for easy formative assessment quizzes to check student understanding.
    • QR Codes: QR Codes are incorporated into the webquest activity. Students must scan the codes to be directed to the sites where they can find answers to the worksheet.
    • Daily Infographic: www.dailyinfographic.com. This website uploads a new infographic every day. It is an excellent database of infographic examples in a variety of categories.
    • Piktochart: www.piktochart.com. Piktochart is a free website with an easy-to-use interface that allows students to create their own infographics.

    Materials

    • Computer for teacher along with projection capabilities
    • Computers/tablet for each student
    • Webquest Worksheet
    • Plagiarism Board Assignment Sheet
    • Infographic Assignment Sheet
    • What is an infographic? Presentation & Guided Notes

    Teacher Preparation

    • Familiarize yourself with infographics (I recommend spending an hour or so on dailyinfographic.com to see some examples) and with piktochart.com.
    • Review activities.
    • Review school’s plagiarism policy, if it exists.
    • Copy worksheets listed above.

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Begin class with a free-write on the essential question, “What is plagiarism? What is not plagiarism?” Allow students 5 minutes to write.
    2. Utilize a think-pair-share method to incite discussion about plagiarism. Ask probing questions during the share part of the discussion. Appropriate questions could include questions such as, “What if I reword my source? Is that plagiarism?” and “How can I avoid plagiarism?”
      • NOTE: It is important at this point in time to only ask the probing questions. Do not answer them yourself.
    3. Introduce the mini-unit to students. Explain that we will be taking an in-depth look at what plagiarism is and isn’t, as well as what steps they can take to avoid committing it themselves.

    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS: Webquest Worksheet, student tablet/computer, Plagiarism Board Activity Worksheets, What is an Infographic Guided Notes, What is an Infographic Presentation
    Day 1
    1. Pass out the webquest worksheet to students. If your students will be using a tablet, demonstrate how to use a QR reader to scan the image, which will send them where they need to go in order to answer the worksheet’s questions. Point out that the URLs are included if something goes haywire with the QR codes or if you are using computers.
    2. Allow time for students to work through the webquest. I allow students to work with their shoulder partners, but this is up to the preference of the instructor.
    3. Assign the webquest as homework if the students do not complete it in class.

    Day 2
    1. Collect webquest from students.
      • It is important to grade these quickly and pass them back to students, at least by Day Four. They will need to utilize their findings in the culminating activity.
    2. Have students complete the formative assessment from PBS Learning Media on plagiarism at: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/student/code/bee367/.
    3. When all students have completed the formative assessment, review the answers with them, insuring that any confusion is addressed.
    4. Introduce the video from PBS Learning Media (http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a80790bf-e0d8-4325-bdd2-075340879f91/a80790bf-e0d8-4325-bdd2-075340879f91/) by explaining to students that they should watch for reasons why some teens have reported resorting to plagiarizing. After the video, discuss. Ask: “What were some of the reasons teenagers gave for plagiarizing?” Tell students to turn-and-talk to review. Then, cold-call students to each give one reason.
    5. Lead the discussion to the activity in the second half of the video. Explain to students that they will be participating in an activity just like it.
    6. Divide students into groups of 3-4. Pass out a different potential plagiarism example to each group. Instruct students to read through all of the information presented, and as a group, discuss whether or not plagiarism was committed. They should also look at the school’s plagiarism policy (if one exists) to find out what actions should be taken by the school.
    7. Allow students 15-20 minutes to review and discuss. Then, have each group explain to the class what occurred in their example, whether or not it was plagiarism, and why.

    Day 3
    1. If necessary, finish presentations from Day Two.
    2. Ask students: “What is an infographic? If you have never heard of an infographic before, what do you think it might be?” Have students turn-and-talk to discuss this question. Discuss as a group.
    3. Present “What is an infographic?” presentation. Have students follow along with the guided notes.
    4. When you are done with the presentation, allow students time to explore the many, many infographics found on http://www.dailyinfographic.com

    Day 4
    1. Find an infographic from http://www.dailyinfographic.com to share with the class. You could even pick that day’s infographic! Use this as an opener for class, pointing out the qualities of an infographic that the students see.
    2. Present the culminating activity (see below).
    3. Culminating Activity

      MATERIALS: Tablet or computer for students or groups of students, Infographic Grading Rubric
      Day Four (continued):
    4. Go through the requirements of their final assignment for this mini-unit, found on the Infographic Assignment sheet. Emphasize to students that they have already done the necessary research to complete the infographic earlier in the week with their webquest.
    5. Show students how to use www.piktochart.com.
    6. Allow students time in class to work on creating their infographics in groups of no more than 2 people. As they begin working, pass back their graded webquests.

    Day 5
    1. Allow students the class period to finish their infographics. These should be done at the end of the day.
    2. Require students to email the infographic to you by clicking the “share” button at the top of the page. Then, have the students self-assess using the grading rubric.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

  • Math: statistics, graphs, and charts in the infographics
  • Library/Media: plagiarism policies, research skills, infographics
  • Science/Technology: utilizing infographic technology
  • Social Studies: plagiarism lesson for essays
  • Art: elements of design, color theory, composition
  • Community Connections

    Students can research plagiarism penalties in their area as well as at a college of their interest.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Outsiders

    Written By: Jodi Moberg

    Time Allotment

    3 weeks, meeting 5 times per week, for a 50 minute class period

    Overview

    Students will read the book The Outsiders and complete worksheet packets for each chapter. After the book, the class will watch the movie “The Outsiders”. For the final activity, students will choose a character from the book and make a poster. OUtsiders.doc

    Learning Objectives

    Students will read the book and complete worksheet packets that correspond with the chapter they are on.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Movie “The Outsiders” and Poster My Wall website.

    Materials

    One book of The Outsiders per student, one movie for the whole class to view, computer lab or cart for each student to complete a poster, worksheet packets one per student.

    Teacher Preparation

    Run off worksheet packets, have enough books for each student, check out movie from the school library or rental store, sign up for computer lab or cart.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Provide background information on the era when the book was written, 1960’s.
    2. Hand out packets and explain how and when they are to be completed.
    3. Assign books and record book numbers for future reference.
    4. Explain the book policy and the students’ responsibility in caring for it.

    Learning Activities

    1. Books will be read, chapter by chapter.
    2. There will be variety in how each chapter is read using whole class with teacher reading, round robin, pairing up, etc.
    3. During the chapter read, students will be reminded to complete the packet. Packet is due when chapter is finished.

    Culminating Activity

    1. After book is finished, students will watch “The Outsiders” movie.
    2. Students will choose a character from the book and make a poster.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Students can research in History class the issue with race and equality in the 1960’s and compare it to the world in the book The Outsiders.

    Community Connections

    Students can analyze what is happening in our country and the world and make connections in the book regarding relationships between race and socio-economic classes.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Our Amazing Earth!

    Written By: Cathryn Teubner

    Time Allotment

    4 class periods (45 minutes each)

    Overview

    Students will:
  • be introduced to the various landforms and water features that make up the surface of the Earth. In particular, they will focus on landforms and water features found in the United States.
  • create a Landforms Dictionary.
  • create an art project using a coffee filter to show the parts of earth that contain water.
  • students will see a teacher demonstration of how much of the earth is available for habitation using an apple.
  • be introduced to topographical maps and use their knowledge to create a topographical map on their knuckles.
  • make an edible model of the earth’s layers.
  • our_amazing_earth.doc

    Learning Objectives

  • Students will define and classify Earth’s physical features including landforms and water features.
  • Students will define Earth’s layers.
  • Students will understand a topographic map.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    1. Mr. DeMaio’s Lesson on Landforms- a fun youtube cartoon and photo video on landforms: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWTDmg8OI_Y
    2. Quizlet lesson – students will use the terms from quizlet to complete their landforms dictionary: https://quizlet.com/class/1672350/
    3. Geographical terms- Landforms video: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?fid=3372521&pid=1125998&type=Playlist&ugid=-1&ID=640074
    4. Scouting activity on topographical maps: http://www.scouterlife.com/2012/05/topographic-map-activity.html?m=1
    5. Topography and the Earth video: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?fid=3372521&pid=1125998&type=Playlist&ugid=-1&ID=1219282
    6. Instructions for making Earth coffee filter art project: http://www.pbs.org/parents/crafts-for-kids/coffee-filter-earth-day-art/
    7. Instructions for An Apple as Planet Earth from COSI (Center for Science and Industry) on Howtosmile.org: http://howtosmile.org/record/13110 - this is a pdf but I have attached it in a Word document at the end of the lesson (page 6). As a side note, I have also done How are Soils Classified on page 7 of this document as well as Edible Soils on page 8, just because they are fun and science should be fun!
    8. Instructions for making Edible Earth from how to smile.org. I also included a word document with the instructions: http://howtosmile.org/record/4894

    Materials

    • Teacher’s Guide: MacMillian/McGraw-Hill, Earth Science, A Closer Look, Grade 5, 2011, Our Dynamic Earth, Chapter 5 Lesson 1 Earth’s Landforms
    • For the Earth coffee filter art project- One of the following for each student: coffee filters, blue and green washable marker, large sheets of construction paper
    • For the landforms dictionary: 4 sheets of white copy paper for each students, markers
    • For the Apple as Planet Earth activity-1 apple, 1 knife- This is a teacher directed activity, students watch.
    • For Topographic Map activity- thin marker for each student
    • For Edible Earth model- 13 large marshmallows, 1 spice drop, 1 tablespoon butter, 2 cups crispy rice cereal, can of premade frosting (I used white frosting and tinted half blue and half green), large microwavable bowl, spatula or wooden spoon for mixing, paper plate, and of course access to a microwave. This makes one edible earth, so adjust for the number of students in your class or have students work in teams.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Familiarize yourself with the lesson from the textbook.
    2. Cue up websites/videos
    3. Collect materials for journals, art project, cooking project

    Introductory Activities

    1. Begin by questioning the students on their prior knowledge. Does anyone know what a landform is? What are some landforms that you already know about? What landforms do we have where we live? What other landforms have you seen when traveling? Make a list of these on the board.
    2. Have students look at a globe. Ask them what would happen if they dug straight down. Discuss if that’s possible. Ask students their prior knowledge of the layers of the earth. Make a list of any terms students already know on the board.
    3. Tell the students they will be learning about landforms and the layers of the earth in their next Science chapter.

    4. Materials: globe

      Learning Activities

      Day 1
      Landforms Introduction and Landforms dictionary
      1. View the Learning About Landforms video. Have students compare the list the class created on the board to the list Mr. DeMaio talks about in the video.
      2. Make Landforms dictionary
        • Students will cut 4 sheets of white paper in half and staple together. Label title page.
        • Instruct students to log into quizlet. Have students label each page of book with landform term from the quizlet page. Students should sketch a drawing of that kind of landform and define the term. Students may use reference books, encyclopedias, text, or internet to help them.

      Materials: white paper, reference books, internet, markers or colored pencil, stapler
      Day 2
      1. Read and discuss Lesson 1 from Science text.
      2. Partner share the landforms dictionary students made yesterday.
      3. View Geographical Terms Landforms video on Learn 360.
        • Instruct students to pay special attention to the term “topography” or “topographical maps” while viewing the video.
      4. Photo of topographical map. Ask students if they know what the lines mean. Introduce term topography and topographical map.
      5. On white board, read over the scouting lesson on Topographical maps.
      6. Using washable marker, have students draw a topographical map on their knuckles.

      Materials: Science textbook, topographical map example, washable markers
      Day 3
      1. View video on Learn 360 Topography and the Earth
        • Tell students to be watching carefully to see what % of the earth is made up of water.
        • Tell students they will need to identify the name of 2 of earth’s layers at the end of the video. Students can have paper and pencil out to write down information identified while watching the video.
      2. Have students look at globes and maps. Discuss if there is more water or land on earth. Discuss what percentage of land on earth is available for people to use.
      3. Have students watch as teacher performs Apple as Planet Earth from COSI (attached (page 5) or log into Howtosmile.org)
      4. Art Activity- Instructions for this are #6 Digital Media Components
        • Using coffee filters and washable blue and green markers color coffee filter to resemble globe.
        • Using spray bottle, wet coffee filter with water so that colors run. Allow to dry.
        • Review facts about water and the earth and jot those on the board.
        • Instruct students to write down interesting facts learned about water and the earth on a 12x18 sheet of construction paper leaving room to glue the coffee filter somewhere on the sheet.
        • These make a nice colorful display in the hallway. I have attached an example of one that we did.

      Materials: maps, globe, apple, knife, spray bottle, coffee filters, blue and green washable markers.

      Culminating Activity

      1. Review and discuss the terms learned yesterday in the 360 video- crust, mantle, inner and outer core.
      2. You will need access to a microwave and table space. We did this in the school lunchroom. Make friends with the cook before you do this activity. It is fun, but it is messy!
      3. Detailed instructions for this project can be found in #8 Digital Media Components or in Word document below.
        • Under teacher guidance, have students create an edible earth. If you have a small class, it is fun for each student to make their own. Otherwise, you could do this project in small groups.
        • Reviewing terms studied (mantle, core, crust, etc.) while making this project helps reinforce learning.

      Materials: microwave, measuring cups, paper plates, microwavable bowl, wooden spoon for stirring, marshmallows, spice drops, butter, crispy rice cereal, frosting for the “crust”(directions call for Magic Shell, but I tried this and it was messy and didn’t work well)

      Cross-Curricular Activity

    5. Students could create a poem about the layers of earth.
    6. Students could write a play using specific landforms in the setting and present it to a younger grade.
    7. Students could half, double, triple, etc. the recipe for the edible earth project.
    8. Students could plot major landforms in a map of the state they live in or a state they’d like to visit.

    9. Materials: paper, maps, calculators

      Community Connections

    10. Students could set up the projects that they have done in the hallway at Parent Teacher conferences so that parents and other classes could view them.
    11. Students could email visitors bureaus in other states to get information about landforms in other states.

    12. Materials: computer/internet

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Once More, with Feeling!

    Written By: Paula Sperle
    Grade Level: 1

    Time Allotment

    45-50 mins.

    Overview

    The students will watch and analyze videos in order to review the use of periods and question marks and to recognize exclamatory sentences. They will practice putting exclamation points at the end of written exclamatory sentences. They will discuss their ideas with the entire class. Once_More,_with_Feeling.doc

    Subject Matter

    Written English

    Learning Objectives

    • The students will review the use of question marks and periods at the ends of sentences.
    • The students will identify exclamatory statements.
    • The students will write exclamatory statements, ending them with exclamation points.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    1. Between the Lions: There’s a Gorilla: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/btl10.ela.early.theresagorilla/theres-a-gorilla/
    2. The Electric Company: Haunted House: House of Horror: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a8af768d-e172-4345-a0ce-953be95ca856/haunted-house-house-of-horror/)
    3. Clips from movie Inside Out. Inside Out. Dirs. Pete Doctor and Ronaldo Del Carmen. Pixar, 2015.

    Materials

  • Active board connected to computer
  • Lined paper with pictures of the characters Joy, Anger, and Fear from the movie Inside Out
  • Large cutout exclamation points and question marks, one set per student
  • List of simple statements from Inside Out movie: interrogative, declarative, exclamatory
  • Reading textbooks
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Mark the “There’s a Gorilla” and the “Haunted House” videos as favorites on the Prairie Public PBS Learning Media site for ease in locating them when needed.
    2. Locate and save appropriate clips from the movie Inside Out. These clips should be examples of exclamatory statements made by the characters Joy, Fear, and Anger, or by Riley when one of those characters are controlling her.
    3. Cut large exclamation points out of construction paper that are similar in size to question marks the students have used in previous lessons. Only the vertical line needs to be cut out. The dot on bottom can be the same as the one used as a period and with the question mark in previous lessons.
    4. Design and print lined sheets of paper that have pictures of Joy, Fear, and Anger from the movie Inside Out.

    Introductory Activities

    Materials:
  • Between the Lions: “There’s a Gorilla” video clip
  • Active Board, computer

    1. Ask the students to review the use of question marks and periods. Keep the discussion short.
    2. Introduce the “There’s a Gorilla” video as a review of periods and questions marks, but warn the students that a new punctuation mark is going to sneak into the video. Instruct them to keep their eyes and ears open to try to find it.
    3. Play the video on the Active Board.
    4. Question the students about the “new” punctuation mark: the exclamation point.

    Learning Activities

    Materials:
  • Electric Company: Haunted House: House of Horror
  • Active Board, computer
  • Lined paper with pictures of characters

    1. Inform the students that they will see another short video clip that will give them more information about exclamation points.
    2. Show the Electric Company clip to the class.
    3. Discuss the emotions that caused the mummy to say exclamatory statements.
    4. Show clips of Inside Out that show Joy, Fear, and Anger and include at least one exclamatory statement from each. Ask the students to write down an exclamation from each clip shown using the sheet of paper that has the speaking character’s picture on it. Remind them to end the statement with an exclamation point.
    5. Share and discuss the students’ responses and punctuation.

    Culminating Activity

    Materials:
  • Punctuation mark cutouts
  • Teacher list of quotations from the movie

    1. The teacher will state a series of quotations from the Inside Out movie that have not been used previously.
    2. Using the punctuation mark cutouts, the students will hold up the correct end punctuation for each statement.
    3. Discuss the reasons for the choices.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Materials:
  • Reading textbooks
  • cutouts

    1. During reading class, remind the students to watch the punctuation marks while they read aloud.
    2. Ask a student to choose any sentence in the story, and to read it with the correct emotion.
    3. Then, the student will pretend it has a different end punctuation and will read it accordingly.
    4. By using the cutouts, the other students will guess which punctuation mark the student is pretending to read.

    Community Connections

    The students are instructed to listen to comments made at home during the evening. When they return to school the next day, each will report one exclamation that he/she heard in the home.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Sphero Racer! Mean, Median, Mode and Range

    Written By: Sarah Becker
    Grade Level: 5-7

    Time Allotment

    3 – 45 min class periods

    Overview

    Conduct races with Sphero to collect data and calculate mean, median, mode and range. Students will be asked to make predictions, conduct Spero races, tabulate data, make calculations. The class will graph data and analyze race results. Students will be asked to write statistical descriptions and make analytical predictions.
    LessonPlan.docx

    Subject Matter

    Math, Technology, Science, Language Arts

    Learning Objectives

  • Students will be able to define and calculate mean, median, mode and range from a set of data.
  • Students will use scientific method to conduct an experiment as well as give written descriptions of their experiment and results.
  • Students will get an introduction to the basic features of Sphero
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • Measures of Central Tendency: Finding Mean, Median, and Mode by Khan Academy
  • Accessible through Khan academy site or OS app Accessible through pbslearningmedia.org
  • Dunk Tank!: Mean, Median, Mode & Range: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ea4d290e-7d88-43b6-b50f-5f3355df5e49/ea4d290e-7d88-43b6-b50f-5f3355df5e49/
  • Sphero App – iOS device, phone or iPad
  • Introduction video: https://youtu.be/brpnvM9VWpI Course Video - https://youtu.be/G00bL7c3It4
  • Google Docs access for materials and links: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-W5XURsiyaHfk1UR3BDQ2ZTUXE3eFpGSGVQajRpS29CMHJ5emY4M05QWEc5ajFKLUFseE0&usp=sharing
  • Materials

    • Sphero – 1 for every 2 or 3 students
    • iPad/iPhone for each Sphero
    • Stop watch for each group- could be a second device
    • Make a course on the floor with masking tape, yarn or string for each group
    • Link to Sphero introduction and sample course
    • Materials
  • Video links – and activity worksheets for videos
  • Spreadsheet for recording data results: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/14KIckf3eBngxjYCzdM4tHlRkazxGqKbLro1ku2whG5o/edit?usp=sharing
  • Worksheet for practicing calculations
  • Prediction worksheet
  • Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    • Learn Vocabulary
    • Gain background information
    • Practice skills

    Vocabulary: Mean, Median, Mode and Range
    Materials: Mean, Median, Mode and Range
    Video Link: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-W5XURsiyaHfk1UR3BDQ2ZTUXE3eFpGSGVQajRpS29CMHJ5emY4M05QWEc5ajFKLUFseE0&usp=sharing
  • This document has a link to the Dunk Tank Video and the Khan Academy Link
  • This document can be printed or used digitally for students to complete notes

  • Videos and activities can be watched as a class with a projector and screen or students can work independently or as partners depending on what equipment is available. Both video options have explanations on the terms, what they mean and how they are calculated. Each video option has interactive activity to help practice skills related the mean, median, mode
    Depending on time and your class after videos and activities
    1. more practice problems
    2. watch introduction video for Sphero and take time to play with Sphero and the app
    3. discuss and complete the prediction sheet

    Learning Activities

    Day 2
    Activity Day – Sphero Racing
    • Set up a course for each group with tape, yarn, etc
    • Provide each group with an iPad/iPhone with Sphero app, a Sphero, some sort of stop watch, data sheet
    • Activity Documents – Predictions and Data Collection Sheet: https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B-W5XURsiyaHfk1UR3BDQ2ZTUXE3eFpGSGVQajRpS29CMHJ5emY4M05QWEc5ajFKLUFseE0&usp=sharing
      1. Watch Sphero introduction and activity video - Link- App, Link - Course
      2. Play with Sphero
      3. Have students run course and collect data. Time(seconds)
      4. *After experiment, each student can complete calculations
      5. *Gather data for the whole class and calculate values for class

      *Depending on time steps 4 and 5 may be completed in Day 3

      Culminating Activity

      Day 3

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Layer by Layer 3D Illusions with a Spice of the Core-A Project Based Learning Assessment

    Written By: Margaret Johnson
    Grade Level: 4

    Time Allotment

    4 class periods at 50 minutes each

    Overview

    Project-based learning is a dynamic classroom approach in which students actively explore real-world problems and challenges, acquiring a deeper knowledge. Incorporating art with science, math, social studies and literacy inspires students to observe the world around them. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of ecosystems by creating an interesting work of art (a 3D tunnel book) that can be displayed to show their understanding. layer_by_layer_3D_illusions_with_spice_of_the_core_(2).docx

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
  • be able to kinesthetic/hands on create a 3D tunnel book
  • study a brief history of bookmaking
  • study the ecosystem of region chosen
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • Ecosystems: http://www.learn360.com/Search.aspx?GradeLevel=3360057&lid=7411464&SearchText=ecosystems&MediaFormat=22186805&
  • PD for teachers: http://teachingchannel.org
  • What is an ecosystem? http://WWW.LEARN360.COM/SHOWVIDEO.ASPX?LID=7411464&PAGEALL=2&SEARCHTEXT=ECOSYSTEMS&ID=148971
  • Ecosystems and Biodiversity: http://emc.cmich.edu/EMC_Orchard/meecs-ecosystems-and-biodiversity-versiobjectives
  • Exploring Ecosystems: http://www.clayhillforest.org/education/lessonplans/elementary/exploringecosystems.pdf

  • North Dakota Studies: http://www.ndstudies.org/search/results/search&keywords=ecosystems/ Ecosystems in ND
  • Video Clips: http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/lsps07.sci.life.oate.ecosystem/analyzing-an-ecosystem/ Analyzing an ecosystem

  • Transmedia
  • interactive story board: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/tools/storyboard/new/
  • lesson plan builder: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/tools/lessonbuilder/new/
  • interactive game on how an ecosystem survives: http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/plum14.sci.life.makemangrove/make-a-mangrove-an-ecosystem-game/
  • Materials

    Session One/Setting the Stage for Tunnel Book Assessment:
  • Pencil and eraser
  • Scissors
  • Construction paper crayons
  • Glue Stick
  • Ruler
  • Videos
  • Prints
  • 4 Papers (bond)(your color choice) 41/4 x51/2inches )(opt. have students measure for borders or you have measurements printed on papers and eliminate student measuring)
  • 2 papers cardstock (your color choice) 41/4 x51/2inches
  • Diagrams of the above paper dimensions attached at the end of this document
  • Rubric example at the end of this document
  • Student research of the ecosystem chosen in collaboration with librarian and/or classroom teacher

  • Session Two/Learning:
  • Same materials as in session one (continuation)
  • Art prints and books available.

  • Session Three and Four/Learning/Culminating Activities:
  • Same materials as before needed to complete the project
  • Art prints and books available.
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Preview and set up media components.
      • Computer
      • Avervision (document camera)
      • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
      • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
      • Screen or wall on which to project images
      • Optional smart board
    2. Prepare materials – Prior to starting unit. Gather materials so each student has the following:
      • 4 Papers (your color choice) 41/4 x51/2inches )(opt. have students measure for borders or you have borders printed on for measurement)
      • 2 papers cardstock (your color choice) 41/4 x51/2inches
      • Research for the ecosystem/habitat they’ll be creating
      • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
      • Scissors (1/student)
      • Construction paper crayons (variety of colors)
      • Glue Stick (1/student or share)
      • Ruler (1/student)

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1

    Overview of unit:
    • Students will research the ecosystem they have chosen (collaboration)
    • Students will learn about what makes up an ecosystem by answering the essential questions.
    • Students will learn about bookmaking and what an accordion book is, specifically a Tunnel Book.
    • Students will compare their ecosystems with each other. Assessment will be the exhibit of their tunnel book which includes their research.
    • In doing so, Math, Social Studies, Language Arts and Visual Arts will be integrated into this unit of study

    Activities: (research can be done with the librarian and/or classroom teacher or in collaboration of all involved)
    Day 2
    1. After research is completed, demonstration to begin our learning activities.
    2. A. Pass out materials:
      • (Colored) papers (student color choice) 41/4x 51/2(6/student)
      • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
      • Rulers (1/student)
      • Construction paper crayons (share)
    3. B. Demonstrate as students follow along:
      • Discuss and show examples of tunnel books
      • Diagrams on how to assemble the tunnel book are at the end of this presentation format. Demo according to the diagram given.
      • Discuss ideas on how to visually tell and show their habitats/ecosystems
      • Demonstrate drawings for each page of the tunnel book; sketching lightly, filling 80% of page from top to bottom/side to side. Terms: Background (back page), midground (the 2 middle pages), foreground (the cover of tunnel book). Each page to represent a part of their ecosystem with the cover to also include the title of their ecosystem.
      • Demonstrate how to use crayons by using little movements, pressing hard to create layering colors – mixing/blending and building up surface to give the images depth and creating new colors.
      • Students work
      • Clean area/put papers away

    Learning Activities

    Day 3 and 4
    1. Pass out materials:
      • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
      • Ruler (1/student)
      • Scissors (1/student)
      • Glue stick (2/table)
      • Pass out papers to students.
    2. Demonstrate
      • Review previous instructions
      • Introduce how to finish book
      • Work day
    3. Explore
      • Consider adding embellishments on top of your habitat tunnel book by collaging pictures found online, in magazines or drawn.

    Day 5 (if needed or extend learning)
    • Finish/discussions
    • Rubric example at the end of this document
    • Explore more!

    Discussion: In looking at the finished tunnel book: (opt. finish these sentences and possibly create an artist’s statement)
    • My tunnel book features……?………ecosystem
    • The media I used was……….
    • I was influenced by…….
    • One of the things that was a challenge for me was….
    • One of the things that was the easiest for me was…
    • The title I’m thinking about giving my tunnel book work of art is………

    Other Discussion Topics
    • Ecosystems
    • World craft/art form/bookmaking
    • Elements of Art
    • Research writing/ information gathered

    Culminating Activity

    After creating the hands-on artwork assignment(s), students will:
    1. (Visual Art)
      • Display finished artwork within their school.
      • Share and reflect with peers.
      • Each student can verbalize about their artwork using academic terms (terms to be taught in a given course)
    2. (Social Studies)
      • Identify the location/region of ecosystem studied or represented.
      • Explain how background and history influence people’s actions (e.g., farming methods, hunting methods, economic decisions)
    3. (Math)
      • Use a variety of strategies to solve problems; drawing pictures to plan out finished artwork.
      • Describe the attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Identify, describe, and model (e.g., using straws or other materials) parallel, perpendicular, and intersecting lines and line segments
    4. (Science)
      • Identify the ecosystem represented
      • Explain how the ecosystem is a group of plants, animals and bacteria that work together to remain healthy.
    5. (Language Arts)
      • Write about the ecosystem research.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • Visual Art - paint with soils, opt: (one point perspective drawing, sculpture, composition, graphic design-travel brochures)
    • Science - paper (3D art), seasons, soil properties, habitats and ecosystems
    • Social Studies - land formations, climate, characteristics of significant features of the state/region
    • Math - Draw pictures to solve problems, describe 2D and 3D shapes
    • Language Arts - write to understand and improve comprehension

    Community Connections

    • Hjemkomst Center: http://www.hjemkomstcenter.com/‎ The Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center, commonly known as the Hjemkomst Center, is an interpretation center museum in Moorhead, Minnesota
    • Red River Zoo- Fargo, ND
    • Buffalo River State Park: Minnesota DNR –Regional Science Center
    • Clay County Historical Society http://www.hcscconline.org/‎ The Clay County Historical Society was established in Moorhead, Minnesota, in 1932 to collect, preserve and disseminate the history of Clay County.
    • The Rourke Art Museum: http://www.therourke.org/
    • Plains Art Museum: http://plainsart.org’exhibits/. Students in ND and northern MN can relate to many of the artworks found at these museums in Fargo, ND and Moorhead, MN. The exhibits change throughout the year, so I am providing these links that could be used to preview and select an art work that will complement the lessons. (Art works always need to be previewed for appropriateness before displaying them for students.)
    • Visiting with science teachers in your district

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: iHistory...an Event!

    Written By: Jocelyn Anderson
    Grade Level: 7-8

    Time Allotment

    parts of many class periods, at home work, and an afternoon for the Event

    Overview

    Students will research an American history maker, gather a costume...which includes a historically accurate hat/headgear, create a tri-fold board, and “be in character” for a culminating event. JocelynAnderson

    Subject Matter

    American history, language arts, technology, art, social studies

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to:
    • gather and organize pertinent information about their chosen American history maker
    • share their historical knowledge, in first person and with a tri-fold board and iMovie presentation
    • gather...find, beg, borrow! a costume, that includes some sort of historically accurate headgear!
    • create an accurate/attractive tri-fold board
    • evaluate the significant events of their person’s life
    • using the context of their chosen historical person, make connections about the historical era of that person’s life...the 1920’s or the Civil War Era, etc.
    • produce an iMovie on their chosen historical history maker covering important aspects of their person and their historical era

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Because this in a final project for the American history classes, many and various video clips have been shown throughout the school year. I always make it a practice to point out the historically accurate clothing, sets, hair design, etc. I also engage the students in making connections to their textbook.
    • America The Story of Us (The History Channel) clips were shown when they pertained.
    • Many Learn 360 (PBS) clips throughout the year were shown also
    • American Experience (PBS)
    • Ken Burns America (PBS)
    • New Dimensions Media….on many historical topics.

    Materials

    Each student has an school issued iPad.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Weekly assignments that break up the research into segments like fashion and clothing, inventions, medical advances, political happenings, wars, etc. of the era chosen (Civil War era, Revolutionary War era, 1930’s, etc)
    2. reserve the Event location...school gym
    3. notify parents of the Event by way of a letter sent home
    4. secure judges and prizes, etc. (rubric for judging, medals for awards)
    5. create assessment rubrics for the Event...costume and tri-fold board, distributed to the students

    Introductory Activities

    I visited with my classes about this project from time to time during the school year. At the beginning of the fourth quarter, we got serious. We reviewed our American history topics/people and discussed possibilities and what would be included and expected. Each student could pick an American history maker, but not a President. Students were not allowed to pick the same person as a classmate.

    Learning Activities

    1. weekly assignments that require saved screens on their iPads that documented their research...to be later incorporated into their iMovie
    2. after getting their historical person approved, they needed to start research. We started with fashion and clothing of their chosen era (assuming that historical costumes could be a bit challenging!)
    3. we moved on to inventions and medical advances of the various eras of their selected person they had picked.
    4. political happenings (ratifying the Constitution, the Civil War, the Great Depression, etc.) were detailed according to each student’s person and era
    5. music, culture, art, of the eras were included in the research
    6. later assignments/activities included practicing talking “in first person” about their person’s life’s happenings (birth, education, significant events, contributions, etc)
    7. the students created digital invitations to send out to family and friends for email or social media…this was a great photography component!
    8. creating an attractive tri fold was discussed, (titles, pictures, timelines, borders) possible artifacts to have on display, (newspapers, books, etc)
    9. if their era was more recent, students were encouraged to talk to older people who live through that era.

    Culminating Activity

    iHistory Day (2-3 hours) is the culminiating activity
    On a personal note, our iHistory Day was an amazing day with lots of excitement in the air.The students had amazing costumes with amazing detail in hats, shoes, and hair. The tri-fold boards were wonderful combinations of the American history maker facts and that person’s historical era. The students had amazing artifacts: books, flags, planes, maps, sports equipment. Outside judging and awards happened. I used the assessment rubric that students had for gradebook purposes. Our day included guest appearances from Stonewall Jackson, Betsy Ross, Charles Lindbergh, Jack London, Emily Dickinson, Susan B Anthony, Meriwether Lewis, Harriet Beecher Stowe, John Smith, Rosie, the Riveter (an icon from WWII), Amelia Earhart, Louis Gehrig, Billy Sunday, Mrs. Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Douglas MacArthur Norman Rockwell, Sakakawea, etc.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    The students used many skills like researching a topic, person, and era, photography, planning, keeping up with deadlines, language arts in regard to presenting their material on their tri-fold board correctly, and the language arts teacher facilitated the students getting their bibliography and citations correct.

    Community Connections

    • Many students spent time with grandparents doing primary research or getting help for a costume. Some family members dug out old newspapers and uniforms from WWII.
    • Many parents and family friends came for our Event.
    • I received wonderful feedback from parents and the students too.
    • Other classes from our school attended too.
    • Our judges were community members, like our Minot mayor, a local archaeologist, a retired history teacher who had previously been in our classroom for other activities. Minot Daily covered the Event also.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: “Indifference: What Is It, and Do I Really Care?”

    Written By: Letha Brenner
    Grade Level: 10

    Time Allotment

    Fifteen full and partial class periods

    Overview

    As students read Night by Elie Wiesel, they will explore the concept of indifference, specifically as it applies to the Holocaust. Such questions as “What does it mean to be indifferent?” and “What are the implications of indifference on personal, social and governmental levels?” will be addressed. The final activity will be a four page position paper. Prerequisites: Researching guidelines and tools, research writing, using in-text citations, and following MLA standards Indifference_Letha_Brenner.doc

    Learning Objectives

    Studying written, visual and audio text, students will be able to:
    • Read and view complex text
    • Analyze complex text
    • Compare and contrast positions
    • Exercise complex thoughts to state and argue a position
    • Use text evidence to support that position
    • Organize all materials to write a position paper, correctly citing sources

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Elie Wiesel: The Perils of Indifference - speech with written transcript. Presented in the East Room of the White House in 1999, this speech is part of the Millennium Lecture Series hosted by President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hilary Rodham Clinton: http://www.historyplace.com/speeches/wiesel.htm
    Agnes Mandl Adachi: Rescue – Oral History - video with written transcript Holocaust Encyclopedia Rescue: United States Holocaust Museum. This video is a personal account by a Holocaust survivor of rescue from Budapest: http://www.ushmm.org
    Downplaying the Holocaust - Sulzberger & NY Times: Anna Blech - persuasive speech This TED Talk is focused on the U.S. media’s coverage of the Holocaust. It also discusses the US citizens’ and the government’s role in the Holocaust: http://tedxtalks.ted.com/video/Downplaying-the-Holucaust-Solz
    Fighting Indifference: Looking at World Response to the Holocaust with Elie Wiesel by Eric Brassman – journalism essay. The Morningside Review: Selected essays from the Columbia University Undergraduate Writing Program: http://morningsidereview.org/ . This piece looks at two different points of view regarding indifference. The author is close in age to sophomores (a college undergrad).

    Materials

    Novel

    Teacher Preparation

    • Day 1: Put dictionary definition of indifference on interactive board
    • Day 2: Have examples of indifference marked in Night
    • Day3: Compile student research descriptions
    • Download following source – Elie Wiesel’s The Perils of Indifference
    • Day 4: Download Fighting Indifference: Looking at World Response to the Holocaust with Elie Wiesel
    • Day 5: Clean up compare/contrast shared document, eliminating repeats, etc.
    • Day 6: Download map of Budapest region
    • Download following source Agnes Mandl Adachi: Rescue – Oral History
    • Day 8: Download Downplaying the Holocaust - Sulzberger & NY Times: Anna Blech
    • Day 9: Review historical/current day materials
    • Day 10: Download and post Outline Format (attached) on interactive board
    • Send outline format to students on googledocs

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. With the teacher playing a victim, ask for one student to role-play the bully.
    2. Direct the bully to hurl as many (school-appropriate) insults at the victim as possible.
    3. Direct remainder of students to react as they normally would.
    4. Discuss Reactions/Feelings: i.e. powerless, angry, indifferent, etc.

    Day 2
    1. Ask students to share their journal entries. Compare and contrast situations and reactions. Discuss responsibility.

    Day 3
    1. Direct each student to summarize their present-day global indifference research as classmates follow on interactive board.
    2. Generate discussion: “How did this happen?” and “What could people have done differently?” and “What is your reaction to this event?”

    Day 4
    1. Explain that this article will further explore the idea of indifference by looking at two different positions.

    Day 5
    1. Look at document again. Students should raise any other questions, concerns, or need for clarification at this time.

    Day 6
    1. Collect handout responses.
    2. Ask students if they personally know anyone who was/is a Holocaust survivor.
    3. Ask students if they personally know someone who has either benefited or suffered from indifference. Discuss.
    4. Show map of Budapest region
    5. Introduce Agnes Mandl Adachi

    Day 7
    1. Re-examine video narrative.

    Day 8
    1. Students will share accounts of indifference. Characters may remain anonymous.
    2. Point out to students: We’ve talked mainly of indifference on an individual basis.
    3. Today we’ll look at media, social, and governmental incidents.

    Day 9
    1. Explain to students that after looking at indifference from a historical and current day perspective – on individual, societal, and governmental levels – it is time for each of them to take a position.

    Day 10
    1. Take a position example: Do as a class
    2. Direct students to take a position on mowing grass. Follow their lead (yes, grass should be mowed; no, grass should be left to grow).

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. Show dictionary definition of indifference on interactive board.
    2. Direct students to write definition in their notebooks.
    3. Discuss as class: Where do we see indifference in our school and community?

    Day 2
    1. Divide students into small groups. Assign: In 10 minutes, find at least three examples of indifference in the novel Night. Cite page and paragraph for easy referencing.
    2. Regroup class and ask groups to share findings.

    Day 3
    1. Explain to students that they’ll now read and listen to Elie Wiesel’s speech on indifference.
    2. Direct students to take notes throughout.
    3. Discuss speech and student notes

    Day 4
    1. Read the article together, stopping as needed for explanation and clarification.
    2. Direct students to highlight any areas of concern, interest, or needed clarification.
    3. After reading, discuss positions

    Day 5
    1. Go through shared compare/contrast list and direct students to continue “cleaning up.” Goal: Clear and concise descriptions in final list.
    2. Send list to students’ accounts for future reference

    Day 6
    1. Leave the lights on
    2. Play video of Agnes Mandl Adachi
    3. Direct students to take notes as they listen and watch

    Day 7
    1. Direct students to share journal entries.
    2. Guide discussion during and after readings.

    Day 8
    1. Watch video
    2. Eliminate visual for one minute so students can hear a sense of this person
    3. Pause video midway for discussion, clarification
    4. Direct students to write questions, points of interest or clarification as they view

    Day 9
    1. Consider your responses to the questions in Handout #2 before creating a thesis statement.

    Day 10
    1. Together, come up with a working outline. Include supports and examples. From the introduction to the closing, outline this subject/position together.

    Culminating Activity

    Day 1
    1. Assign: Direct students to each write a journal entry: “I feel indifferent about _________________ because…” (Hopefully they won’t write “this assignment”!)

    Day 2
    1. After noting school, community, and Holocaust examples of indifference in lessons one and two, direct students to each research and find one example of global indifference today, and send a short description to you on googledocs.

    Day 3
    1. Assigned Writing Activity: Direct students to write positions on whether or not they agree with Elie Wiesel. Two in-text citations must support position.

    Day 4
    1. Assign students to create a list of comparisons and contrasts between the two positions. Send to googledocs.

    Day 5
    1. Direct students to complete short answer questions on Handout #1 for tomorrow.

    Day 6
    1. Direct students to write a journal entry: “What were the risks involved? Were the results worth the risks? Be prepared to share your views tomorrow.

    Day 7
    1. Assign students to interview an adult re: his or her experience with indifference. Get as many details as possible. Write a journal entry regarding that account.

    Day 8
    1. Discuss: What are the moral responsibilities of the individual, the press, society, and government leaders? Should there be exceptions?

    Day 9
    1. Direct students to write responses to Handout #2 questions and to come to class with a well thought-out thesis statement.

    Day 10
    1. Direct each student to share their thesis statement on indifference with a partner
    2. Ask students to look for clarity; precise and concise language, powerful words.
    3. Assign: Completed outline due tomorrow
    4. Direct students to turn in papers.
    5. Guide the class in a unit review unit using a shared google document on the interactive board. Use categories such as pros, cons, highs, lows, “What I learned most from the research,” and “What I learned most in the writing process.”

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    This unit would work well with the social sciences.

    Community Connections

    Students will interview an adult citizen of the community.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: How Does Your Garden Grow?

    Written By: Monica Thompson
    Grade Level: 2

    Time Allotment

    2 weeks

    Overview

    Students will be learning about parts of a plant and what they need to grow. How_Does_Your_Garden_Grow-_Thompson.doc

    Subject Matter

    Science

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will identify parts of a plant
    • Students will work cooperatively in group observation
    • Students will communicate knowledge to a partner
    • Students will identify the needs for plants to grow
    • Students will observe the inside of bean seed
    • Students will plant a seed and make observations on plant growth
    • Students will demonstrate the sequence of plant growth

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • PBS Video: Seed Intro: Dinosaur Train: Planting a Garden http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ad8e3c36-8859-40b9-b13b-d0346649dd83/ad8e3c36-8859-40b9-b13b-d0346649dd83/
  • PBS Online game: Sid the Science Game: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a4fb71a6-8fdd-4df9-8eea-07cdc793c31e/vegetable-planting-sid-the-science-kid-games/
  • PBS Video: Joey Noir Plants and Seeds: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/24c92563-21c7-4bab-ad50-4156378fdf58/abra-306-joey-noir-plants-and-seeds/
  • PBS video: From Seed to Fruit: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/evscps.sci.life.seed/from-seed-to-fruit/
  • Plant Observation book: (Free) https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Plant-Observation-book-153375
  • Story Planning Sheet: http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/myplacemyspace/downloads/promote-your-day-out/storyboard-template.pdf
  • Online book creator: Little Bird Tales https://www.littlebirdtales.com
  • Materials

    • Flowering plants
    • Science Journals
    • Plant Observation Books (1 for each student)
    • Baggies
    • Paper Towels
    • Lima beans
    • Magnify glasses

    Teacher Preparation

    • Buy flowering plants
    • Buy beans, baggies
    • Photocopy Plant Observation Book and Story Planning Sheet

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
  • Objectives:
    • Students will identify parts of a plants
    • Students will work cooperatively in a group observations
  • Materials:
    • Small live flowering plants (1 flower per 2 or 3 students)
    • Magnify glasses
    • Science Journal
    1. Introduction Video: PBS Dinosaur Train Planting a Garden http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/ad8e3c36-8859-40b9-b13b-d0346649dd83/ad8e3c36-8859-40b9-b13b-d0346649dd83/
    2. Parts of a Real Flower
      • List the parts of a plant on the board (roots, stem, leaves, and flower). Have the children investigate to figure out which part of the plant matches the word.
      • Split the children into groups of 2 or 3. Give each group a flower.
      • Have the children observe the flower using their magnify glasses and hands. Encourage the children to pull away the soil, but be careful of the plant.
      • Bring the children back together and identify the parts of the plant. While identifying, have the children follow along with their flower.
      • In science journal, students will draw a picture of their plant and label the parts.

    Learning Activities

    Day 2
    Title: KWL of plant growth
    Objective:
    • Students will identify the needs for plant growth.
    • Students will communicate their knowledge and questions to the class.

    Materials:
    • Large piece of paper
    • Individual KWL charts

    Activities:
    1. Have the children independently write what they already know about plants growing. Then have the children independently write what they want to learn about plants growing.
    2. Bring all of the children together and compile their information onto a large KWL chart for the classroom. Take time to discuss why they think certain things might be needed.
    3. Have the children place their KWL sheet in their Science Journal. Post the classroom KWL sheet in a location in the classroom that is easy to locate and read.
    4. Review planting a garden by having students play an online game. PBS Sid the Science Game: Vegetable Planting http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/a4fb71a6-8fdd-4df9-8eea-07cdc793c31e/vegetable-planting-sid-the-science-kid-games/
    Day 3
    Title: Look Inside a Seed
    Objective:
  • Students will observe the inside of a bean seed.

  • Materials:
    • Lima beans (soaked overnight)
    • Water
    • Magnify glasses

    Activities:
    1. PBS Video: Joey Noir Plants and Seeds http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/24c92563-21c7-4bab-ad50-4156378fdf58/abra-306-joey-noir-plants-and-seeds/
    2. Show the children how to carefully open a lima bean. Have them carefully look through the lima bean.
    3. After self-exploration, help the students find the baby plant, the seed shell, and the food inside the seed.
    4. Review with the children what a plant needs to grow. Then show them that the baby plant will feed off the food in the shell until it is a mature plant.
    DAY 4

    Title: Grow a Seed
    Objective:
  • Students will observe plant growth by planting seeds.

  • Materials:
  • Baggie for each student
  • Bean seeds
  • Paper towels
  • Plant Observation Book

  • Activities:
    1. Give each student a baggie. Explain to them that they are going to observe a bean plant grow. Have the children discuss what will be needed for the seed to grow (air, sun, water, nutrients).
    2. Have the children place a moistened paper towel in the baggie. Next have them place 3 bean seeds in front of the paper towel so they will be able to observe it.
    3. Place baggies on a classroom window where the children will be able to easily observe the growth.
    4. Extension: Every day, the children will make an observation in their Plant Observation Book. This will include noting any changes, make any predictions, note the stage the bean is in, and measure the bean seed and any growth. Send the bean plant home in a plastic baggie with a wet paper towel at the end of this unit.
    Day 5
    Title: Make Flower Diagram
    Objective:
    • Students will identify parts of a plant.
    • Students will communicate knowledge to a partner.
    Materials:
  • Construction paper (light blue, brown, green, plus multiple other colors)

  • Activities:
    1. Watch PBS video: From Seed to Fruit http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/evscps.sci.life.seed/from-seed-to-fruit/
    2. Have the children verbally review the parts of the plant and what they need to grow.
    3. Explain and show the flower diagram the children will be making. Explain that you will be including all parts of a plant in this diagram.
    4. Walk the children through making the project using the construction paper. Have the children make the stem and leaves green, the roots light brown, the soil dark brown, and the flower petals any color.
    5. After completing the project, have the students explain to a partner the different parts of a plant.
    Day 6-7
    Title: My Plant book
    Objective:
  • Students will observe plant growth.
  • Student will sequence a plants growth.
  • Materials:
  • Story Planning Sheet for book writing process
  • Pencils

  • Activities:
    1. Review the different stages of plant growth. Have students refer to their Science Journal and KWL Chart.
    2. Give each child a copy of the Story Planning sheet to start planning their book: http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/myplacemyspace/downloads/promote-your-day-out/storyboard-template.pdf
    3. Students will work independently to write a draft of their book about plants. Book should start with a seed and what is needed for seeds to grow into plants.
    4. Have students share their story planning sheet with a partner.

    Culminating Activity

    DAYS 8-10
    Title: Assessment: Plant Life Cycle
    Objective:
  • Students will create an online book about plant growth.

  • Materials:
  • Story Planning Sheet
  • Computers

  • Activities:
    1. Student will create an online digital story.
    2. In the computer lab, demonstrate how to use, Little Bird Tales. https://www.littlebirdtales.com
    3. Show students how to: (This may be broken up over the three days)
      1. Log-in
      2. Create a new story
      3. Add drawings with the drawing tools
      4. Add text
      5. Record their voices
      6. Saving.
    4. Students will create a book that demonstrates their knowledge about the process of planting a seed and what it needs to grow. The online book will have drawings, text and audio recording.
    5. When the books are complete, students will share their books with the class.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. Math: Measure and graph the bean plants as they grow
    2. Reading: Read about different kinds of plants
    3. Social: Imports and exports of plants (food)

    Community Connections

    1. Visit a community garden
    2. Visit a farm
    3. Have a gardener, farmer visit the classroom
    4. Field Trip to the grocery store to see how the food gets to the store.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Genocide: Not Just Events in the Past

    Written By: Karen Komulainen
    Grade Level: 11-12

    Time Allotment

    One 75-minute class period

    Overview

    This will be the opening class session for a brand new class that I will be teaching in the Fall Semester, 2015. The goal of this lesson is to introduce students to the concept of genocide through brainstorming, discussion, reading and visual media. At the end of the class period students should understand that genocides are not just tragedies that occurred in the past, but they are events that are still occurring in various parts of the world today. GenocideNotJustEventsinthePast.docx

    Subject Matter

    History

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to identify several genocides in history and in recent times. Students will be able to understand America’s role in intervening in genocides.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • “Clinton: Genocide in Yugoslavia” video found at http://tpt.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/amex24.socst.ush.yugoslavia/clinton-genocide-in-yugoslavia-essay/
  • “Clinton: Crises in Somalia and Rwanda” video found at http://tpt.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/amex24.socst.ush.somalia/clinton-crises-in-somalia-and-rwanda/
  • “Human Beings and Mass Slaughter” from the book Worse Than War: Genocide, Eliminationism, and the Ongoing Assault on Humanity by Daniel Jonah Goldhagen found at http://www.pbs.org/wnet/worse-than-war/stories-essays/understanding
  • Main entrance gate at Auschwitz photo found at http://www.history.com/topics/world-war-ii/the-holocaust/pictures/holocaust-concentration-camps/poland-auschwitz-birkenau-death-camp
  • Materials

    Laptop, Smart Board, Projector, Sound System-1 per class

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Bookmark the four web pages listed in the ‘Digital Media Components’ section above prior to the start of class.
    2. Write the following questions on the whiteboard: What is genocide? How many genocides in history can you & your table partner name? Should the U.S. intervene when another nation is committing genocide? Do genocides still occur today?
    3. Have the ‘Main entrance gate at Auschwitz’ photo on the Smart Board upon students’ arrival to class.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Instruct students to view the photo of Auschwitz’ main entrance, if they have not already done so.
    2. Ask students what the picture is showing. (a few will know, most will not) Review the process of the Holocaust along with the death camp statistics. **All students learned about the Holocaust in the Spring, 2015 semester of American History.
    3. With their table partner, have students discuss and record their answers to the four questions that are written on the whiteboard.

    Learning Activities

    1. Discuss students’ responses to the four questions as a class.
    2. The teacher should then put the “Human Beings and Mass Slaughter” article up on the Smartboard for reading as a whole class. Follow this with open discussion.
    3. Hand out the ‘Video Discussion Questions.’ Review them with the students so they know what they are to be listening for as they view the two video clips.
    4. Show the video clip “Clinton: Genocide in Yugoslavia” first.
    5. Then show the video clip “Clinton: Crises in Somalia & Rwanda.”
    6. Give the class a few minutes for a question and answer session.
    7. Instruct students to respond to the questions on the ‘Video Discussion Questions’ handout. These are due upon entrance to class tomorrow.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Frida Kahlo

    Written By: Lisa Cordova-Nemer
    Grade Level: 9-12

    Time Allotment

    3 Class periods

    Overview

    With the use of a variety of websites, students will learn about the life of Friday Kahlo. Students will demonstrate their knowledge using Vokis, PBS Learning Media Quizzes, and Kahoot. Frida_Kahlo_-Lisa_Cordova-Nemer.doc

    Subject Matter

    Spanish; Art

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of Friday Kahlo in the target language.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • Symbaloo web page: https://www.symbaloo.com
  • A site that includes all the links necessary to complete this unit
  • eMaze presentation: http://emaze.com
  • This will be the introduction to the unit.
  • PBS Learning Media: http://pbslearningmedia.org
  • From this site, students will be able to watch the video ‘’The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo”
  • Voki: http://www.voki.com
  • I will provide the instructions using a Voki and then students will create their own Voki demonstrating their knowledge learned from the video.
  • Kahoot: http://kahoot.com
  • Students will demonstrate their knowledge of Frida Kahlo competing with their fellow classmates
  • Materials

    1. Computer and projector for the teacher.
    2. A computer for each student. If working in groups, students could share a computer.
    3. Handout for note taking while watching the video.

    Teacher Preparation

    • Create a Symbaloo with all of the websites needed for the unit.
    • Create a presentation using eMaze.
    • Create and copy the note taking handout for the video.
    • Create quizzes using the PSS Learning Media. Do this in Lesson Builder.
    • Create a Kahoot testing students’ knowledge of Frida Kahlo

    Introductory Activities

    The introductory activity is Day 1 of the Unit.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. Provide Symbaloo to students so they have access to all of the sites at all times.
    2. Students will watch the eMaze presentation – answering questions as we go throught the presentation.
    3. Students will watch the video about Friday Kahlo on PBS Learning Media.
    4. While watching the video, students will take notes on the important aspects of the video.
    5. Students will take the quiz on PBS Learning Media that was have created using the Lesson Builder.

    Day 2
    1. Students will review their notes taken from Day 1.
    2. Share the Voki that was created to introduce the instructions
    3. Students will create their own Voki – a character that will demonstrate their knowledge to the rest of the class.
    4. Once the Voki has been created and published, students will then copy and paste their Voki website address on a Google doc so that other students are able to see. The link to the Google doc can be posted on the Symbaloo site.

    Day 3
    1. Students will listen to the Vokis created by other students.
    2. Students will play Kahoot, testing their knowledge of what they have learned from the video and the Vokis.

    Culminating Activity

    The Kahoot is the culminating activity. It is a fun and competitive way for students to see how much they have learned from this unit.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • Art – Students could create art that has similar qualities to the art of Frida Kahlo.
    • Social Studies – Students could learn about the political happenings during the life of Frida.

    Community Connections

    Students could research local art exhibits to see if there are any that relate to her work or other works of surrealist or Mexican painters.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Coded messages

    Written By: Brock Stenberg
    Grade Level: 9-12

    Time Allotment

    2 class periods.

    Overview

    To introduce the students to patterns and coded messages. Coded_Messages_Brock_Stenberg.doc

    Subject Matter

    Algebra

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to code messages and decode messages using algebra.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Link to Sherlock Holmes short story, “Adventure of the Dancing Men” YouTube video of coded messages with Algebra.

    Materials

  • Devices for the students to read the short story or copies of the short story.
  • Projection capabilities for youtube video/student with devices to watch themselves.
  • Teacher Preparation

  • Link to the Sherlock Holmes’ short story “Adventures of the Dancing Men": http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/178/the-return-of-sherlock-holmes/3228/chapter-iii-the-adventure-of-the-dancing-men/
  • Worksheets for the coding: http://www.activityvillage.co.uk/codes
  • Youtube video about coding: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YLZ_c6roJSo
  • Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Talk about the coded messages on my phone/online banking.
    2. Read the short story “Sherlock Holmes’ Adventures of the Dancing Men.”

    Learning Activities

    Day 2
    1. Watch you tube video.
    2. Go through examples of coding and decoding a message.
    3. Have students finish the worksheets.

    Culminating Activity

    Talk about breaking codes in wars. For example, Navajo in WW2, Bletchley Park in WW2, the Nazi’s enigma.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    History and Language Arts teachers could be included in an interdisciplinary unit.

    Community Connections

    IT people may have some insight as well as bankers for encryption.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Carbon Dioxide - Is It Good or Bad?

    Written By: S. Anderson
    Grade Level: 9-12

    Time Allotment

    Five 50-minute class periods

    Overview

    This lesson would fit in nicely in an 11-12 grade chemistry class. The lesson could take place when studying combustion reactions or around the observance of Earth Day. The students will check for prior knowledge, develop an understanding of greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide, understand how carbon dioxide levels are changing, and what scientists are proposing to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

    carbon_dioxide_sally_anderson.docx

    Subject Matter

    Chemistry

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
    • develop an understanding of greenhouse gases, including carbon dioxide
    • understand humans’ part in the production of carbon dioxide
    • understand what is currently being done to address the carbon/carbon dioxide issue
    • be able to navigate through media sources
    • hypothesize ways to reduce our carbon footprints

    Media Components - Video/Web

    PBS Learning Media:


  • Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/kqedcl11.sci.ess.atmosphericcarbondioxidelevels/atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-levels/
  • Global Warming: Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.eco.greenhouse/global-warming-and-the-greenhouse-effect/
  • Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/kqedcl11.sci.ess.atmosphericcarbondioxidelevels/atmospheric-carbon-dioxide-levels/
  • NOVA ScienceNOW: Capturing Carbon: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/nsn08.sci.ess.watcyc.capcarbon/capturing-carbon/
  • Carbon Lab: The Habitable Planet: A Systems Approach to Environmental Science: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/77f21459-8d5e-46e9-a7e1-347e209cf4ea/77f21459-8d5e-46e9-a7e1-347e209cf4ea/
  • Managing Carbon Dioxide Video: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/bf08d5fa-57da-4bd0-94bd-a3f1c32c555b/managing-carbon-dioxide-the-geologic-solution-documentary/
  • Dan Daly Presentation, Part 1: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/372e3e5a-423f-4071-8d33-c1f80b2e2e6b/pcor-eerc-dan-daly-presentation-part-1/
  • Dan Daly Presentation, Part 2: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/3c031e45-dbcb-4dc3-9037-71982dc69346/dan-daly-presentation-part-2-energy-pcor-eerc/
  • Materials

    • Internet connection
    • Projector
    • Student Packet –
      1. Clue Into Climate Assessment
      2. Background Article
      3. Page for Discussion Questions #1 – first video clip
      4. Media Literacy Sheet
      5. Page for Discussion Questions #2 – second video clip
      6. Data Table for interactive activity
      7. Note taking page for Managing Carbon Dioxide Video
    • Poster board
    • Colored Pencils
    • Markers
    • Teacher Preparation

      All digital media can be found through the PBS Learning Media Site. Bookmark this site and organize all of your clips, videos, activities, etc. within the site. It is awesome! Make copies of all parts of the student packet and prepare the packets ahead of time. The students should be given the entire packet at the beginning of this lesson.

      Introductory Activities

      Day 1
      1. Students will first take the Clue into Climate Assessment individually using only their knowledge base.
      2. Greenhouse Gases: Background Article will be passed out. After reading the article, they may change any answers they would like.
      3. As you go over the correct answers, have students correct their own papers and encourage discussion.
      4. Have students preview the discussion questions for the video clip.
      5. Show the video clip – Global Warming: Carbon Dioxide and the Greenhouse Effect
      6. Students should go over discussion questions in groups of 3-4.
      7. Notes should be taken on the discussion questions.
      8. Assign the media literacy worksheet as homework.

      Day 2
      1. Discuss the media literacy worksheet.
      2. Display the graph from Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels
      3. Discuss the graph.

      Learning Activities

      1. Have students preview the discussion questions for the video clip.
      2. Show the video clip – NOVA Capturing Carbon
      3. Students should go over discussion question in groups of 3-4.
      4. Notes should be taken on the discussion questions.


      Day 3
      1. All students should have Internet access.
      2. Students should go to the Carbon Lab: The Habitable Planet: A Systems Approach to Environmental Science.
      3. As students do the simulation, they should record data into the data table.

      Day 4
      1. Watch video – Managing Carbon Dioxide.
      2. Take notes on things that they may want to put into their poster.

      Culminating Activity

      Day 5
      1. Each discussion group of 3-4 students should make a poster board.
        • Each student should do a part and attach it to one poster board.
        • Thought should be given as to what the discussion group thinks is important for their particular age group to know.
      2. Each discussion group will be assigned a class/group to make a poster for. (Examples: K-6 classrooms, school hallways, school office, and sites within the community)
      3. As students are working on their posters, play Part 1 and Part 2 of the Dan Daly Presentation Video

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      History – Create a time line of related topics – energy use, carbon dioxide emissions, etc.

      English – Write and possibly perform a skit discussing alternative forms of energy and present to other classes.

      Community Connections

      Brainstorm as a class ways to get the local community to reduce their carbon footprint. Students should then decide upon a project that could be done in the community and follow through as a group.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Breaking Point!

    Written By: Jolene Hermanson
    Grade Level: 6

    Time Allotment

    2 weeks

    Overview

    Students will learn about the strength of certain geometric figures. They will use this information to design and build tables and bridges. They will discover the four different types of bridges built.

    breaking_point_Jolene_Hermanson.doc

    Subject Matter

    Math, Science, STEM

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will be able to identify the 4 different types of bridges.
    • Students will draw models of what they want their final design to look like.
    • Students will determine what geometric figure has the most strength.
    • Students will be able to use the engineering design process: ask, imagine, plan, create, and improve.
    • Students will become problem solvers, critical thinkers, and team players.
    • Media Components - Video/Web

    • Build a Bridge: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/phy03.sci.phys.mfw.buildbridge/build-a-bridge/. This interactive activity from NOVA highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various bridge designs. It then challenges you to put your knowledge to the test by situating the right type of bridge in each of four different scenarios.
    • Tacoma Bridge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mclp9QmCGs
    • Why the bridges failed: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/tech/bridge-collapse.html
    • Materials

      • Tower building - 9 sheets of typing paper per group of 2 and tape
      • Table Top Build – 1 piece of cardboard 8 ½ inches by 11 inches, 4 pieces of newspaper, and 18 feet of duct tape per group of 2
      • Gum Drop Bridge- 100 toothpicks, 40 gum drops per group of 3 or 4

      Teacher Preparation

      • Cut out 8 ½ in by 8 in cardboard for table top
      • Count out toothpicks and gum drops for lab

      Introductory Activities

      MATERIALS:
      (remember to number each step) 9 sheets of typing paper, tape

      Tower Building – test 3 columns of circular, triangular, and rectangular pillars. Make 3 pillars of each geometric shape.
      1. Start with making the 3 circular pillars.
      2. Place close together and test to see how many paperback books it can hold.
      3. Record your data.
      4. Next test the triangular pillars.
      5. Test to see how many paperback books it can hold and record the data. Lastly, make and test the rectangular pillars.
      6. Again record your data.
      7. Look at the data collected. Students should see that the circular shape is the strongest.

      Learning Activities

      MATERIALS:
      8 ½ x 12 in cardboard, 18 ft duct tape, 4 sheets of newspaper

      Table Top – Design challenge for students. In group of 3 or 4 students challenge them to make a table top the is 8 inches tall using only 4 sheets of newspaper, 18 feet of duct tape, and cardboard. I give the tape 3 feet at a time.
      1. Decide on teams
      2. Draw a sketch in pencil of what you want the table top to look like.
      3. Hand out equipment. I would give student s rulers and scissors too.
      4. Teams have 45 minutes to build table.
      5. Any changes to the design must be noted in pen on your drawing.
      6. (usually the next day) test tables. It should hold 1 math book for 30 seconds.
      7. Test 2: See how many math books the table can hold. I do one table at a time and whole class watches. We record the data on the board. If there is a tie, I go by the table with the less weight.
      8. Discussion: Does your table look like a bridge?
      9. I show the video of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge failure and the 35 – W collapse.
      10. I also show pictures of the new 35-W bridge. It was built with lights that change color to make it beautiful. Why would an engineer build a bridge to that? I google to find the pictures. They are on my computer at work.
      11. We look at the top table to see what they did.
      12. Students can try building again to see if they can improve on their design.

      Culminating Activity

      MATERIALS:
      100 toothpicks, 40 gumdrops

      Gum Drop Bridges
      1. Decide on the groups to build an arch gum drop bridge.
      2. Sketch what you want the bridge to look like.
      3. Hand out supplies. Bridge must span 6 inches in not touch the desk.
      4. Students have 45 minutes to build.
      5. When ready, they can test their bridge using rolls of pennies and nickels to test. As soon as they see it collapse, they can take the weight off. They go back to their area to redesign.

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      For this activity, I will take the class to the computer room. Build a Bridge: http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/phy03.sci.phys.mfw.buildbridge/build-a-bridge/

      Use the Nova Build a Bridge site to learn about the 4 different types of bridges. Do survey the sites, do your homework. In the do your homework, you will need 1 by 11 in cardboard strips, cut sponge with 4 hard cover books, and rope for the try it part. After done with do your homework, play the game.

      Community Connections

      We will have and engineering company visit the class to talk about how they make decisions when building projects.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: ¿Bienvenidos a Cuba?

    Written By: Elizabeth Berreth
    Grade Level: 9-12

    Time Allotment

    1 50 minute class period plus outside class time to complete culminating activity

    Overview

    Students will interact with Pear Deck and PBS Learning Media to learn about the lifting of the U.S. embargo on Cuba and how it will affect Cubans and Americans. Students will demonstrate their understanding of the variety of perspectives involved via creation of a speaking avatar.

    Bienvenidos-a-Cuba_Elizabeth_Berreth.doc

    Subject Matter

    Spanish

    Learning Objectives

    1. Students will experience Cuba through video.
    2. Students will be able to discuss the evolving relationship between the U.S. and Cuba.
    3. Students will identify positive and negative aspects of American tourism in Cuba.
      1. Media Components - Video/Web

        Video
        PBS News Hour, June 15, 2015: “Shift In U.S. Policy Opens Cuba To American Tourists”

        Web sites/multimedia tools:
        • Pear DeckPear Deck is a web-based interactive presentation tool that allows teachers to present material and students to view the presentation and provide responses using their own devices.
        • PBS Learning MediaPBS Learning Media is a free online service that houses videos, images, documents, audio files, lesson plans and more for educators. It also allows educators to create and store multi-media, interactive lessons for students.

        Materials

        The teacher will need a device (laptop, iPad, etc.), projector and aux cord for sound. Students will need individual devices and internet access. If students will be watching the video on their own devices, they should also have headphones.

        Teacher Preparation

        1. Create your introduction to the lesson using a slideshow in Pear Deck
        2. Create a PBS Learning Media account and search for the video by PBS News Hour, from June 15, 2015: “Shift In U.S. Policy Opens Cuba To American Tourists”. Click on the heart icon to add this video to your collection of favorites on the PBS Learning Media site.
        3. If you wish to create an interactive lesson for students, locate the “Dashboard” on PBS Learning Media and select “Tools”, then “Lesson Builder”. View the tutorial to help you create your lesson. Here is the student view of the lesson that I created: PBS Learning Media Lesson Builder
        4. Create a speaking avatar at Voki to introduce the culminating activity.
        5. Bookmark peardeck.com and pbslearning.org
        6. Make sure that all students have a device that is connected to the internet.

        Introductory Activities

        In my Pear Deck slideshow, I show students a picture of modern-day Cuba with vintage cars and run-down colonial buildings. Students will be logged into the Pear Deck session on their devices and will be prompted to guess what year it is in the picture and where the picture was taken. Then, they will see a map of the Caribbean, including Florida, Mexico and other Caribbean islands. Students will be asked to guess how many miles Cuba is from the United States. On the next slide, students will see the same map and will be asked to tell which countries on the map they themselves or people they know have visited. Students will then theorize why Cuba is so near to the United States yet so very few people they know have traveled there. They will then be sent directly to PBS Learning Media via their Pear Deck session.

        Learning Activities

        1. Log into Pear Deck, PBS Learning Media and voki.com
        2. Begin presenting the Pear Deck session and ask students to follow the instructions on the screen to log in.
        3. Lead students through the introductory activity and facilitate any discussion that emerges.
        4. Assist students with technological difficulties and answer questions while wandering the room, monitoring student progress.
        5. Allow students to continue on to PBS Learning as prompted by the Pear Deck slide show but make it clear that they should stop and wait for the class after completing the pre-viewing questions. The previewing questions ask students to define terms that will be used in the video: socialism, embargo and infrastructure.
        6. Discuss the pre-viewing questions to be sure that students have a clear understanding of the terminology.
        7. Have students preview the questions that they will be answering after the video. The questions include:
          1. Why have Americans been unable to visit Cuba?
          1. How was the Cuban economy affected by the fall of the Soviet Union?
          1. How would you describe attitudes toward Americans in Cuba?
          1. How will an increase in American tourism affect Cuba?
          1. Why might Cuba be cautious about more American tourism?
        8. Keep the lights on and project the video for the entire class rather than having students watch on their individual devices to avoid the distraction of sound coming from multiple devices. Ask students to progress through the lesson, answering the questions as they go.
        9. Allow students to review the video on their own devices as needed to answer the questions. Headphones are very helpful for this step.
        10. Introduce the culminating activity with your own voki avatar. Assist students as they create their vokis.

        Culminating Activity

        Students will create a speaking avatar using Voki .They will be randomly assigned a role from some of these possible options.
        1. A Cuban teenager
        2. A 40 year old Cuban bed and breakfast owner
        3. An American teenager
        4. An 80 year old American
        5. An 80 year old Cuban
        Students’ task will be to explain, from the perspective of the role they have been assigned, how they feel about the opening of Cuba for American tourists. They should explain their position and support it with reasons. 6. A 35 year old Cuban-American Students’ task will be to explain, from the perspective of the role they have been assigned, how they feel about the opening of Cuba for American tourists. They should explain their position and support it with reasons.

        Cross-Curricular Activity

        Social Studies – Geography, History: The Cold War, Bay of Pigs, Soviet Missile Crisis, Imperialism

        Community Connections

        Students can plan a trip to Cuba either with family or an organization. They can interview Cuban-Americans to learn about their perspectives of the Cuban-American conflict and its impending resolution. Students could keep up to date on current events about Cuba and changes in the U.S. laws.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Be An Energy Owl

    Written By: Julie Fietek
    Grade Level: 5

    Time Allotment

    Five (50 min.) class periods

    Overview

    THE STUDENT WILL: KNOW how electricity is created in the region by lignite coal. (process), UNDERSTAND how electricity gets to his/her home (transmission) and how to be a wise steward of this natural resource (conservation), DO In collaboration as a small group become an expert in a specific topic area regarding lignite coal and present that knowledge to the class.

    Be_An_Energy_Owl_Lesson_Plans.docx

    Subject Matter

    Science

    Learning Objectives

    1. In continuation of the chapter's learned vocabulary, review the terms renewable and non-renewable. List both categories on the board and have students come up w/examples of energy sources that are renewable and non-renewable.
    2. Quick Sketch (pre-assessment) - give each student a piece of paper and have them draw a map of how electricity gets to their house. Allow only a few minutes to complete.
    3. Share with a neighbor. Ask students to share their sketches with a neighboring student and explain it. Have a few students share their sketch with the whole class.
    4. Hold up a piece of lignite coal and ask, "What energy source am I holding in my hand?"
    5. Pass around pieces of lignite coal for students to observe and describe physical properties.

    Materials

    Lignite DVD resources available from Lignite Energy Council, computers, internet access, lignite coal & ash samples, materials for cake pan mining activity, Home Energy Use worksheet, and Energy Wise activity sheets. Additional resources available from: Prairie Public and PCOR Partnership.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Native American Winter Counts

    Written By: Mary Dalzell
    Grade Level: Elementary but adaptable for all grades K-12

    Time Allotment

    I Unit with 5 lessons: approximately 2 hours per lesson

    Overview

    Winter Counts are pictorial records of Native American History. Students will learn the how Winter Counts was the visual record used by the Lakota to record the history of their daily life.

    2015_Native_American_Winter_Count_Media_Rich_Lesson_Plan.doc

    Subject Matter

    Social Studies, Math, Literature, Science and Visual Art.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will understand that there are many diverse cultures and that different peoples use many different styles and forms to record their history. Students will learn about the practice of making winter counts among some Native American groups. Students will study the Lone Dog Winter Count. Students will learn about history keeping in various cultures. Students will understand how storytellers use pictographs as storytelling devices. Students will create pictograph cards illustrating their own life. Students will create a water color painting using pictographs within a Native American sun painting as well as create a “buffalo” pictograph and berry dye paintings.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Materials

    1. Examples of pictographic records
    2. Student Journals
    3. Brown craft paper or Brown paper bags
    4. Pencils, Sharpies, erasers
    5. Various Oil Pastels or Tempura Paints
    6. Water Color Paper
    7. Water Color Pans
    8. Paint Brushes
    9. Containers for Water
    10. Various berries and fruits

    Teacher Preparation

    • Power points prepared
    • Websites saved
    • Art materials ready

    Introductory Activities

    SETTING THE STAGE: MATERIALS: Computer
    • Students will be shown various power points on Winter Counts.
    • Students will also be shown websites on Winter Counts as well as handouts of pictographs.
    • Emaze Water color presentation
    Students Materials:
    • Lone Dog Pictographs Handout
    • ANSWERS SHEET FOR LONE DOG PICTOGRAPHS HANDOUT list above:
    • __L__ 1. The Nez Perces came to Lone-Horn’s lodge at midnight. 1852–53
    • __K__ 2. White soldiers made their first appearance in the region. 1823–24
    • __I__ 3. Plenty of buffalo meat. 1845–46
    • _B__ 4. Eight Nakotas were killed. 1863–64
    • _ G__ 5. La Framboise, a Canadian, built a trading store with dry timber. 1817-18 __D 6. The Nakotas killed a Crow woman. 1857–58
    • __F_ 7. The Nakotas made peace with the Cheyennes. 1840–41
    • __E_8. Buffalo belly was plenty (food, clothing and other materials). 1816–17
    • __C_ 9. Buffalo were so plentiful that their tracks came close to the tipis. 1861-62
    • __A 10. Four-Horn was made a calumet or medicine man. 1856–57
    • __J_ 11. There was a remarkable flood in the Missouri River and a number of Indians were drowned. 1825–26
    • ___H 12. The whooping cough was very prevalent and fatal. 1813–14 L

    Learning Activities

    • Native American Sun Painting
      1. Students will design their own symbols which have meaning to them.
      2. Students will use compasses to create make circle shapes on their papers.
      3. Students will also add their personal symbols to the outer circle. Students will add flames and lines which extend into the background of the picture.
      4. Students will also use patterns with their symbols.
      5. Students will outline their pictures with sharpies.
      6. Students will use various painting techniques to create their pictures.
      7. Students will recognize warm and cool colors.
      8. Students will use Dry/ Wet on Wet/ and Salt textures techniques.
    • “Buffalo” Hide Pictographs:
      1. Students will design their own symbols which have meaning to them from the past year.
      2. Students will draw their symbols on the brown craft paper which has been torn to resemble a buffalo skin.
      3. Students can outline their symbols with sharpie.
      4. Students can add color with oil pastels or various tempura paints.
    • Winter Count Dyes:
    • During this activity the students will learn about natural dyes/pigments used to draw images on winter counts. The students will crush fruits and berries and then they will use the juice/dyes produced to paint cotton swatches. Setup/Process
      1. Collect the materials.
      2. Crush the fruits/berries in separate bowls (remove the large pieces, leaving the juice).
      3. Cut an old white sheet into 4”X4” cotton swatches.
      4. Use a brush or cotton swab to paint a 1 inch diameter circle on the cloth. Each dye should have a separate cotton swatch.
      5. Wait 10 minutes and then check for clarity (sharpness – defined edge) and deepness (range from dark to light).
      6. Using a chart, mark clarity and deepness for each sample. Use a scale of 1-10, 10 being the sharpest and deepest.
      7. Wash each sample in a mild mixture of water and dishwashing detergent. Wash each sample for 10-15 seconds. The scrubbing force, duration and action for all of the samples should be the same.
      8. Place the swatches on paper towels to dry or hang dry. Let samples dry for 5-10 minutes.
      9. Using the chart, mark clarity and deepness for each sample. Use a scale of 1-10, 10 being the sharpest and deepest.
    What to expect: The students should realize that natural dyes work very well. Many of the fruits/berries tested will remain in the cloth for extended periods of time. The students may have experienced staining their clothing while eating fruits/berries. The students should also conclude that winter count images are durable but they can be prone to fading/breakdown over time due to environmental influences. Winter counts need to be protected to preserve clarity and deepness. Extension: Each student could select an additional item like ketchup, mustard or chocolate syrup to test. Also, the natural dyes could be compared to compounds like permanent marker or tee-shirt paint.

    Culminating Activity

    MATERIALS: Gallery or wall space Students will have a gallery show in which they will display their Native American artworks.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. Social Studies:Native Americans History Lesson Recording the Past and the Future
    2. Science: Winter count Dyes and Berry Painting
    3. Math: Creating a Timeline
    4. Reading:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnJcQTbf_8Q">The Birch Bark House
    5. Art: Native American Sun Paints
    6. Music: Native American Singer
    7. Background Information: Winter Counts
    8. Winter Count Unit: Grade Level: K-2
    9. Winter Count Unit: Grade Level: 3-5
    10. Winter Count Unit: Grade Level: 6-8
    11. Winter Count Unit: Grade Level: 9-12
    12. Elementary, Middle School and High School Lesson Plans
    13. Lesson Plan Connections for Elementary, Middle School and High School Students

    Community Connections

    Parents and family will be invited to join the class for a gallery show of their artwork.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Why is carbon called the duct tape of Life?

    Written By: Angie Bartholomay
    Grade Level: 10-12

    Time Allotment

    2-3 50 minute classes

    Overview

    This activity is a hands on lesson in which students will use their knowledge of bonds to build models and draw Lewis structures for common compounds. By building the models students will be able to visualize an otherwise difficult concept. Using the models, Lewis structures and VSEPR model students will determine the shape or geometry of the molecule.

    Carbon_-_Duct_Tape_of_Life_Lesson.doc

    Subject Matter

    Chemistry

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will apply knowledge of bond types
    • Students will build models of common molecules
    • Students will learn to draw Lewis structures
    • Students will learn to determine molecular geometry using the VSEPR model
    • Students will determine molecular polarity
    • Students will identify ways chemistry impact our everyday life

    Media Components - Video/Web

    http://www.npr.org/news/specials/climate/video

    Materials

    worksheet, molecular modeling kits or chemsketch software and computers, lecture power point

    Teacher Preparation

    Run off worksheet, collect molecular modeling sets or download Chemsketch software on the computers and familiarize yourself with how the program works.

    Introductory Activities

    INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY - SETTING THE STAGE: MATERIALS: video and molecular modeling set
    1. We have just learned about forces that hold molecules together remember those are intermolecular forces or more specifically chemical bonds.
    2. We have learned that we can use electro-negativity differences to determine bond types and determine dipole moments that exist.
    3. We also have learned how to draw a Lewis Structure.
    4. Today we are going to apply what we have learned as we build models of some common molecules.
    5. As we watch this 1st video clip I want to listen for the answers to the following questions; (put the questions on the board or use the slide in the power point so students can write the questions down)
      1. Why is carbon called the “Duct Tape of Life”?
      2. What are some examples of how chemistry is important to our everyday lives?
    6. Show video; Episode 1

    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS: molecular model set
    1. When the video is over discuss the answers to the questions from the introductory activity.
    2. Ask the students to open their molecular modeling set. Explain the color scheme for the set or use the power point slide.
    3. Ask the students to select two hydrogen atoms from their set and a wooden dowel which will represent a bond.
    4. Ask the students to look at the hydrogen atom. How many places are there for the hydrogen atom to bond? (1 hole = 1 bond)
    5. Build a hydrogen molecule using the wooden dowel to represent the bond between two atoms. (Show them yours)
    6. Now let’s draw a Lewis structure in the space provided. (Draw the Lewis structure on the board or show the next slide in the power point)
    7. Ask- What kind of bond exists between the atoms?
      1. Nonpolar covalent because the difference in electro-negativity is zero
    8. Is there a dipole moment?
      1. No, there is no positive or negative end to the molecule
    9. What is the geometry?
      1. We will use the VSEPR theory. ( show the slide or use a chart) Since there are only two atoms involved there is only one choice. Linear.
    10. The bonds are non-polar but what about the molecule? Is there a positive region and a negative region? No
      1. The molecule is non-polar
    11. Show episode 2 – Tell the students, continue to list ways that chemistry is important in our every day lives as well as the properties of methane.
    12. What did you learn about methane?
    13. Lets build a methane molecule. What will we need?
      1. 4 hydrogen atoms
      2. 1 carbon atom
      3. 4 bonds
    14. Draw the Lewis structure. What kinds of bonds exist? (polar covalent)
    15. Is there a dipole moment? (Yes carbon has an electronegativity of 2.5, hydrogen 2.1 so the arrow points toward carbon), indicate it with arrows in your structure.
    16. What is the geometry? (tetrahedron)
    17. What is the molecular polarity? Non-polar, so even though the bonds are polar the molecule is non-polar due to is geometry.
    18. This next compound has received a great deal of attention in the media, carbon dioxide. Once again I want you to continue listing ways that chemistry is important in our everyday lives and is carbon dioxide?
    19. Show episode 3. After viewing discuss what is carbon dioxide?
    20. What do we need to build a molecule?
      1. 2 oxygen atoms
      2. 1 carbon atom
      3. chemical bonds
    21. Ok, Let’s build the molecule. In order to complete all of carbon’s bonding places what kinds of bonds will we need? (double bonds with oxygen)
    22. Draw the Lewis Structure and indicate any dipole moments.
    23. What is the geometry? (linear)
    24. Is the molecule polar or non-polar?
    25. Continue building the molecules on the activity sheet, drawing Lewis structures indicating dipole moments where present. Then using VSEPR model determine the geometry of the molecule and the polarity Of the molecules.
    26. Assign each lab group a molecule that they will share with the class So they can keep the model that they built. Explain that when they share with the class you want them to be able to do the following;
      1. drawn the Lewis structure, name bond types & dipole moments
      2. name the geometry and molecular polarity
      3. describe how the molecule is important in their everyday lives

    Culminating Activity

    1. Call on each group to present the results they found about each molecule. As each group presents, the rest of the class should be checking the work that they did. These presentations could be media format.
    2. Ask, how many ways were you able to put on you list for ways that chemistry is important in our everyday live?
    3. I am going to ask each group to give a different impact then call on each set of students to list off what they have heard. They can not give one that has already been given by another group. This could be listed on the board, poster or bulletin board.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. art – drawing molecules
    2. language arts- writing
    3. speech – group’s sharing results
    4. technology- group sharing or use of chemsketch to build models

    Community Connections

    Awareness of increasing CO2 levels in the atmosphere and how the chemicals are important in their everyday lives will help make them better stewards of these resources.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Energy: “Then and Now” How Energy Resources Effects our Environment

    Written By: Mary Dalzell
    Grade Level: 5th Grade (can be adapted to grades 6-8)

    Time Allotment

    4-50 Minute Class Periods:

    Overview

    Student will view a 2 Part Video series PCOR 4 Education Presentation: Part 1 “Energy” and Part 2 “Carbon and Energy”

    Subject Matter

    Art, Science

    Learning Objectives

    Students will understand the history of how energy use affects our everyday life styles in the past and present.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Links to videos for this lesson include:

    PCOR Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership

    Energy Information Links and Slideshow

    Glossary from Energy Kids

    PCOR Video Clip Library

    Materials

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    1. Sketch Books
    2. Pencils
    3. Paper
    4. Sharpies
    5. Color Pencils
    MATERIALS:
    1. Videos
    2. Power point
    3. Word Bank with definitions
    4. Poster Board (For Timeline)
    5. Pencils, Sharpies, Markers
    6. Computer

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Book mark Websites
    2. Notes on Videos
    3. Sample Timeline Drawing
    4. Art supplies for Timeline

    Introductory Activities

    1. Students will view video on Part 1 on Energy
    2. Students will discuss energy and how we use energy today
    3. Students will do practice timelines in sketch books to formulate ideas

    Learning Activities

    1. Day 1: View Video 1
    2. Group discussion on video
    3. Work in sketch book on timeline
    4. Day 2: View Video 2
    5. Group discussion on video
    6. Work in sketch book on timeline
    7. Day 3: Begin work on Actual timelines
    8. Sketch out times (check for Accuracy)
    9. Add Sharpie
    10. Day 4: Add color and finalize details of Timelines

    Culminating Activity

    1. Class Critique on Timeline Artworks
    2. Display of Artworks

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Language Arts: Students will write about Energy usage “Then and Now”

    Community Connections

    Students will discuss how energy can be conserved at school and at home.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Tapestry of Cultural Codes

    Written By: Margaret Johnson
    Grade Level: 4th grade

    Time Allotment

    4 class periods at 50 minutes each.

    Overview

    By our choices to communicate in one way instead of another, we convey important social meanings. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the use of signs and symbols (communication) in creating a code by incorporating art with math, social studies and literacy. Students will produce interesting works of art that can be displayed to show their understanding.

    Subject Matter

    Visual Art with connections to Math, Social Studies and Literacy

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
    • be able to kinesthetic/hands on create a story or secret coded quilt
    • will study a brief history of textile art in North America, with a focus on quilting
    • use various art techniques to create an example of a traditional art form—quilt making

    Materials

    Avervision Document Camera, Projector, HP computer, Internet access. MATERIALS: Session One/Setting the Stage
    • Various colors of construction paper, 9x12
    • Opt. School Smart brand “Quilt Mosaics” precut paper squares and triangles
    • Black construction paper (opt. colored), 12x15
    • Pencil and eraser
    • Scissors
    • Oil pastels or construction paper crayons
    • Glue
    • Stapler
    • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best)
    • Small precut fabric squares for paper quilt border
    • Tape
    • Videos
    • Prints
    • Tar Beach book by Faith Ringgold
    • Show Way by Jacqueline Woodson
    • Pieced Symbols quilt Blocks from the Global Village by Myrah Brown Green
    MATERIALS: Session Two/Learning
    • Same materials as in session one (continuation)
    • Art prints and books available.
    MATERIALS: Session Three and Four/Learning/Culminating Activities
    • Same materials as before needed to complete the project
    • Art prints and books available.

    Teacher Preparation

    PREP FOR TEACHERS: Preview and set up media components.
    • Computer
    • Avervision (document camera)
    • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
    • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
    • Screen or wall on which to project images
    Prepare materials – Prior to starting unit Gather materials so each student has the following:
    • Colored construction paper-various colors, 9x12 (1/student)
    • Black (or other color) construction paper, 12x15 (1/student)
    • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
    • Scissors (1/student)
    • Oil pastels or construction paper crayons (variety of colors) Opt. color theories: cool (blue, green, purple) and warm (red, orange, yellow), OR complementary colors (red/green, orange/blue, or yellow/purple), add white to add a tint of a color.
    • Elmers Glue (1/student or share)
    • Stapler (1/table of 4 students)
    • Small precut fabric or paper squares for paper quilt border ( variety)
    • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best) (1/student)
    • Tape (1/table of 4 students)

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1 Overview of unit:
    • Students will learn about the history of communication in different cultures, learning about how Secret Codes were infused within artwork as a way of communicating.
    • Students will learn about the Thirteen Colonies in the 1600’s-quilts covering their beds –quilts consisted of congruent shapes cut from small pieces of cloth which were from clothes too tattered to wear.
    • Students will learn about cave drawings, Aboriginal drawings and Native American signs and symbols. Students will compare the Secret Codes in different cultures. If one sign or symbol had one meaning in one culture, when judged according to the another communication had a different meaning.. These are cultural differences. They are systematic, they are learned, and they are important.
    • Students will create story quilt square using their own signs and symbols within their artwork.
    • In doing so, Math, Social Studies, Language Arts and Visual Arts will be integrated into this unit of study
    Activities View: Communication Timeline http://www.historyofinformation.com/expanded.php?category=Communication Day 2 Demonstration to begin our learning activities. Pass out materials: (4 students per table)
    • Colored construction paper (student color choice) 9x12 (1/student)
    • Opt. precut quilt paper
    • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
    • Rulers (1/student)
    • Oil Pastels (share one box of variety of colors) opt.
    Demonstrate as students follow along:
    • Discuss and show examples of story quilts (secret coded) and other examples that show communication.
    • Discuss ideas of stories that visually tell incorporating their own signs and symbols within quilt design.
    • Demonstrate drawing; sketching lightly, filling 80% of page from top to bottom/side to side. Terms: Background, midground, foreground (for story quilt only) Use geometric shapes for secret coded quilt square.
    • Show examples of color choices (opt. primary, secondary, cool/warm, complementary)
    • Demonstrate how to use oil pastels or coloring tools by using little movements, pressing hard to create layering colors – mixing/blending and building up surface texture.
    • Students work
    • Clean area/put papers in drying rack.

    Learning Activities

    LEARNING ACTIVITIES: Day 3 and 4 Pass out materials:
    • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
    • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best-1/student)
    • Scissors (1/student)
    • Elmers Glue (2/table)
    • 12x15 black or your color choice construction paper for border of quilt square.
    • Have quilt pieces (pre-cut or student cut) available for border design.
    • Pass out papers to students.
    Demonstrate
    • Review previous instructions
    • Introduce how to finish quilt
    • Work day to complete quilt square.
    Explore
    • Consider adding embellishments on top of your quilt square.
    • http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/7685/preview/ Navajo and math…..#30, an interactive site creating tessellation and symmetry.
    • http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/Tessellate/ interactive site to create tessellations on computer.
    Day 5 (if needed):
    • Finish quilt square
    • Explore more!
    • Display quilt squares when completed.
    Discussion: In looking at the finished quilt squares: (opt. questions to ask)
    • Color choices and why?
    • What secret code did you use?
    • Which one would you like to have and why?
    • Which one would sell the most if for sale?
    • How come?
    Discussion Topics
    • Textile Arts
    • World craft/art form
    • Native American signs and symbols used in different tribes and why.
    • Early quilts/textile art forms can be found back in history.
    • Other examples of communication and how they used it.

    Culminating Activity

    CULMINATING ACTIVITY: After creating the hands-on artwork assignment(s), students will: (Visual Art)
    • Display finished artwork within their school.
    • Share and reflect with peers.
    • Each student can verbalize about their artwork using academic terms (terms to be taught in a given course)
    • (Social Studies)
      • Identify the location/region of cultures studied or represented.
      • Explain how background and history influence people’s actions (e.g., farming methods, hunting methods, economic decisions)
      • Explain the contributions of various ethnic groups (e.g., Native Americans, immigrants) to the history of North Dakota (e.g., food, traditions, languages, celebrations)
      (Math)
      • Use a variety of strategies to solve problems; drawing pictures to plan out finished artwork.
      • Describe the attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Identify, describe, and model (e.g., using straws or other materials) parallel, perpendicular, and intersecting lines and line segments

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      CROSS-CURRICULAR ACTIVITY:
      • Visual Art – Create a simple story quilt square using paper
      • Social Studies – A characteristic of significant features of different cultures
      • Math – Draw pictures to solve problems, describe 2D and 3D shapes.
      • Language Arts – Write to understand and improve comprehension.

      Community Connections

      COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS: Students in ND and northern MN can relate to many of the artworks found at these museums in Fargo, ND and Moorhead, MN. The exhibits change throughout the year, so I am providing these links that could be used to preview and select an art work that will complement the lessons. (Art works always need to be previewed for appropriateness before displaying them for students.)
      • Visiting with ELL teachers in your school.
      • Lutheran Social Services
      • Charism program in Fargo Public Schools

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Weaving Along

    Written By: Margaret Johnson
    Grade Level: 4th Grade (may be adapted to other elementary grade levels)

    Time Allotment

    4 class periods at 50 minutes each. Further exploration of these concepts can go into additional class times.

    Overview

    Incorporating art with math and social studies inspires students to observe the world around them. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of weaving, as well as produce interesting works of art that can be displayed to show their understanding. Once items are created students will role play the “olden” days of bartering their wares.

    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan

    Subject Matter

    Visual Art with connections to Math and Social Studies

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to kinesthetic/hands on create a simple weaving. Students will be able to barter their wares.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Links found in Downloadable Lesson Plan, which can be found under the Over View Section.

    Materials

    • Different colors of construction paper, 10x16
    • Black construction paper, 12x18
    • Pencil and eraser
    • Scissors
    • Tempera Paint (opt.)(paper plates, brushes, water containers-opt.)
    • Glue
    • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best)
    • Tape
    • Videos

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Preview and set up media components.
      • Computer
      • Avervision (document camera)
      • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
      • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
      • Screen or wall on which to project images
    2. Prepare materials – Prior to starting unit Gather materials so each student has the following:
      • White drawing paper (80 lb.) or water color paper, 10x16 (2/student)
      • Black construction paper, 12x18 (1/student)
      • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
      • Scissors (1/student)
      • Tempera Paints (variety of colors) Opt. cool (blue, green, purple) and warm (red, orange, yellow), OR complementary colors (red/green, orange/blue, or yellow/purple), add white to add a tint of a color.
      • Brushes (one per student)
      • Water containers (1 per table of 4)
      • Paper plates to put paint on
      • Elmer’s Glue (1/student or share)
      • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best) (1/student)
      • Tape (1/table of 4 students)

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1

    1. Overview of unit: • Students will learn about the word, barter. • Students will create a weaving. • Students will learn about the history of bartering • Students will learn about the history of weaving • In doing so, Math, Social Studies, Language Arts and Visual Arts will be integrated into this unit of study
    2. Activities View the video (entire video or continue viewing throughout lesson times or a video clip), “SaturdaySancocho (the meaning of barter) http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?SearchText=barter&lid=7411464&ID=355984&player=13 • View and research art prints about weaving • Explore books on weavings • Explore books and other sources on bartering. • Show examples of handmade weavings if possible • Create their own weaving • Barter their wares when weavings are completed.
    Day 2

    Demonstration to begin our learning activities.

    1. Pass out materials: (4 students per table) • White drawing (80lb) paper or watercolor paper, 10x16 (1/student) • Paint • Water containers to clean brushes • Brushes • Paper plates for paint
    2. Demonstrate as students follow along: • Discuss and show examples of weavings • Show examples of color choices (cool/warm, complementary, tints) • Demonstrate painting of 2 papers - pattern painting/color mixing/adding white to create tints. • Students will paint 2 papers - opt. color schemes (1 cool, 1 warm), complementary (red/green, blue/orange or yellow/purple) with white as a tint for mixing colors on each page. • Clean area/put papers in drying rack.

    Learning Activities

    Day 3
    1. Pass out materials: • Tape (1 roll/table of 4 students) • Pencil and eraser (1/student) • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best-1/student) • Scissors (1/student) • Elmers Glue (2/table) • 12x18 black or your color choice construction paper for border of weaving. • Pass out painted papers to students.
    2. Demonstrate
      a. On back side of paper 1 (your choice), draw a 1 inch ruler wide line across top with pencil. To create the warp (up and down parts of a weaving), draw 5 or 6 wavy or straight lines from the ruler line to the bottom edge of paper, spacing as uniformly apart as possible
      b. With scissors, cut on pencil line (warp) up to ruler line.
      c. On back side of paper 2, create the weft lines by drawing 6 wavy lines across and numbering the right side of the paper 1 through 7 strips. This will help in weaving the artwork together in the proper order.
      d. Cut 1 weft at a time/weave through the warp. Cut #2 out/weave through the warp etc. until all 7 strips have been woven together. There will be a little extra left on strip #7– cut and trim it or leave as is. Glue this last trip in place and mount onto the 12x18 construction for your finished product.
    3. Explore
      a. Consider adding embellishments on top of your weaving
      b. Laminate and actually use it as a placemat.
    Day 4 and Day 5 (if needed):

    Discussion:
    In looking at the finished weavings: (opt. questions to ask)
    • Color choices and why?
    • Which one would you like to have and why?
    • Which one would sell the most if for sale?
    • How come?
    View: History of bartering: http://bizkids.com/clip/profile-bartering Discussion on how to barter (trade)
    • Time to Barter your wares!


    Discussion Topics

    A. Weaving – basket weaving, clothes
    B. World craft/art form
    C. Early weavings can be found back in history.
    D. Bartering today and past

    Culminating Activity

    After creating the hands-on artwork assignment(s), students will:

    Visual Art
    • Display finished artwork within their school.
    • Share and reflect with peers.
    • Each student can verbalize about their artwork using academic terms (terms to be taught in a given course) (e.g. parts of a weaving: warp (up and down) and weft (left to right)

    Social Studies

    • Identify the location/region of cultures studied or represented.
    • Explain how background and history influence people’s actions (e.g., farming methods, hunting methods, economic decisions)
    • Explain the contributions of various ethnic groups (e.g., Native Americans, immigrants) to the history of North Dakota (e.g., food, traditions, languages, celebrations)
    Math
    • Use a variety of strategies to solve problems; drawing pictures to plan out finished artwork.
    • Describe the attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Identify, describe, and model (e.g., using straws or other materials) parallel, perpendicular, and intersecting lines and line segments

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • Visual Art – Create a simple weaving using paper
    • Social Studies – A characteristic of significant features of different cultures/how bartering was and is used today.
    • Math – Draw pictures to solve problems, describe 2D and 3D shapes.
    • Language Arts – Write to understand and improve comprehension.

    Community Connections

    • English Language Learners professionals in your school ( many cultures barter)
    • Hjemkomst Center: http://www.hjemkomstcenter.com/‎ The Heritage Hjemkomst Interpretive Center, commonly known as the Hjemkomst Center, is an interpretation center museum in Moorhead, Minnesota
    • Clay County Historical Society http://www.hcscconline.org/‎ The Clay County Historical Society was established in Moorhead, Minnesota, in 1932 to collect, preserve and disseminate the history of Clay County. Collections
    • The Rourke Art Museum: http://www.therourke.org/
    • Plains Art Museum: http://plainsart.org’exhibits/ Students in ND and northern MN can relate to many of the artworks found at these museums in Fargo, ND and Moorhead, MN. The exhibits change throughout the year, so I am providing these links that could be used to preview and select an art work that will complement the lessons. (Art works always need to be previewed for appropriateness before displaying them for students.)

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Poetry in the Clouds

    Written By: Melinda Crimmins
    Grade Level: Grades: 9-12

    Time Allotment

    One-three weeks

    Overview

    This Unit introduces students to a wide variety of styles and forms of poetry to read and write. Students will find, explore, and reflect on a poem that speaks to them in some way. They will present and record their favorite poem in a video project patterned after My Favorite Poem Project. Students will then write their own poems and hold a Poetry Slam, as a culminating project.

    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan
    Web Sites
    Wrire an Instant Life Lesson

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts, Technology

    Learning Objectives

    This lesson will introduce students to poetry by asking them to find a poem that speaks directly to them in some way. This kind of introduction should allow students time for exploration, response, and reflection. It will present the art as something worth reading and enjoying outside the classroom and as something valuable to share with others. Allowing students to explore poems independently and informally may help them appreciate more structured or formal poetry lessons. Through the process, the students may define for themselves what poetry is. The lesson will also strive to foster a respectful environment for student expression. The most important element is to encouraging students' personal connections to poetry, first through modeling favorite poem presentations and then by asking them to share ideas with each other.

    Students will practice and become familiar with reciting & writing poetry in many forms, demonstrate knowledge of poetic devices by using them in their original poems, use computers and the Internet to learn about poetry, gain experience and confidence in group interactions and in their ability to write & recite poetry as well as interview and record others.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Web Links attached in Lesson Plan found in Overview under Downloadable Content

    Materials

    • Internet
    • Video Recording Device
    • Poetry Web site handout (attached pdf)

    Introductory Activities

    1. Ask students how many kids like poetry? (There may be a few groans). Then ask how many like music (most all hands will raise). Go around and ask kids what types of music they like. Do their parents like music? What types of music do their parents like? It should be a general agreement that most people like music. However, music is a very broad term. Some may like to play, some listen to, some sing. The genre of music may be different; it may be country, classical, classic rock, modern rock, heavy metal, rap and so on. Just as “music” is a general term so is “poetry”. Explain to students that there are just as many time periods, and types and ways to enjoy poetry as there are ways to enjoy and appreciate music. They just need to find the type and way they can enjoy poetry.
    2. Hang signs in three corners of the room. The signs will read: "listening", "reading", and "doing". Then ask students to think about which one of these three words describe the way they learn and relate to the world. When they have decided, ask them to stand in the appropriate corner. Have students take note of where they are standing. Point out that this may say a lot about how they feel about poetry. Auditory learners, "Listeners", might enjoy poetry by reading it aloud, hearing the author or someone else read and interpret the poem, or listening to the lyrics of songs. Visual learners, "Readers", might enjoy poetry as a private experience or by reading it out loud to someone else. Kinesthetic learners, “Doers", might like to write and perform poems.
    3. Inform student that they will be participating in a poetry unit where they will be finding, reading and recording their favorite poem, writing their own original poetry and participating in a poetry slam.

    Learning Activities

    1. First is a Wordle poem. Have students go to www.wordle.net and type in 3 adjectives that describes themselves, their name three times ,3 talents ,3 activities they love, three important people, 3 descriptive emotions. Then have students create their world “poem art” You could create a Group wordle using Poll anywhere and copy and pasting into Wordle as a demonstration. Later in the unit the teacher could use Poll anywhere and ask the class to send three positive adjectives to describe a student . Then see if the class can figure out whose worlde is describing who in class. (Teacher has access not to accept responses)
    2. Explain the concept of My Favorite Poem project. You can gather more information from the web site, My Favorite Poem Project.
    3. As a model for sharing favorite poems show some Favorite Poem videos to help inspiring the students' choice of poems.
    4. Discuss what the camera brings to the reading of a poem. (change in face, voice, gestures) The same way one can witness pleasure and intensity in the face and movement of a musician singing or playing a song, one can gain things by watching the reader of a poem.
    5. Inform the students that they will be recording themselves as well as one other community member reciting their favorite poem. Making videos of students saying poems aloud will emphasize the significance of poetry as a vocal art. The emphasis should not be on performance but on the experience of saying a poem one loves aloud. First, students will have to find a poem that means something to them. Distribute the poetry web page handout.
    6. Once students have found their favorite poem instruct student on the videos. The videos should include each student speaking briefly about a poem's personal significance and then reading the poem aloud on camera.
    7. Pair students, having one act as videographer while the other reads, then switch roles.
    8. As a homework assignment have student record one community member reading their favorite poem.
    9. When each student has two videos upload them to the school web page for a community poetry archive. Or create a Virtual Poster using glogster.edu ( or glogster.com)

    Culminating Activity

    1. Cover poetry devices and forms: Direct students to http://www.poetrysoup.com/poetry_terms/ Use this page to start a discussion on the definition of a poem.
    2. Poetry writing (individual or group): have students to try their hands at a poem. Allow them to choose a theme such as love, pets, or friendship and challenge them to write at least three short poems on the same subject using three different forms. You might suggest an online rhyming dictionary as a tool such as rhymezone.com or rhyme.lycos.com. You may also direct students to the online poetry forms to create “instant” poems at http://ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm
    3. Introduce the mechanics of a poetry slam: To learn more about poetry slam competition, students should visit the National Poetry Slam web site, http://www.poetryslam.com/
    4. The slam: A class session will be used for the poetry readings. Students will judge the poets numerically as Olympic ice skaters are judged. Students will be judged from "0" to "10". These numbers will be placed on cards for the five randomly chosen (student) judges to hold up. Another student will average these and keep an official score card. The teacher may decide on prizes for the winner.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    The same way that the Favorite Poem Project videos create a portrait of the United States through the lens of poetry, videos in schools can make a lasting portrait of a particular class. If teachers choose to make the videos a yearly assignment, the school will eventually have a large, valuable archive, which could be made available to all students for viewing on the web or a cd.

    History: activities could connect to poems to specific time periods.
    Technology or Publishing: use flipsnack for favorite poems
    Drama: A student reads a poem several times while other students silently dramatize the action of the poem.
    Music: Students could find a song that represents the overall meaning of their favorite poem and create a video.
    Art: Wordle poems and/or the Glogster virtual posters

    Community Connections

    Community film project of My Favorite

    Students could hold their "poetry slam" class meeting in a local restaurant or coffee shop.

    Students could attend/participate in an actual poetry slam. (Check the links above to find poetry slams in your area.)

    Local Poet Laureates or other writers could be invited to speak, or even to listen and comment on the students' poetry.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Mighty Mouse Will Save The Day!

    Written By: Sue Geihl
    Grade Level: Middle School

    Time Allotment

    This lesson is done in one 50 minute period. However, you could add days for: reviewing, or having students create their Superhero in another art form, or having students present their Superhero to the class.

    Overview

    Students learn that artists and scientists are creative people. They learn about terrestrial sequestration.
    They create their own terrestrial sequestration superhero.
    Students write an artist’s statement about their superhero.
    They present their superhero to others through the arts.

    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan
    Note Taking Sheet
    Super Hero Worksheet
    Mighty Mouse Slides
    Might Mouse Artist Statement

    Subject Matter

    Science, Visual arts, theatre, music, dance, language arts

    Learning Objectives

    Students will know:
    • carbon dioxide is in our atmosphere
    • we need to reduce this carbon dioxide
    • terrestrial sequestration is nature’s way to removes carbon dioxide
    Students will use this knowledge to create a superhero who lives in one of the following areas: forests, wetlands, prairie, or farmland. Students will write an artist’s statement about their superhero. * Students will present this information to others using an art form of their choice.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Cole the carbon talks about the carbon cycle (YouTube Link)
    Videos about terrestrial sequestration divided into clips so you can show small 1-3 minute videos

    Materials

    • Slide Show Mighty Mouse Will Save the Day (Keynote and exported into PPT and PDF) Terrestrial Sequestration note taking sheet -one per student
    • Black round beads - one per student
    • Red round beads- two per student
    • Jewelry pin- one per student
    • String 1 yard long - one per student
    • 1/8 inch wooden dowel around 6 inches long - one per student (they could share this) Terrestrial Sequestration Superhero work sheet- one per student
    • Art materials such as markers, colored pencils, crayons to add color to cartoon Additional materials depending on what method students use to present their super hero Artist statement- one per student

    Teacher Preparation

    Prior to teaching this lesson, start by searching the videos and lesson plans on Prairie Public site to introduce the students to the topic of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The Mighty Mouse lesson can stand on its own, but there are other resources you can use to lead into this lesson.

    • Watch the slide show with the video clips. Websites are listed if you have trouble viewing the slide show
    • Fill out the note taking sheet while watching the videos....helps you to make references to the students.
    • Create your own Terrestrial Sequestration Superhero and fill out the sheet to see if there is any other information you would want the students to think about

    Introductory Activities

    Slide 1 When students enter the room have Mighty Mouse on the screen from the slide show. As class begins ask how many students have seen Mighty Mouse? If you have the ability, play the sound track for Mighty Mouse.

    Slide 2Read or choose students to read the information out loud. Ask what they know about carbon dioxide.

    .

    Learning Activities

    Slide 3- Play video with Cole http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xz0fn81BlIQ During the video hand out the note taking sheet.

    Slide 4- Review the information from Cole by talking about the carbon cycle for plant and animals

    Slide 5- Have students discuss with a partner what they think terrestrial sequestration is. Ask for definitions from the students

    Slide 6- Definition http://www.undeerc.org/PCOR/videogallery/default.aspx Clip: What is Terrestrial sequestration?

    Explain that they should jot down facts about each of the areas while viewing videos. These fact will play an important part in their final assignment. You can also prompt them from the notes you took while watching the videos. Slide 9- Forestation http://www.undeerc.org/PCOR/videogallery/default.aspx Clip: Reforestation in Brazil Have students share their facts with their neighbor

    Slide 10- Prairie http://www.undeerc.org/PCOR/videogallery/default.aspx Clip: Sequestering Carbon in the Prairie During the video hand out the cups with the beading materials

    Slide 11-When the video is done, guide students through the beading process

    Slide 12- Talk about how they can reduce the amount of Carbon Dioxide they put into the atmosphere.

    Slide 13- Refer back to their note taking sheet and show the video on wetlands http://www.undeerc.org/PCOR/videogallery/default.aspx Clip: Sequestering Carbon on the Prairie

    Slide 14- Show video on farming http://www.undeerc.org/PCOR/videogallery/default.aspx Clip: No-Till Farming and Carbon Storage

    Slide 15- Have students write their own definition of terrestrial sequestration on their note taking sheet and show the review video

    Slide 16-Refer back to Mighty Mouse and the beginning or the lesson

    Have students jot down ideas of why there are cartoons. What is their purpose? List the ones that you came up with and see if student have thought of more. Hand out the TSS (Terrestrial Sequestration Superhero) worksheet

    Slide 17- Introduction to the assignment: stress that they need to educate the viewer about carbon dioxide and how their TSS will save the day!

    Slide 18-19 Show students examples of Superheroes

    Slide 20-21 Guide them through the worksheet

    Slide 22 Sketches of how to draw starting with simple stick figures and adding geometric shapes to fill out the figure. Emphasize it does not have to be in human form.

    Hand out artist’s statement and have students attach it to their work sheet.
    Students spend the rest of the period working on sheet and begin drawing their TSS. Reemphasize that their TSS is going to save the world by removing carbon dioxide in the air. Students need to complete his sheet and their artists’ statement. It can be assigned as homework or you could provide them time in class the next day.

    Culminating Activity

    Before leaving ask the students to come up with a variety of ways that they could introduce their TSS to other students.

    Slide 23- Use this slide to demonstrate all of ways they could teach about their character. Ask for show of hands of the method they would like to use. Who would like to draw a comic? Write a story with illustrations? Write a song / rap? etc. All of the arts are represented here: visual arts, music, theatre, dance, media Have them think about it over night.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Student will be using science to learn about carbon dioxide, the carbon cycle in nature, terrestrial sequestration, visual arts to create their superhero, language arts to write their artist’s statement. The students would also have a choice to use language arts in writing a story, dance, theater, music, and media arts if the lesson was extended.

    Community Connections

    Students could present their superhero to the other students in their class. They could also present to other students in the school or teaming with a younger buddy. Students could present to people in the community or exhibit their work during a family night at school. They could also have their work exhibited in community buildings or local businesses.


    ****
    If you have time in your curriculum you could have each student choose their method to demonstrate their TSS. This could be assigned as homework, work alone or work with a partner in class. Additional materials would be needed as well as time for the students to present to the class.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: “Minnesota History: Putting the Puzzle Together Piece by Piece”

    Written By: Nancy Jacobson
    Grade Level: In MN the state social studies standards say to teach Minnesota Studies in grade six, but this lesson could be adapted for any age group.

    Time Allotment

    One 50 min. class period to introduce the lesson and decide on the “Puzzle Pieces” for each student or pairs of students. Second class period used to disperse Glogster login information and tinker with the tools. This would keep the interest high for the project. Several days would be needed to do the research needed to gather the necessary information, graphics and videos. At least two more class periods for students to create their Glogs and to practice presenting them. Depending on how many students you have, you may choose to have the students present their “MN History Puzzle Pieces” to the class so that all begin to see the bigger picture surrounding Minnesota’s history. If you choose not to have students do presentations, it will cut down on the class time needed, but add to the individual teacher’s time to view and correct each Glog. In summary, six days at least for the creation of the Glog and then additional days if the students present them in class. Time allotment will also depend on your students’ Internet search skills. This may be a skill you need to teach or reteach in order for them to be successful. I have provided some information to help you with that piece.

    Overview

    This lesson is intended to be an exciting and creative way to explore Minnesota history and to share it. The teacher can make the decision if students should work alone or in pairs. This project is a practical one to do with partners. Each student or pair receives a topic and is responsible for developing two or three questions delving into Minnesota’s past on that particular topic. The questions should answer the what, how and why it happened. Using search skills and evaluating their sources (Internet, books, articles, etc.), they find the evidence needed to identify possible answers to their questions. Using this information they draw conclusions and create a “Glog” using GlogsterEDU. This will serve as their presentation to their peers.

    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan
    Article

    Subject Matter

    Subject areas include social studies, reading - language arts and technology.

    Learning Objectives

    After students have the topic (puzzle piece) they are to explore, the first task is to develop at least three questions focused on what happened in Minnesota’s past and how and why it happened. The students should be able to discover multiple sources and different kinds of historical evidence related to their questions. They will also analyze their sources’ credibility and identify possible answers. Their data will provide them with the evidence to draw their own conclusions and finally create their Glog which will be their primary tool in presenting their findings.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Glogster EDU: A complete educational solution


    Locating the Mississippi: Landscape, Nature, and National Territoriality
    at the Mississippi Headwaters Written by Rich Heyman
    American Quarterly, Volume 62, Number 2, June 2010, pp. 303-333 (Article)
    Published by the Johns Hopkins University Press
    DOI: 10.1353/aq.0.0137 (See attached PDF on flashdrive)


    MN Department of Natural Resources Itasca State Park
    URL: http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/itasca/index.html

    "Cradle of the Father Waters" - 1938 video clip available on YouTube.com


    Minnesota Legacy Productions(These are links that are clickable through the downloadable Lesson Plan found in the Overview section)
    Prairie Public Broadcasting – Itasca State Park
    URL: http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/itasca-state-park
    Other MN Legacy Productions (videos) that could be used:
    Runestone Museum
    Phelps Mill

    Minnesota Historical Society: History Education MN
    Minnesota History Topics
    Researching History: What Are the Steps?

    Itasca State Park - Wikipedia
    Where to Go – Explore Minnesota
    Itasca State Park – National Register Listing
    University of MN Human History|College of Biological Sciences
    Visit the Itasca State Park in Minnesota
    Our World-Class State Park System | Conservation Minnesota
    Photos Itasca State Park
    Photos from PhotoBucket of Itasca State Park

    Materials

    To view this lesson on Glogster EDU, you will need a projector hooked up to your computer and a screen or whiteboard to project it on. You also want your audio hooked up for the presentation. You are welcome to use my Glogs. The URLs are listed below: For the Introduction to the project the URL is www.campergirl.edu.glogster.com//mn-history-assignment For my example of using Itasca State Park as a topic go to www.campergirl.edu.glogster.com/mn-history-itasca-state-park/ Most of the materials I have listed above under Media Components. Ideally each student should have their own computer or laptop. If you do not have an EDUcator Premium account on Glogster EDU, you can register for an EDUcator Free account by going to www.gloster.com and clicking on the green “I WANT IT” button. This will take you to their pricing page. I strongly recommend the purchase, as there truly is not a similar tool available at their prices. To sign up for a free 30 day trial scroll down towards the bottom and click on the words “Free Version PLUS a 30 Day Premium Trial.” Glogster: The Visual Network Player App by Glogster for the iPad only has the ability to view and not create. Hopefully it will not be long and there will be an app out. If you have access to the MN Volunteer magazine put out by the MN DNR, it would be an excellent written resource for young people to use. One could also scour the media center/library for any materials on MN History. If using images from a book or magazine, you will need a scanner hooked up to a computer the students can use to file the downloaded images. Students can take their notes on note cards, paper or via the computer. There is a wide assortment of MN history topics on the MN Historical Society web page. See the link above under Media Component.

    Teacher Preparation

    First of all you will want to familiarize yourself with creating a Glog. After you have signed up for an account there are video tutorials on their site to guide you. When I introduce my students to a new Web 2.0 tool, I usually allow them time to “play around” on their own first to familiarize themselves with all the bells and whistles. Most students catch on quite fast and are eager to help others. It is extremely helpful for your students to be able to go to a web page created by their teacher with all the necessary links for a project available to them. If you do not have your own homepage, may I suggest creating a page on portaportal.com. It has proven itself to be a tool students love that makes their lives and yours easier in the computer lab! You are welcome to visit myportal. Just click on the link above and on the right-hand side of the web page there is a space for a guest to login. Simply type “njacobson” and it will take you to my portaportal site. I have bookmarked GlogsterEDU, MN Historical Society and PBS Our MN Legacy sites. If you plan to use this for a lesson involving MN history, I strongly recommend you visit the MN Historical Society’s page on history topics to decide if they are suitable for your students. It could easily be adapted for United States history, which is an MN Academic Standard in Social Studies for grade 5. This is also the case for North Dakota. At this time it would also be a good idea to ask your media specialist to compile a list of books that she thinks would help the students in their searches. Perhaps the books could be kept on a cart and stored right in your classroom.

    Introductory Activities

    INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY: SETTING THE STAGE
    1. Before introducing this lesson we would have just completed a series of lessons on MN’s state symbols, listened to the state song, and created something using the symbols.

    2. Hand out a sheet of paper and tell the class to try and remember as many of the state symbols and such that they just learned about. Tell them to write them down in a list. Inform them that this is not a graded piece.

    3. Before class begins you should have open on your teacher desktop or laptop the Glog, “MN History Assignment”. It is now time to introduce the video to the class. Say, “We have just finished our study of MN’s state symbols, so as you watch this short video clip put a check mark by each of the symbols you listed on your paper. Jot down a note if you have a question or concern about any of the pictures shown. Put your pencil down when you are finished so I know when to move on.”

    4. Click on the play arrow in the frame of the first video (under the assignment note). Once the video has begun, click the small arrowed square in the lower right-hand corner of the screen to enlarge the viewing screen. Adjust your volume. “Hail Minnesota” plays in the background throughout the clip. Many times I will play a video clip twice. Your students will tell you.

    5. Have a show of hands as to how many of the symbols they actually had on their paper that matched the ones on the clip. Go over any scenes that there may be a question about.

    6. Tell them that you have created their assignment using a Web 2.0 tool called Glogster and what you have created is called a Glog. Be sure to show your enthusiasm and excitement! Let them know that it will be their task to complete their assignment as a Glog also. “Each student will receive their own Glogster account. We will be using it throughout the school year.” Draw their attention to the note, “Assignment: Create a Glog about a topic in Minnesota History.”

    7. Point above the red box and say, “Each one of you (or pairs) will pick a piece of the puzzle to Minnesota history. As a class, when you have completed your tasks, we will come together to watch and listen to all the Glogs as we put our puzzle of Minnesota’s history together.”


    Materials

    2. Paper and pencils

    3. Teacher computer hooked up to projector to view and listen to the video clip on GlogsterEDU. This could be done while the students are writing down the symbols.

    4. GlogsterEDU MN History Assignment
    Keep the video clip open, as you may need it to go over any scenes in question.
    6. Steer their attention to the yellow sticky note on the Glog. Draw their attention to the red letters above the red box and all the puzzle pieces on the Glog.

    Learning Activities

    1. Now is the time to go over the nuts and bolts of the project with your students. Begin by elaborating on each of the numbered tasks in the red box. Fill in the gaps with examples.
    2. “I will take you to a web site that will help you narrow down the topic. You will also have a chance to take a look at a Glog I have begun with Itasca State Park as my topic.”
    3. “My questions were: What and where is Itasca State Park? Why was it chosen as MN’s first state park? & how did it all come together?”. “I must tell you that a felt like a super sleuth as I did my research and found historical evidence on something that may shock you!”
    4. "Once you have narrowed down your topic, it is time to give a lot of thought to your questions. Remember to ask what, why and how questions to best share the history of your Minnesota topic.”
    5. “When you believe you have your questions nailed down, please raise your hand so that I can look them over with you.”
    6. “Remember to use your good searching skills.” (If you have not gone over this with your students, I would suggest using Google’s Search Education on the web. This would involve numerous class periods, but in the end I believe it is well worth it.) “You are welcome to use the library books on the cart as well.”
    7. Remind students that their searches for the answers to their questions should include images, as well as text. They may even find a video clip. It is important that they give credit to the sites or authors whose work they use in their research. I use the site EasyBib: Free Bibliography Generator which is fast and easy.
    8. The students will need at least two to three 50 minute class periods to gather and evaluate their evidence. They will need to take notes either on paper/note cards or use a Word doc. They will also need time to sort through their sources to find the evidence and analyze it so that they can draw some conclusions to their questions.
    9. You may find it useful to set up appointments with students once they claim they are “done.” This way you can determine if the proper steps were taken and if their questions are indeed answered!

    Culminating Activity

    1. Give students the code they will use to register and walk them through the registration process using your interactive white board.
    2. Allow time for them to explore the site; look at glogs posted on the Glogpedia, discover the Tools and use them. I believe 15-20 minutes is adequate to acquaint themselves with the site. Hand out the Requirements and Rubric sheets & tell students to refer to them often and put them in their folders.
    3. By the end of two more class periods you should have some students that are finishing up. It is my practice to have students do a peer critique on each other’s project. A checklist with the requirements listed can be made up for this if you wish to go that way. As the teacher, make the time to view each Glog with the student narrating it.
    4. Give students one more class period to finish up. Those that are completed can serve as “Techies” and help students that require it. This frees up your time to be viewing the Glogs.
    5. Plan to begin presentations on the 4th day. It may be sooner or later for you depending on your students. For those students that are not done, I tell them they need to make time over their recess time or plan to stay after school to complete their Glog. You want them listening and watching during the presentations.
    6. Students should be taking notes while their peers are presenting their Glog. You can point out important points as the presentations are given.
    7. Post each of the Glogs to your Homepage so parents and others may view them.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. One activity may be for students to choose one of the places mentioned in the MN history Glogs and plan a family trip using their math skills to calculate the costs involved and the mileage.
    2. This could also tie in with an art project. Use your creativity!
    3. Perhaps there s a historic place close enough to arrange for a field trip. If you have the cameras available, tie in a lesson on photography and have students take photos while on the trip.
    4. Another possible area would be geography and mapping. This could be done using technology or doing it by hand. The places mentioned in the Glogs would be put to a map.

    Community Connections

    1) A visit to your county’s museum would be a fun and interesting trip to get the students excited about history.
    2) Invite elderly community members to come to your classroom and talk to the students about their past. Have a question and answer time and perhaps students could make invitations and plan refreshments.
    3) Invite your local newspaper reporter to visit your class while they are in the midst of creating and presenting their blogs.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: How To Be Centered

    Written By: Julie Costello
    Grade Level: 6th Grade (but appropriate for 4-8)

    Time Allotment

    1 -10 class periods, 45 minutes in length as determined by topic and teacher.

    Overview

    Students will use skills and knowledge that they have learned while learning about China to investigate and apply other knowledge about China using Multiple Intelligences and a variety of Learning Styles.
    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan
    Sheet Chinas Great Wall.docx

    Subject Matter

    Social Studies, Art, as determined by centers teacher develops.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will understand how traveling to a region introduces you to a multitude of learning experiences and builds on what you know about a place prior to visiting.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    China's Great Wall

    Materials

    • Worksheet: China’s Great Wall
    • Powerpoint

    Teacher Preparation

    • Bookmark website or use Powerpoint
    • Make copies of Center sheet
    • Get supplies for any/all Centers

    Introductory Activities

    We have been learning about China and how exciting would it be to get to now visit China? What might we learn that we don’t already know? Would knowing some things help us enjoy our trip? Why?
    While I would love to take all of you to China, we just can’t do that, so I am hoping we can explore more about China in a new way
    • travel with a friend
    • choose what to explore, can’t do everything; prioritize share what we learn

    Learning Activities

    • for students: The Great Wall while built to protect China, now needs protecting
    • for teachers: how to design and have centers in your class

    Culminating Activity

    • Share
    • Invite others in as students share reflections on their “trip”
    • Write summary of what was new learning happened
    • Display of favorite learning activity/pair

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • variety of learning activities included in Centers determines outcomes
    • include stories or folklore, scientific discoveries, art, architecture, miles to get there etc.

    Community Connections

    • Speakers on a variety of subjects could be recorded and become part of a center
    • Students could do research and create a center using their new knowledge and share it with others according to their interests

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Every Picture Tells a Story

    Written By: Sue Geihl
    Grade Level: Grades 5 and up

    Time Allotment

    One day for presentation. Time outside class to collect items. Time in or out of class to write a story, make a collage, or create a piece of art. One day for presentation of work.

    Overview

    Students will compare and contrast artwork created by two native American artists, Laura Youngbird and David P Bradley using a venn diagram. They will create a story about one of the images and verbally share it. They will view interviews with Laura Youngbird and learn what impacts her art. They will discuss the meaning of assimilation and how it can be defined in a work of art. They will examine and search for the stories each artist is telling in their artwork. Students will tell their own story.

    Downloadable Content
    Lesson Plan
    Slides for EPTAS
    Venn diagram

    Subject Matter

    Visual Arts, Language Arts, Histrory

    Learning Objectives

    Students will learn:
    Students understand the meaning of assimilation.
    Artists tell stories in their art without using words.
    These stories can educate the viewer about the artist and the world.
    Students can tell their own story with or without words.

    Materials

    Keynote “Every Picture Tells a Story”
    Venn diagram handout with Laura Youngbird and David P Bradley
    Extra paper
    Pencils.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Watch the keynote and make notes for your presentation
    2. Make a list of questions or prompts you may want to use for students
    3. Make copies of venn diagram.

    Introductory Activities

    1. (Slide 1) Play the first part of the keynote with the artwork of Contemporary Native American artists.
    2. While students are watching hand out venn diagram.

    Learning Activities

    3. (Slide 2) Give students about 3 minutes to fill out diagram
    4. Have students share what is the alike in the two paintings
    5. (Slide 3) Give students about 3 minutes to write a short story about one of the images on the back of their paper
    6. Have students share with a neighbor their story.
    7. (Slide 4) Show the video clip of Laura Youngbird
    8. (Slide 5) Discuss the vocabulary words of sketchbook and collage
    9. (Slide 6) Talk about Assimilation, give students time to write down other examples of cultural assimilation
    10.(Slide 7) Discuss the way in which Laura define assimilation in her art
    11.(Slide 8) Invite students to talk about what they see in this painting
    12.(Slide9) Show the video clip of Laura talking about her grandmother
    13.(Slide 10) Invite students to talk about what they see in the painting and what Laura meant by “being white”
    14.(Slide 11) Students share what they learned from Laura’s art
    15.(Slide 12) Students discuss what they see in David P Bradley’s self portrait
    16.(Slide 14-­‐15) Students talk about what they see in the images
    17.(Slide 16) Talk about the boarding schools and what effect it had on Native American children. Refer to the actual photos and the images that Davide P Bradley used in his collage.
    18.(Slide 17) View the video clip of Laura’s “Ghost Dance” bison

    Culminating Activity

    Review information students learned about during the keynote.
    19.(Slide18-­‐19) Inspire students to create their own story. They can use words and write the story, or they can transform those words into images such as Laura Youngbird and David P Bradley.
    20.(Slides 20-­‐21) writing prompts

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    History:
    Students could research assimilation of Native Americans more thoroughly. There are videos with interviews of people who attended boarding schools. Students could compare and contrasts native Americans to other immigrants or native residents who have been assimilated. Reading/Writing:
    Students could read one of the suggested books in and write a response to the book. A Broken Flute The Native Experience in Books for Children Edited by Doris Seale and Beverly Slapin Students could read about boarding schools and compare them to their own school. Students could write a personal response about how they think they would feel if they had to attend a boarding school. Students could interview family members about their history. Students could research their family culture and write a short story and possibly illustrate it. Media Arts:
    Students could research a different Native

    Community Connections

    Students could interview people in the community and in their families to accumulate information for their story.
    Students could have a local artist/writer come in and talk to them about their stories and processes they use to tell them.
    Students could present their stories as a class during conferences.
    Students could present their stories individually to members of the community during programs such as “adopt a grandparent” or “reading buddies.”
    Art and stories could be displayed at local businesses, library, post office.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: “Steamboats on the Red”

    Written By: Jan Thompson
    Grade Level: Grades 3-12

    Time Allotment

    3 class periods-30-40 minutes each

    Overview

    1. Students will study the history of the steamboat on the Red River.
    2. Students will be engineers.


    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Powerpoint
    Map of ND
    Worksheet
    Aluminum Bottom Steamboats

    Subject Matter

    Social Studies, Science, Language Arts (Students could write about their steamboat ride, or about being a wood hawk)

    Learning Objectives

    Students will study steamboat history on the Red River.
    Students will make aluminum foil boats.
    Students will test buoyancy and density.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Steamboats on the Red-Chapter 1-2 and Chapter 5

    Materials

    Video-Steamboats on the Red
    Worksheet to go with video

    Teacher Preparation

    Preview video
    Run off worksheet

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Inquiry discussion-How did most people move around the United States in the early 1800s? Students should bring up horseback, walk, Red River carts, horse and wagon, and boats on the river.
    2. Does anyone have any ideas on how they could transport more goods at a faster pace? (Get them to discuss transportation on the river].
    3. Does anyone know what forms of transportation they could use on the river?
    4. Read pages 40-48 – Explorers and Fur Traders in North Dakota-Book is found on the internet.
    5. Power point-slides1-16 going over dangers of steamboats and the vocabulary.

    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS:
    Ask the big question-“How did people move around during the 1800s?”
    Discussion
    Read pages 40-48
    View power point “Steamboats” slides 1-16

    Day 2
    Students will view video-Steamboats on the Red-can be found on Prairie Public web site, and fill out worksheet as they view video. Video will help students retain information.
    1. Using selected segments Chapter 1 & 2
    2. Students will have directed focus to answer questions on the worksheet.
    3. Pause-I will pause the video to discuss pictures and activities on the video.
    4. Slide 18- Students will discuss video and history on it.
    5. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXrY-65EYKk


    Day 3
    Students will become engineers. They will construct the bottom of a steamboat following the engineering activity.
    1. Students will look at pictures of steamboats and discuss their construction.
    2. Students will construct their bottom of a steamboat following engineering art lesson.
    3. Students will try their steamboats in water loading them with pennies for freight.
    4. Students will discuss the winning steamboat’s shape and bottom construction. They will discuss buoyancy and diversity.
    5. Students will write why their boat sank-mentioning construction and area.


    Day 4
    1. Students will use a North Dakota map and put the towns along the Red River on the map.
    2. Students will figure out the mileage on the map and figure out how long a steamboat took to go from one town to the next going 8mph.
    3. Students will discuss the influence steamboats had on the towns along the Red River. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXrY-65EYKk

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    MATERIALS: North Dakota maps and ND outline map
    (remember to number each step)
    Social Studies: Students will use the North Dakota Map and place towns on the map that are along the Red River. They will figure out how long it would take a steamboat to go up the Red River.
    Science: Students will make aluminum foil boats to see how much freight (pennies) their boat will hold.
    Language-They will write about navigating a steamboat up the Red River.
    Write about being a passenger on a steamboat and write about your trip up the Red.

    Community Connections

    Students will go on a field trip to Bonanza Ville to look at the history of steamboats on the Red River.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Show Me the Growth!

    Written By: Susie Fracassi
    Grade Level: Ninth Grade

    Time Allotment

    50 Minutes (with extensions)

    Overview

    This lesson serves as an introduction to a unit based on population growth. Key vocabulary words used throughout the unit are defined and utilized in this lesson. Students will interpret a PBS interactive on world population and make connections to regional population growth. Students will also be introduced to a mapping tool from maps101.com, called Map Sketch.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Human Numbers Through Time
    ND County Population Statistics Report Guidelines

    Subject Matter

    World Geography

    Learning Objectives

    • Students will demonstrate their knowledge of the following terms: doubling time, growth rate, population density, and population distribution.
    • Students will gather information on world population and plot data on a timeline.
    • Students will identify factors that impact where people choose to settle.
    • Students will create a report analyzing population data on two North Dakota counties.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    • “Human Numbers Through Time” – Interactive created by NOVA, made available through PBS.
    • “Map Sketch” – Mapping tool created by maps101.com.

    Materials

    • 6 jars, each one filled with one of the following numbers of M&M’s: 32, 62, 64, 165, 252, 606
    • One world map representing population density
    • One world map representing population distribution
    • Computers, one per student (or one per group of students)
    • Worksheet: Timeline Activity (one per student)
    • Handout: ND County Population Statistics Report Guidelines (one per student)

    Teacher Preparation

    Distribute M&M’s into the appropriate jars, reflecting ND state population over time and world population over time.
    • Arrange jars so that one set has three evenly spaced jars with 32, 62, and 64 M&M’s in each one, respectively. This set should have a sign in front saying: 1 M&M = 10,000.
    • The other set should have three evenly spaced jars with 165, 252, and 606 M&M’s, respectively. This set should have a sign in front saying: 1 M&M = 10,000,000.
    Bookmark the following websites:

    Introductory Activities

    M&M’s in respective jars, world population density map, world population distribution map

    PRAIRIE PUBLIC MASTER TEACHER STRATEGY: Introduce Activities before viewing media to set the stage for learning. Teachers should provide background information and teach new vocabulary words.
    1. As students enter the room, have the M&M’s in respective jars sitting in the front of the classroom. Write on the board, “What do these two sets of jars have in common?”
    2. As a class, discuss the commonalities between the two sets of jars. Ask students what they think may be represented by each set of jars. Use guiding prompts and yes/no questions to arrive at the point that one set represents world population growth and the other represents North Dakota’s population growth.
    3. Use the jars to show the meaning of the following terms:
      • Doubling time: the amount of time required for a population to double in size
      • Population growth rate: the rate at which the number of individuals in a population increases in a given time period
    4. Use the maps (and projector) to show the meaning of the following terms:
      • Population density: the number of people per square unit of land (an AVERAGE)
      • Population distribution: shows the pattern of where people live

    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS: One computer per pair of students, Worksheet: Timeline Activity (one per student)

    PRAIRIE PUBLIC MASTER TEACHER STRATEGY: Direct students’ focus to a specific task to complete during the video.
    1. Assign each pair of students to a computer, hand out the worksheet: Timeline Activity, and direct students to the Human Numbers Through Time interactive (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/earth/global-population-growth.html)
    2. Allow time for students to work through the interactive and record the requested data on the supplemental worksheet.
    3. When students are finished, discuss the following questions as a large group:
      • Where are people choosing to settle?
      • Why are people choosing to settle in those locations?
      • Do we do the same on a local level? Explain.
    (Possible Responses: land use/resources, climate/temperature, accessibility/transportation, physical geography)

    Culminating Activity

    MATERIALS: Computers with internet access (one per student), access to maps101.com, Handout: ND County Population Statistics Report Guidelines (one per student)

    PRAIRIE PUBLIC MASTER TEACHER STRATEGY: Use culminating activities to help reinforce, apply, review, or extend the information in the video clip.
    1. Direct students to the Map Sketch tool found on the webpage, http://www.maps101.com. Once in “Map Sketch,” follow the steps:
      1. Click on “Map Collections”
      2. Click on “Thematic Map Sets”
      3. Click on “State Thematic Maps”
      4. Click on “North Dakota”
    2. Students will use the handout, ND County Population Statistics Report Guidelines, along with the Map Sketch tool to create a report comparing and contrasting two North Dakota counties of their choice.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Potential cross-curricular activities include:
    1. Math – Using population statistics to calculate growth rates
    2. English – Focusing on mechanics when writing the report on North Dakota county population statistics
    3. Science – Researching the environmental issues associated with rapid population growth

    Community Connections

    1. Conduct interviews with citizens in different age categories living in the counties that you chose to analyze. In your report, include anecdotes on citizens’ views on population growth in their home county.
    2. Visit the North Dakota counties studied to enrich report with specific details on items that may contribute to population growth in their county today.


    EXTENSIONS
    1. Utilize the National Geographic Education mapping tool, MapMaker
    2. Interactive “Earth in Perils” created by NOVA, available through PBS
    3. Interactive Quiz “Be a Demographer” created by NOVA, available through PBS
    4. Explore population-related issues at Population Connection (http://www.populationconnection.org/site/PageServer)
    5. Video Clip: The State of the Planet, found in PBS Learning Media
    6. “The World at 7 Billion: A PRB Interactive Map,” available through the Population Reference Bureau (http://www.prb.org/Publications/Datasheets/2011/world-population-data-sheet/world-map.aspx#/map/population)

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Shapes in the World

    Written By: Margaret Johnson
    Grade Level: 4th Grade (may be adapted to other elementary grade levels)

    Time Allotment

    4 class periods at 50 minutes each. Further exploration of these concepts can go into additional class times.

    Overview

    Incorporating art with geometry and social studies inspires students to observe the world around them. Students will demonstrate their knowledge of geometric shapes, as well as produce interesting works of art that can be displayed to show their understanding.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Powerpoint

    Subject Matter

    Visual Art with connections to Math and Social Studies

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to kinesthetic/hands on create a tessellation design

    Media Components - Video/Web

    http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/7685/preview/

    http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1313.html

    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/prairie-public-on-demand/

    http://www.ndstudies.org/

    http://www.ndstudies.org/articles/ghost_dance_movement_spreads

    http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/7685/preview/

    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/content/#taxonomy=Arts&q=shapes&page=1&per_page=20

    http://www.learn360.com/Search.aspx?Subject=9331252&SearchText=geometry

    http://www.brighthubeducation.com/lesson-plans-grades-3-5/63018-teaching-geometry-art-and-shapes/education.state.mn.us/mdeprod/idcplg?IdcService=GET

    http://www.artic.edu/aic/resources/resource/1019

    https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos?q=geometry

    http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/Tessellate/ (need Java script on computer)

    http://tessellations.org/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tessellation

    http://www.andalucia.com/cities/granada/alhamhistory.htm

    Metropolitan Museum of Art: (Islamic Art and Geometric Design) http://www.metmuseum.org/learn/for%20educators/publications%20for%20educators/islamic%20art%20and%20geometric%20design

    http://users.erols.com/ziring/escher_bio.htm

    Video Clips
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=131879&SearchText=art+and+geometry (full 28 min. video).

    Multimedia Tools

    Avervision Document Camera, Projector, HP computer, Internet access.
    Opt. Tessellation art prints by M.C. Escher
    Opt. books from library on Tessellations

    Materials

    MATERIALS: Session One/Setting the Stage MATERIALS: Session Two/Learning
    • Same materials as in session one (continuation of )
    • Watch more of the video continued from day one
    • Art prints and books available to observe
    MATERIALS: Session Three and Four/Learning/Culminating Activities
    • Finish watching 28 min. video
    • Same materials as before needed to complete the project
    • Art prints and books available to observe.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Preview and set up media components.
      • Computer
      • Avervision (document camera)
      • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
      • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
      • Screen or wall on which to project images
    2. Prepare materials – Prior to starting unit Gather materials so each student has the following:
      • Different colors of construction paper, 12x18 (1/student)
      • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
      • Scissors (1/student)
      • Markers, crayons, or colored pencils to add details (variety of colors)
      • Glue (1/student)
      • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best) (1/student)
      • Tape (1/table of 4 students)
      • Index cards with lines on them, 3x5 (pre-cut them to 3 inch square for each student) (1/student)

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Overview of unit:
      • Students will learn about shapes around the world.
      • Students will create the translation (basic type of tessellation), the original shape is created then repeated again and again. The congruent shapes fit together like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle. The shapes never overlap and there are no gaps between them.
      • Students will learn about the history and making of tessellations; symmetrical designs.
      • In doing so, Math, Social Studies, Language Arts and Visual Arts will be integrated into this unit of study
    2. Activities
    3. Demonstration to begin our learning activities.
      1. Pass out materials: (4 students per table)
        • Different colors of construction paper, 12x18 (1/student)
        • Pencil and eraser (1/student)
        • Scissors (1/student)
        • Markers, crayons, or colored pencils to add details (variety of colors)
        • Glue (2/table of 4)
        • Ruler (18 inch ruler works best) (1/student)
        • Tape (1/table of 4 students)
        • Index cards with lines on them, 3x5 (*in advance, pre-cut them to 3 inch square for each student) (1/student)
      2. Demonstrate as students follow along:
        • Discuss and show an example(s) (MC Escher print on-line and/or book of tessellations) of a translation tessellation. We will be creating the simplest type of tessellation called a translation. In creating the original shape that will be repeated again and again, the congruent shapes will fit together like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, never overlapping nor will there be gaps between them.
        • Begin video, “The Art and Magic of Tessellations”
        • With your 3 inch square index card in front of you, draw a curved line from the top left corner to the top right corner of the index card.
        • Next, draw a different curved line from the top left corner to the bottom left corner.
        • Carefully cut along the lines you drew.
        • Slide the top shape to the bottom of the card, making sure all of the lines are horizontal.
        • Tape the straight edge of the shape to the bottom edge of the card.
        • Slide the left side shape to the right side of the card. Make sure all of the lines are horizontal.
        • Tape the straight edge of the shape to the right edge of the card.
        • Put your name on this cutout shape as well as on the 12x18 piece of construction paper so you’re all ready for day 2.
      *Depending on how precise you want to be with your design you have the following options to choose from in regards to your construction paper: Have students draw a 3 inch grid onto the 12x18” construction paper (demonstrate as students follow along). This could take an entire class period to complete. Prior to class, have the 3” grid already drawn on 12x18” construction paper by sending it to the printer and have it copied to save you time. Do not draw the 3” grid, leaving the paper without lines. (This way is how I usually do it and it’s how the following directions will be stated since I work with over 100 students)

    Learning Activities

    Day 2 continue watching video
    1. Demonstrate how to trace the cutout shape onto the 12x18 construction paper by following these directions:
      • Place the cutout shape onto the top left of the 12x18” construction paper, matching the straight edges of the index card to the straight edge of the corner of the paper. Trace around the shape.
      • Slide the shape to the right until it fits like a jigsaw puzzle piece with the first shape you traced. Trace the shape again.
      • Repeat sliding and tracing until the entire paper is filled with the shape. (may need to finish on day 3)
      Day 3 and 4 continue watching video until finished
      • Continue sliding and tracing until the entire paper is filled with the shape.
      • Look at your design from every direction, trying to figure out what it looks like or resembles; start adding details with pencil first, then add markers, crayons or colored pencils.
      • Continue until design is completed.
    2. Explore
      • http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/7685/preview/ Navajo and math…..#50, an interactive site creating tessellation and symmetry.
      • http://www.shodor.org/interactivate/activities/Tessellate/ interactive site to create tessellations on computer.
      • Explore rotation (this tessellation has the congruent shape repeating around a central point)and reflection ( it’s just like a translation tessellation except what makes it different is that the original shape is repeated in a pattern that places some of the congruent shapes backwards on the page; as though the shape was looking in a mirror at itself.) tessellation designs.
    3. Discussion Topics

      1. Tessellations; the history and making of symmetrical designs. A tessellation is a special kind of design; some being simple while others are complex. They are made from different patterns of repeating shapes. The shapes that make up a tessellation are polygons (closed shapes having 3 or more sides). Triangle, squares and octagons are some examples. Polygons that are the exact same size are called congruent. Congruent polygons fit together like jigsaw puzzles, repeating over and over. There are never any gaps between the shapes and the shapes never overlap.
      2. Shapes of the world - cultures and their relationship.
        1. The word tessellation comes from the old Latin word “tessella” , meaning tile. Since an old language had a word for tessellations, we know they were created thousands of years ago. For many centuries, people have created tessellations around the world.
        2. Tessellations were first created in Mesopotamia (now known as Iraq) more than 6000 years ago. The original designs were made from pebbles set in plaster, simple designs used to decorate floors. Later on, the designs became more and more complex: often created with clay mosaic tiles. Tiles were painted with a design, and then attached in repeating patterns on walls, floors and ceilings.
      3. Early tessellation designs can be found in:
        1. Mosques (place of worship)
        2. Islamic art:
          • Focuses on the depiction of patterns and Arabic calligraphy, rather than on figures because its feared by many Muslims that the depiction of the human form is a sin and not allowed.
          • Is developed from many sources; Roman, early Christian, Byzantine .styles, central Asian and Chinese influences. Repeating elements such as the use of geometrical floral or vegetal designs in a repetition known as the arabesque-used to symbolize the transcendent, indivisible and infinite nature of Allah.
          • Islamic architecture is the most important expression of Islamic art. The role of the dome has been used in Islamic architecture for centuries. Domes today are incorporated into Western architecture.
          • Pile carpet has become well known, more commonly referred to as the Oriental carpet or rug. The carpet weaving is a rich and deeply embedded tradition in Islamic societies.
          • Pottery is prevalent in Islamic art, assuming the form of elaborate pottery.
        3. Castles (large buildings with thick walls to protect royal families and others who live in it)
        4. Alhambra, a 700 year old castle in Granada, Spain (almost every surface is covered some sort of tessellation) http://www.andalucia.com/cities/granada/alhamhistory.htm
        5. Navajo Indians used tessellations to create their geometric woven rugs.
        6. Thirteen colonies in the 1600’s-quilts covering their beds –quilts consisted of congruent shapes cut from small pieces of cloth which were from clothes too tattered to wear.
        7. Dutch artist, MC Escher made tessellation drawings and prints popular.
        8. Computer technology- using special software, artists are able to draw, fill with detail, and add color. Immediately artists can post them on the Internet for the world to see.

    Culminating Activity

    After creating the hands-on artwork assignment(s), students will:

    Visual Art
    • Display finished artwork within their school.
    • Share and reflect with peers.
    • Each student can verbalize about their artwork using academic terms (terms to be taught in a given course) (e.g. compostion the arrangement of parts in an artwork to create unity and symmetry the same on both sides)
    Social Studies
    • Identify the location/region of cultures studied or represented.
    • Explain how background and history influence people’s actions (e.g., farming methods, hunting methods, economic decisions)
    • Explain the contributions of various ethnic groups (e.g., Native Americans, immigrants) to the history of North Dakota (e.g., food, traditions, languages, celebrations
    Math
    • Use a variety of strategies to solve problems; drawing pictures to plan out finished artwork.
    • Describe the attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes. Identify, describe, and model (e.g., using straws or other materials) parallel, perpendicular, and intersecting lines and line segments
    • Identify regular polygons such as parallelograms, trapezoids, rectangles, squares and rhombus

    Cross-Curricular Activity


    Visual Art – Draw, compose a tessellation
    Social Studies – characteristics of significant features of different cultures.
    Math – Draw pictures to solve problems, describe 2D and 3D shapes.
    Language Arts – Write to understand and improve comprehension

    Community Connections

    Plains Art Museum: http://plainsart.org’exhibits/
    The Rourke Art Museum: http://www.therourke.org/
    Students in ND and northern MN can relate to many of the artworks found at both of these museums in Fargo, ND. The art exhibits change throughout the year, so I am providing these links that could be used to preview and select an art work that will complement the lessons. (Art works always need to be previewed for appropriateness before displaying them for students.)
    Visiting with ELL teachers in your school.
    Lutheran Social Services
    Charism program in Fargo Public Schools

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Recipes to Remember; a Family Recipe Memoir Book

    Written By: Melinda Crimmins
    Grade Level: High School Language Arts , Social Studies, adaptable to all ages.

    Time Allotment

    Unit, five to six 50 minute class periods

    Overview

    In this lesson, students select favorite family recipes, research the history of its ingredients, interview family members and write family memoirs, then compile the data in a family recipe and memoir book.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Family Recipe Book Requirements
    Graphic Organizer Traditions
    Food Quotes
    Family Tradition Essay
    Interview Questions
    Powerpoint

    Subject Matter

    Family, Culture, Tradition

    Learning Objectives

    • Students learn about history and culture by studying a particular food or recipe that is important to their family.
    • Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity.
    • Gain an understanding of the many roles that food plays in people's lives
    • Learn about different cultures and groups through food
    • Use a range of research and presentation skills

    Media Components - Video/Web

    The Meaning of Food | PBS
    http://www.pbs.org/opb/meaningoffood/

    Video Clip : Food Memories; Minnesota State Fair
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-We2XtOilc

    Video Clip: Behind the Recipe; Angel Food Pie
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FzfkenEPFUQ

    Video Clip: Behind the Recipe; Southern Macaroni Pie
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xWq_6poyCI&feature=channel&list=UL

    Food For The Ancestors - PBS: Public Broadcasting Service
    http://www.pbs.org/foodancestors/main.html

    Lesson Plan: Students Share Global Holiday Traditions
    http://www.pbs.org/…ns/world/july-dec11/holidays_12-20.pdf

    Materials

    • printer paper
    • Pictures of relatives
    • Family Recipes
    • Paper
    • Binding machine and ½ “ binding combs
    • Clear report covers
    • Scanner

    Introductory Activities

    1. Brainstorming/Webbing. Have students think of celebrations and holidays that have food associated with them. Write the celebrations as well as the food on the board in the form of a list or a web. Have them also name holidays from other cultures if they know of any, if not give them examples. (some ideas--Passover, Hanukkah, Rosh Hashanah, Chinese New Year, Hana Matsuri, Powwows, Cambodian New Year, TET, Birthdays, Cinco de Mayo, Christmas, Thanksgiving, Day of the Dead, Halloween, Easter, Valentines, Korean Children's Day, Kwanzaa, Ramadan, Mardi Gras, etc.)
    2. After discussing their responses, explain to students that there are many types of foods associated with different cultural and ethnic groups, traditions and celebrations that feature foods, and different rules about how and when people eat. Foods and food rituals help us learn about cultures and groups.
    3. Show students a clip from THE MEANING OF FOOD. You can choose from among many segments. For a complete listing, go to www.pbs.org/meaningoffood. Or show one of the Behind the Recipe clips.
    4. Ask students to think about their own family heritage. What recipes might their mothers, fathers, or other relatives be most famous for. Discuss how certain dishes are culinary signatures of a person, city, or country
    5. Ask students to complete the graphic organizer (See handout 1) describing their family celebrations and daily meals, what food is served, how it is eaten and with whom.
    6. In small groups or pairs, have students compare how similar and different their traditions are from each other and how this reflects the specific identity of their family and/or culture.
    7. Instruct students that they will each select their family’s favorite recipes, interview family members about the cultural and family traditions associated with the dish, research the recipe and its ingredients and create a family recipe memoir book.
    8. Hand out the student worksheet and ask students to interview family members at home or on the phone.
    9. After students have interviewed a family member and acquired a family recipe and photo follow the steps below to guide your students through the lesson plan. See handout 2: Family Recipe and Memoir
      1. research an ingredient in their recipe
      2. write a story to go along with their recipe and picture (If the photo is not in a digital format, students must scan the picture) If they are not able to obtain a family photograph have student find an image to go along with their recipe on the internet.

    Culminating Activity

    Have students choose a different recipe for each day that you continue this project.
    Have students compile the interviews, research, pictures and recipes in a book format with cover, index, and page numbers using a word processor, scanner and binding machine.
    See Handout 3: Family Recipe and Memoir Requirements
    Handout 4: Food Quotes

    Conclusion
    Students can be assessed on their recipe, memoir content, writing conventions, and design.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Family Tradition Essay ( See handout 5): Have students write an essay on their family traditions or a new family tradition they would like to implement.
    Mathematical Conversion: Have students convert (i.e. from serves 10 to serves 30) a traditional recipe from home that relates to a family celebration and bring to share with the class.
    Price Comparison: Ask your students to find the current price of the ingredients used in the recipe and compare with the price of the ingredients from
    20 years ago. Students may include the information in their recipe books or present it in a Microsoft Office Excel spreadsheet. Aroma Poem writing. Review the concept that smells are a very powerful agent that can bring back memories of an event or place. Bring in different spices for the students to smell (cinnamon, pine=Christmas; turkey=Thanksgiving; blown out candle=birthdays, chili powder=family camp out; etc.). Ask them if any of the smells bring back a memory of a family celebration or other type of celebration, or event. Have students write a poem about the memory that was evoked. (If nothing was prompted by the spices, have students try to come up with a smell that does remind them of something. For instance, would the smell of turkey or any other food trigger a memory.) Story Extension/Interview. Read Pgs 41-45, and 122-135 from When I Grew Up Long Ago by Alvin Shwartz as an introduction to this lesson.
    Read A Medieval Feast by Alki. Explain that food was an important social aspect of that time period and culture. Have students plan a celebration of differences. Have students research celebrations from their own heritage, create a poster, and give a presentation .
    Create A map and basic information of the country where your recipe gets its roots. Include at least five basic facts about the country.
    You may use these websites to do your country research:
    CountryWatch.com (http://aol.countrywatch.com/)
    Country @ a Glance (http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/infonation/index.asp)
    Encarta Encyclopedia (http://encarta.msn.com/artcenter_/browse.html)

    Community Connections

    Lesson Extensions

    Community Cultural Night: Expand this project into a school-wide celebration of the community's cultural groups and foods. Invite parents and extended family members to view the students' recipe/history books, to make and share the foods from their cultures and to talk about their own histories and food stories.

    Community Cultural Cookbook: Create a book reflecting the families and cultural groups represented at the school, and community including the ways in which foods are used in their culture, along with recipes. Distribute copies of the class cookbook online to all of the student’s families

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Story Behind Minnesota’s State Capitol and its Architect

    Written By: Ms. Nancy Jacobson
    Grade Level: Middle School, grades 6-8

    Time Allotment

    ten 50 min. class periods or two weeks

    Overview

    This lesson introduces the Minnesota State Capitol building’s history and its architect. Students will become acquainted with the architect, Cass Gilbert, his life and his work. The lesson includes student resources for researching the capitol and the architect, as well as the process of preparing a class presentation using the Web 2.0 presentation tool, Prezi. I chose Microsoft PowerPoint as my presentation tool so that I could incorporate TurningPoint 2008 software and use clickers to engage my students during my presentation. Requirements and a rubric for the students’ presentations are included. This lesson proved to be ideal in introducing students to their state capitol before a field trip and tour in May 2012. This presentation is available online with SlideRocket.com at http://portal.sliderocket.com/BTQTM/ConcordiaTI

    Another presentation tool that I have used with great success is VoiceThread.com. It has the options of using slides or videos and using narration as a unique way to present your project or lesson. Viewers have the opportunity to comment on each slide either with text or with a microphone.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Powerpoint

    Subject Matter

    MN History, English Language Arts, Information and Technology Literacy, Art History

    Learning Objectives

    The students will:
    • Understand the important role Cass Gilbert played in designing and building the American Skyline and the Minnesota State Capitol
    • Understand and appreciate the artistic thought process behind creating our built environment and recognize the extent to which daily life is affected by architectural design.
    • Locate, select and paraphrase the research text needed to complete the presentation.
    • To identify and sort images that will mesh with the text to create a multimedia presentation.
    • Apply their knowledge to create a PREZI presentation to share with their classmates.
    • Compare their investigations with the “real thing” when they tour the Minnesota Capitol on their field trip to the Minneapolis-St. Paul area.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Video: Cass Gilbert: Standing the Test of Time Entire Show Length: 28:21 min.
    URL: http://www.mnvideovault.org/mpml_player_embed.php?vid_id=18280&select_index=0
    Divided into 5 episodes 4-8 minutes in length
    1. His Potential (Length: 06:09) *This is the clip I used in my presentation.
    2. Architectural Promise Land (04:35)
    3. Defining Social Status (04:02)
    4. Business (05:15)
    5. His Lasting Legacy (08:20)
    There is no time shown while the video is running, so you have to decide when you think the episode ends and another begins.

    Video Clips from MN House of Representatives Public Information Services
    URL: http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/htv/archivesInfo.asp
    Titled: Inside the House Chamber 11 video clips running from 4-9 minutes
    (I had students listen to these clips by themselves with headphones and take notes.)

    Video: Who Built the Capitol? Minnesota State Capitol Labor History Tour (51:52)
    URL: http://vimeo.com/32570584
    A special tour created by researchers who assembled historical resources that focus on the laborers who built the Minnesota State Capitol. Funded by a MN Historical and Cultural Grant. There is some outstanding and interesting information in this “homemade” video. I have indicated on either the slide in the presentation or the note section of the slide where in the video to set the time.

    Video: Discover the Capitol (On the Links for Youth page of the Minnesota State Legislature Web site)
    URL: http://www.leg.state.mn.us/youth/index.aspx
    This is an excellent video and just the right length. I would have used it in my presentation but it downloaded in a rm. format that seemed impossible for me to figure out how to link it to a slide. They claim it uses RealPlayer but it doesn’t. I sent the Legislative librarian an email explaining my frustrations.

    Video: State Capitol Walking Tour
    URL: http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/msc/state_capitol_walkingTour.htm
    The Quadriga is #3 on the tour. Remember to enlarge the image for viewing, as well as hide the test and use the audio button. This tour would make an interesting extension to the lesson.

    Video Clip: Almanac – Did You Know? Fun facts about the MN State Capitol Building 1:45 min. in length MN Video Vault of tpt aired 11/16/2001
    URL: http://www.mnvideovault.org/index.php?id=841&select_index=5&popup=yes

    Video Clip: Almanac – Did You Know? Fun facts about the MN State Capitol Building 1:35 min. in length MN Video Vault of tpt aired 10/05/2001
    URL: http://www.mnvideovault.org/index.php?id=819&select_index=7&popup=yes

    Video Clip: Almanac - Saint Paul Capitol Design by Cass Gilbert aired 6/26/2009 MN Video Vault of tpt, Twin Cities Public Television 3:10 min. in length
    URL: http://www.mnvideovault.org/index.php?id=17817&select_index=6&popup=yes


    Web Sites Used & Useful

    Minnesota Historical Society STATE CAPITOL
    URL: http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/msc/
    History and Preservation http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/msc/history.html
    This site and the one below it proved to have very informative text for the students to read and take notes on. It was easier for me to run a copy of each text for my students. This way they could take it with them and work on reading and finding interesting factual information.

    Cass Gilbert Society’s Website Click on Biography, Works and Photos of Gilbert in the menu bar
    URL: http://www.cassgilbertsociety.org

    Self-guided Tour Brochure Minnesota Historical Society
    URL: http://www.mnhs.org/places/sites/msc/selfguided.pdf
    See directly above for comments. This also served as an example of a brochure. Using Microsoft Publisher to create a unique brochure is yet another method of the student showing you they understand.

    Minnesota State Legislature LINKS for YOUTH
    URL: http://www.leg.state.mn.us/youth/index.aspx
    This site has a wealth of information if one needs to teach MN government and/or how a bill becomes a law. Every site on the page is worth going to for information about our state and local government. It is well worth it to cover MN government before focusing on the Capitol, as they go hand in hand.

    BibMe Fast and Easy Bibliography Maker-MLA, APA, Chicago, or Turabian formats that can be downloaded and included in a document and/or presentation. It makes creating your bibliography very simple.
    URL: http://www.bibme.org/
    There is a free version online that is all you would need.

    TurningTechnologies.com (Clickers) http://www.turningtechnologies.com/
    If you are interested in trying out a set of clickers with your students, TurningTechnologies is an excellent company to work with.

    SlideRocket.com
    A Web 2.0 presentation tool that enables you to collaborate and to share it with others. More than one person can work on the presentation at one time across the Internet. This presentation is available to view and edit at the
    URL: http://app.sliderocket.com/app/sliderocket.aspx#sharePage
    SlideRocket’s Home page is https://login.sliderocket.com/

    Materials

    • Minnesota's Capitol: A Centennial Story (Hardcover) by Leigh Roethke, Tim Pawlenty this book is a non-electronic source of information and images for students. Is available to be checked out in most school and public libraries and can be purchased on Amazon.com for Used prices.
    • Turning Technologies software and clickers if you want the students to be interacting throughout the presentation.
    • Access to computer and projector to show the initial presentation
    • Computer lab or laptop cart so that students each have their own work station
    • Method for students to take notes, either using paper & pencil or an electronic way of keeping their notes
    • Either a Hot List of potential web sites for the students to use or links in a document that is filed in a folder accessible to all. Do this for images in the same fashion. It will save students the time spent searching for images for their presentation. Most of them will do some searching anyway.
    • Storyboards for individual students to plan out their presentation. Their storyboard must be complete before beginning any project on the computer.
    • Copy of the rubric for each student showing him/her how they will be graded on their project.
    • Copy of the basic requirements for the project should be in the hands of each student.
    • Headphones available for each student to listen to the videos. They may not use video in their presentation, but there is much information that can be paraphrased and taken notes on as they watch and listen to the videos.
    • Ideal but not absolutely necessary in the computer lab is some form of simple, reliable Classroom Management software such as LanSchool. Enhances learning in a computer lab by replicating the teacher's monitor to all computer monitors as well as allow a teacher to control a student’s computer or limit which web pages students are able to get on to.
    • If there is a student that is being reprimanded and cannot access the Internet, encyclopedias and/or other written text would be useful to them.

    Teacher Preparation

    Teachers will need to find time to preview the videos listed under Media Components. It would be helpful to read the hard cover book, Minnesota's Capitol: A Centennial Story to obtain a good understanding of the history behind MN’s Capitol. Run off copies of requirements for project, rubric & storyboard for each student. If you think it is worth it and/or have students that have no access to the Internet at home, run copies of MN Historical Society History of the Capitol and the Tour the Capitol brochure. If planning on using the PowerPoint presentation included with the lesson, run through it as many times as you need to in order to feel comfortable. You may edit it in any way you see fit. If you do not have TurningPoint Technologies to use clickers, have students write their answers on paper and tally up the results, figure out the percentages of each answer and make graphs for each of the ten questions.

    If you are in a teaching situation where you can team with a social studies teacher, it works very well to simultaneously have her/him teaching and engaging the same students in activities to become familiar with Minnesota government and who meets where in the Capitol building. The entire experience becomes more real to them.

    Introductory Activities

    Connecting to Students’ Experiences: Architecture in Your World
    1. The critical decisions faced by architects in the design process are easily viewed b students when asked about the construction of the environments with which they are already familiar.
    2. Ask students to look at the room they are sitting in. Give students a few minutes to play detective by dissecting their environment.
    3. Consider: What materials is the building made from?
    4. What colors are most noticeable in your surroundings?
    5. How do those colors make you feel?
    6. How does the arrangement of the room (furniture, carpets, wall coverings, colors) influence how people use this room?
    7. How are the sources of light and temperature controlled?
    8. Give students another few minutes to think about the design of another room in the school, perhaps the art or music room or cafeteria.
    9. In what ways are they alike and different?
    10. How does the design of the room influence the way it is used and how people interact within those walls?
    Materials No props needed.
    Personally I like to sit on a stability ball or chair and have the students sit either on the floor or on their balls in a horseshoe fashion when we are having an “intimate” discussion.

    Learning Activities

    Develop a Shared Vocabulary

    Key Words may include: architect, architecture, symmetry, keystone, arch, masonry, spire, dome and column.

    1. The words can be typed on a word document and projected up on the screen.
    2. Invite students to come back to your computer and type in the meanings of the vocabulary words as they are discussed in class.
    3. If the class is stumped on a word’s meaning, invite them to discover it on their own by using the Internet’s Dictionary.com or by using the hard covered dictionaries on the bookcase.
    4. Save the document and it can be copied for anyone that may need it.


      View the Presentation, The Story Behind Minnesota’s Capitol and its Architect.
    1. Before beginning ask the students if they have ever experienced touring a new place. Do you think it makes a difference in the whole touring experience if you know a little something about the place beforehand?
    2. More than likely they will tell you that it certainly does make a difference.
    3. In an excited manner, share with them that that is exactly what their next project in TECH is all about – their tour of the Minnesota Capitol building when they go to the Twin Cities on their Class Trip!
    4. Alert them to the fact that they won’t just be learning about the Capitol, but also its architect, Cass Gilbert.
    5. Direct their focus to the task of using clickers during the course of the presentation to determine how well they are paying attention. Let them know that their points will be totaled at the end.
    6. Mention that they need not take notes, as they will have that opportunity when they begin their research.
    7. Turn off just enough of the lights in the room to have a crisp, clear picture on the screen. Also check to make sure that the volume is just right.
    8. Invite any students whose vision of the screen may be partially blocked to move to a spot where they can see well.
    9. Even though there are 10 questions built into the presentation using TurningTechnologies clickers, pause to clarify information and/or images during the presentation.
    10. If time allows, mention to the class that before they leave TECH class they will be asked to share one fact that they learned about their state capitol building or about Cass Gilbert.
    11. Pass out the clickers, making sure the students receive the numbered clicker that has been assigned to them.
    12. Show the presentation stopping momentarily to check for understanding with the clickers and questions embedded in the presentation.


    Materials
    Computer connected to a projector with a white surface to project upon.

    Word document with the vocabulary words typed on it leaving room for the definitions of each word

    A clicker for each student.

    Culminating Activity

    1. The last slide of the presentation introduces the culminating activity, which is project – based. Each student will research the MN State Capitol building and find facts and information that they find interesting to share with others.
    2. In conjunction, they will also learn more about Cass Gilbert, the architect.
    3. A folder holding images that will be useful for their creations will be located in the Student Z Drive under the name, Capitol.
    4. There will be a Word document titled MN Capitol HOTLIST that will have direct links to web sites to visit when doing research. Encourage them to listen and watch the short video clips to find information.
    5. Give students the choice of taking notes while researching electronically or handwritten. Remind them not to copy, as that is plagiarism.
    6. Remind students to keep a list of the sites they use to take information from, so they will have the necessary information to create a bibliography to give credit to the sources from which they found their facts.
    7. Allow 4-5 class periods for students to accumulate their notes.
    8. During this entire process the teacher should be stopping at students’ work stations to monitor their progress.
    9. When you have okayed their note taking, they are ready to begin to search for images or short video clips that will complement their written information. All media should be put into a new folder titled, Capitol_Gilbert in their personal folder, which makes it easily accessible.
    10. Allow two class periods for completing this step.
    Using PREZI, students will create their presentation.
    1. Begin the next class period with introducing them to Prezi.com and creating their own account.
    2. For this they will need their Gaggle Email account username and password.
    3. Once everyone is done with completing this task, I will take over their computers using the management software, LanSchool. During this time I will have complete control over their computer while they watch the brief tutorial on creating a Prezi.
    4. After watching the tutorial and some demonstration on the white board, students should be able to begin putting their Prezi together.
    5. I have found from past experience that students are quite good at helping each other out when perplexed.
    6. Allow at least 3-4 class periods for this creative task.
    7. When the student says, “I’m done,” tell him/her to go through their Requirements sheet and their rubric to double check that they have included everything.
    8. Again it is important that this Prezi be saved in the folder earmarked for them if it can be downloaded. It will take some cleverness for the students to save their Prezi online in their own Prezi account.
    9. Students will be encouraged to share their Prezi presentations with their classmates.
    Materials
    Headphones
    Method of taking notes
    Personal folders on the Student Z drive
    A Flashdrive

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    As I mentioned in my overview of this lesson, it works out very well for the students to be learning about government and the three branches of our government while working on this project in TECH. Their Prezi can be viewed in their social studies class.

    STUDENT MATERIALS NEEDED:
    Flashdrive to save their docs on to.
    Personal folders set up by the instructor on the Student Hard Drive
    An organized method of note taking
    A folder labeled Capitol_Gilbert filled with the images and media the student plans to use in their Prezi presentation.
    User name and password for their Gaggle email account
    An account on Prezi.com and on BibMe.com

    Community Connections

    1. I will contact the local newspaper to see if they would do a story on the students getting to know more about their state capitol and its architect.
    2. Students will be encouraged to share their Prezi with their parents, grandparents and others.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Energy IS Our Business

    Written By: Julie Costello
    Grade Level: 6-8, but remember that all lessons may be adapted to any level

    Time Allotment

    2-5 class periods

    Overview

    Prior knowledge about carbon footprints and individual measures to reduce carbon into the atmosphere would be important before having students learn about carbon capture in this lesson. I would suggest Carbon Footprints! worksheet, Carbon Footprints! PowerPoint and activities that go with that which can be found in the grade 10 section at: http://www.prairiepublic.org/education/teachers/media-resources/eerc-2011-lesson-plans

    Students will work together to learn about carbon capture and storage. The premise is that the team has been chosen to present information for a public campaign educating people about the dangers of too much carbon in the atmosphere and what can be done to get rid of some of that carbon.

    Students will jigsaw information and prepare a presentation together, each person presenting their part

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Rubric
    Letter
    Project Organization
    Carbon Capture

    Subject Matter

    Supports Common Core
    Reading: summarization and presentation
    Science: carbon in the atmosphere and carbon storage

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to . . .
    • show understanding of reading when writing a summary of an informational text
    • understand meaning of difficult words as used in context
    • understand how a section of text fits with the overall structure and meaning of the text
    • determine point of view when reading

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Managing Carbon Dioxide: http://www.ndstudies.org/media/geologic_solution_carbon_capture_and_storage

    Materials

    Letter of Congratulations, Rubric and Paragraphs
    White paper (large construction) for posters

    Teacher Preparation

    Preview video clip
    http://www.ndstudies.org/media/geologic_solution_carbon_capture_and_storage and note where you will want to stop for discussion

    Have copies prepared and paper, markers, scissors

    Introductory Activities

    Students have been studying about climate change. Is excess carbon in the atmosphere adding to this problem? Students have examined what they can do on a personal level. (See note under Overview). Now we are looking at a larger scene to make a change. Can carbon capture help slow climate change?

    • Teacher hands out materials and explains task • Students work in groups to plan presentation, with students working on individual tasks, reading paragraphs and preparing presentation 1. The hook: Teacher creates excitement about the upcoming presentations of teams with one being selected to head the public campaign introducing carbon storage.
    1. teacher may pre-select groups of 5
    2. teacher may randomly have students number into groups
    3. students may select groups

    Learning Activities

    Teacher hands out materials and explains task
    Students work in groups to plan presentation, with students working on individual tasks, reading paragraphs and preparing presentation

    Culminating Activity

    Students present to the group
    Teacher may decide to have group discussion about who would “win” the competition (what made for a good presentation, what would you do differently next time)
    Teacher may invite outside experts in to decide who would be chosen to head campaign

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • Students could use the information they gain to write persuasive article
    • Teacher could extend into paragraphs 9 – 13 or offer summarization as extra or extend credit

    Community Connections

    Interview an adult about feelings of carbon storage
    Bring in panel of experts on carbon storage and have students give questions
    Have experts that students can e-mail questions as they work through process

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Where's Your Energy?

    Written By: Mindy Johnson
    Grade Level: 9-10

    Time Allotment

    Approximately three class periods

    Overview

    Students will research and create a brochure on one energy source and identify features of it such as: advantages and disadvantages, locations of nearest source, how energy is created in the process, and other points of interest. Additionally, we will investigate ways that these energy resources have had a major impact on regions within our own state.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Project Rubric
    Energy Sources Project

    Subject Matter

    Physical Science

    Learning Objectives

    Students will learn in greater detail about one energy source, publish findings in a brochure and analyze the impact that resources make on the regions they are part of.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Energy Sources
    http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/content/phy03.sci.phys.energy.energysource/

    Faces of the Oil Patch
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/prairie-public-on-demand/faces-of-the-oil-patch

    Materials

    MATERIALS:
    Project information sheet and rubric
    Computer lab/cart
    Computer with projector, internet access

    Teacher Preparation

    Copy of sources available for students to sign up for
    Copies of project information and rubric
    Reserve computer lab/cart

    Introductory Activities

    INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITY - SETTING THE STAGE: Preface: This project is used as a concluding project in which students have already identified the components of what makes an energy source renewable or non-renewable, some examples of each, and what we as consumers use that energy for.
    1. Student will watch the Energy Sources video to become familiar with the main features/components of each of the energy resources they will choose from for their project. The video ends by asking the audience, “What’s your choice?”
    2. Students are then given the list of possible resources to choose from.
    Materials:
    1. PBS resource listed above (http://www.pbslearningmedia.org/content/phy03.sci.phys.energy.energysource/)
    2. Energy Sources List of choices for students to choose from

    Learning Activities

    1. Once students have selected their energy resource for this project, go over the project details.
    2. Introduce Microsoft Publisher. Begin a demo of some basic features of it.
    3. With computer access, allow students to conduct their research.
      • Students should be answering questions on the project information sheet as they go. Remember to have them print out sources used directly from that source and highlight information they will be putting on their brochure.
    4. Have students create their brochure. Remind students of extra credit options as they are wrapping projects up. Projects should not be due the same day.
    5. Allow students to review each other’s’ brochures once all have been completed.


    Materials:
    Project information sheet and rubric
    Computers with printer access

    Culminating Activity

    1. Watch PBS’ Faces of the Oil Patch
    2. Create SharePoint discussion board for students
      • Reflect on what aspect was most surprising or made the biggest impact.
      • Compare that region to ours; what would happen if it was here?


    Materials:
    Computer with projector and internet access
    PBS Resource listed above (http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/prairie-public-on-demand/faces-of-the-oil-patch)
    Computer lab/cart

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Social Studies: Considering the regions that are “rich” in each of the sources researched, examine how their resource has changed the culture of its people and how the physical features of those places have helped (or hindered) access to the resource.
    Language Arts: Write a persuasive essay featuring an energy source of the student’s choosing.

    Community Connections

    Invite speakers from various energy sectors to visit physical classroom or Skype
    Visit a site that garnishes energy (wind farm, etc.), location dependent
    Create posters featuring renewable energy sources and display in public venues, as permissible

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Packrats with a Purpose

    Written By: Susan Geihl
    Grade Level: Higher Elementary / MIddle School

    Time Allotment

    Five days

    Overview

    Students will be introduced to two men whose dreams resulted in Moorhead Museums. They will learn the purpose of museums. They will learn about the following careers in art: architects, interior designers, and graphic designers. Students will personalize this information to create their own museum and logo.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Museum Slide Show
    Artist Statement
    Make My Museum
    Museum Logo Worksheet

    Subject Matter

    Visual arts, with interdisciplinary connections with Minnesota history, language arts, and math.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will learn:
    • the purpose of museums
    • architects design museums
    • interior designers plan the inside of buildings
    • graphic designers create logos
    • how to use tools to make precise drawings to show depth by using foreground and background
    • printmaking allows them to make multiple images
    • to present their work using an artist’s statement
    • to write positive feedback about other’s art
    Students will use their interests to plan their own museum.
    They will become:
    • Architects and design the facade of their museum
    • Interior designers and draw their collections inside.
    • City planners by placing their museum in a location
    • Graphic designers by creating their museum’s logo.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Websites
    http://www.youtube.com/user/PrairiePublicBcast/videos?view=0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5s6HD3jciQ&feature=related
    41 seconds...quick photos of the Rourke Museum with snappy music

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kj9nK0YLyIo&feature=relmfu
    (6:07 minutes) Prairie Mosaic 103 (Patchwork of stories about people and places that contribute to the art culture and history of our region) (00:48-6:55) Rourke Art Museum

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Px8FfNteu34
    (4:01 minutes) Brad Bachmeier and Tim Ray talk about James O’Rourke and his influences on the arts and artist from the region (many of the same footage as the Prairie Mosaic 103) 00:0-1:50 Brad talking about his work and Jim’s influence on his career 01:53-2:19 Jim talking 2:20-3:47 Tim talking about his work and Jim’s influences on the career of artists

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XySVQ0ZeiN0 Prairie Pulse 807
    22:07-26:46 Same footage as Previous web site with an introduction

    http://www.therourke.org/
    The Rourke Museum / Gallery House website
    Images of what is currently on display at the Museum and the Gallery Information such as addresses, hours, and admission prices
    GALLERY HOUSE- History and images of exhibits as well as past exhibits
    MUSEUM- Description of permanent collection present and past exhibits
    ABOUT US- Information about museums and James O’Rourke

    https://www.facebook.com/RourkeArts

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moorhead,_Minnesota
    Rourke Art Museum and Gallery House are listed under Arts and Culture

    http://www.inforum.com/event/article/id/310837/
    INFORUM article on James O’Rourke’s death (biography)

    http://www.startribune.com/entertainment/blogs/117546228.html
    Star Tribune article on James O’Rourke’s death (photo)

    http://hpr1.com/opinion/article/james_tiernan_orourke_a_tribute
    High Plains Reader’s tribute to James O’Rourke (words by colleagues and friends about James O’Rourke)

    http://www.wday.com/event/article/id/62142/
    WDAY news report on the Estate Sale of James O’Rourke James O’Rourke’s house

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O0skLwaFpn0
    (00.00-0:35) Simple explanation of relief printmaking(can be used with logo lesson)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StrQ1vEENms
    Amazing explanation of the Hjemkomst 00:00 2:20

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tm8QoF8N8gM
    quick view of Hjemkomst

    http://vimeo.com/24530092
    photo of the human mosaic made by students at Robert Asp Elementary

    http://video.pioneer.org/video/1807519576/
    Post Cards.....half hour of information about Robert Asp

    Materials

    Day 1
    paper and pencil for student to jot down ideas

    Day 2
    pencils, eraser, rulers, compass, protractor, copy paper to practice using the tools, drawing paper 6” x 9” – one per student

    Day 3
    pencils, erasers, rulers, protractor, compass, scissors, 9 x 12 inch paper (light grey or white) scissors- one per student

    Day 4
    Sketch handout for the logo design, pencils, erasers, tracing paper 2 x 2 inches,
    styrofoam 2 x2 inches, pen or stylist –one per student
    Baskets of water soluable markers to share- 1 per table
    Extras: stationery, envelopes, card stock 2 x 3 inches for business cards, paper bags, other items that maight have a business logo printed on them.

    Day 5
    printing materials from previous day, pencils. Handout for artists’ statement.

    Teacher Preparation

    Day 1
    View the videos and slide show about the purposes of museums Make copies of the “Make My Museum” sheet - one per student

    Day 2
    Watch the video clips of:
    • The Hjemkomst showing that the building was design for what is inside.
    • The Rourke Museum explaining that an existing building was used for the museum.
    • Make a slide show of “unusual” buildings that relate to what is inside of them.
    • Practice using the ruler, protractor, and compass and made an example to check for possible problems


    Day 3
    Find examples of museums around the world with varied backgrounds. Find interior views with a variety of ways to display items to keep them safe.

    Day 4
    Images of popular logos without words. Also, if you have iPads, there is an AP for a logo identification game. Images of the Rourke Museum logo and the Hjemkomst Center logo.

    Day 5
    Make copies of the artists’ statement

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    A keynote is provided, but feel free to adapt it to what your want to say.
    1. (Slides1/2)Start out by asking students the following question: “What do the following have in common?"
      Bison, ships, wedding dresses, African masks?
      They can all be found in Moorhead museums.
    2. (Slides4/5)Explain that each of these museums exist due to the dreams of twomen.
    3. (Slides 8/9)Video clips on James O’Rourke and Robert Asp
    Day 2
    Review that last time you talked about two museums in Moorhead, The Rourke and The Hjemkomst Center.
    Ask students“Who makes the designs for buildings?”Explain that another wordfor buildings is Architecture and the name for the designer is Architect. (Way to remember is people are smaller than buildings and architect is smaller than architecture.

    Day 3
    Show images of the Rourke Museum and Hjemkomst Center and ask students what is surrounding the buildings. Explain that their museums do not need to be in Moorhead and take them on a world tour of museums.

    Day 4
    (Slide 29) Show students examples of familiar logos and ask them what they represent. Ask how they know that when some have no words? If you have time, play the logo game with the students.

    Day 5
    Today is what architects, interior designers, and graphic designers call “The presentation.” You have completed your work and now it is time to show it off. In the real world, you would be presenting to your client, the person who hired you, but today, your client will be your fellow students.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. (Slide10)Ask why we have museums. Le tstudents work withanother to jot down reasons
    2. Have students share ideas and keep a tally of them using the document camera or a large piece of paper. Circle the top three.
    3. (Slide11)Number one reason for museums is to “collect”
    4. (Slides12/13)Collect:Use the video clips to show collections at the Rourke Museum- ask students what was in the collection
    5. (Slide 14) Number 2 reason for museums is to “Protect” Talk about how they built a building for the Viking Ship. Ask what would have happened if they displayed it outside.
    6. (Slide15)Use the video clip to show the reference to protecting the PBS puppets. Challenge students to look when they visit museums, “Do they large windows in the galleries?”
    7. (Slides16/17/18)Number3reasonformuseums:“Share”Use the video on the traveling exhibits at each museum-ask students if they have ever been to an exhibit and what do they remember about it.
    8. Recap why we have museums and stress Rourke’s love of art and Asp’s love of his heritage which resulted in the building of a Viking ship.
    9. (Slide19)Ask students,“If you could build your own museum what would it be?What would be in your collection? What do you love? How would you protect it? And how would you share it with others?
    10. Hand out the planning worksheet and have students complete it during class.


    Day 2
    1. Architects are professionals who design buildings.To become an architect you need to have a Masters Degrees in Architecture.
    2. Ask students “How do you think that they got that Viking Ship in the building?”
    3. (Slide21)Let’s check it out.
    4. Explain that the building was new and designed to accommodate what was going to be inside it.So some museums are designed for that purpose.
    5. (Slide22)Some museums are not new buildings but are redesigned by architects so that the building will work for it’s new purpose Show video clip on James O’Rourke talking about The Rourke Museum
    6. Architects must be very exact in their drawings so that when the building is constructed it will be safe. Architects use tools to make precise drawings. Rulers, protractors, and compasses are also used in geometry.
    7. Students will follow along with the demonstration on how to use a ruler to make straight horizontal, vertical, and diagonal lines.
    8. Students will make curved lines with the protractor.
    9. Students will make a variety of circles with the compass.
    10. Hand out the final 6 x 9 inch paper
    11. Students write their name small and neatly on the bottom right edge and turn the paper over
    12. Students take the ruler and line it up on the right 6 inch edge, draw a straight line
    13. Repeat the same line on the left 6 inch edge
    14. Explain that students will not draw in these two outer spaces.
    15. Remind them that they are designing their own museum, so they should use lines and shapes that they like. Remind them to refer to their sketch on the back of their planning paper. Their building façade can be symmetrical or not. It should have the main entrance. They are only concerned with the building and not signs, banners, and the name of their museum. Just the doors, windows, roof, and walls of the front of the building.
    16. Students use pencil to design the façade of their museum


    Day 3
    1. Hand back museum drawings. Have students who were absent sit together so you can teach the previous lesson. Give students time to finish or make changes.
    2. Students should cut along the outline of their facade. Make sure they do not cut off the edges.
    3. Hand out the 9 x 12 paper and explain they must use a vertical format so that their surroundings can be seen when placed behind their façade.
    4. Students use pencils to draw the environment surrounding their museum.
    5. When they have their surround environment done, students should draw their collections on the back of their museum facade to show implying the interior of the building, their collections and how they will protect them.


    Day 4
    1. Explain that these logos are better than words because there is no language barrier. Artists who create logos are called graphic designers.
    2. (Slides 30\31) Today they will create their own logo for their museum. Show The Rourke and Hjemkomst Center logo. Explain that one represents the two brothers who started the Rourke and the Hjemkomst logo is a simplified drawing of the distinctive outline of the museum. Other ideas may be what is in the collection, where it is located, the name of the museum, or simply an interesting design.
    3. Pass out the logo sketch sheet. Have students fill in their name and draw at least three ideas for their logo. Their sketch must fit in the square.
    4. Students choose their favorite and place the tracing paper on top of it. They should be able to see the image and trace the lines.
    5. Students turn the tracing paper over so the image is face down and set it on top of the Styrofoam and press down on the lines with their pen or stylist.
    6. Students remove the tracing paper and retrace the lines with the pen or stylist so that they are deeper. They may cut around their logo design if they want. This technique is called relief printmaking and they must make the printing plate (styrofoam) the mirror image of their design. Hence the use of tracing paper and the ability to flip it over and see the design backwards.
    7. Students may tape a bottle cap on the back of their printing plate with double stick tape.
    8. Using water soluable (not permanent) markers, students color their printing plate. When they have finished coloring, they “breathe” on their printing plate and then press it on the back of the sketch handout. This is an artist’s proof and they can still make changes by pressing deeper or adding more lines.
    9. Students can print their logo on business cards, stationery, envelopes, or bags. They can also use stamp pads for a one color print.


    Day 5
    1. You will need to complete an artists’ statement because you will not be able to stay with your work to explain it to people. Therefore, your writing will do that for you.
    2. Review the handout and ask if there are any questions. Remind them that people are going to be reading this, so they should use good handwriting, complete sentences, and check for spelling.
    3. Students are given time to complete their art and artist’s statement.
    4. The last fifteen minutes of class have students set up their architecture, their logos, and artists’ statement.

    Culminating Activity

    Day 1
    Ask students to think about what their museum would look like. Explain that the next time you meet, you will teach them how to use tools to draw precisely like an architect does when designing a building

    Day 2
    Ask students to quickly show their drawing to their neighbor and talk about why they drew the lines and shapes they did in their building. Explain that this exercise helps them to think about their art and the choices they make. Remind them that building have to be somewhere and next time they will be drawing the surrounding area. How will they draw the skyline of a city? How will they draw a more natural setting? Also have them think about their collections.

    Day 3
    Students place their museum in the environment. Ask them about the name of their museum and how will they “share” so people know what their building is.

    Day 4
    Have students talk about their logo with a neighbor and explain how it relates to their museum. Tell the students that they will be presenting their architecture (museum) in its environment as well as their graphic design (logo) to the class tomorrow.

    Day 5
    “Artist walk about” Students place their art and statement out for others to see and then walk around and look at each others’ work. They are invited to make “positive-constructive” comments on the lower area of the artist’s statement handout. Remind them hurtful comments have no purpose.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Math in using the geometry tools. History in the Norwegian immigrants. Art history is the art collections of the Rourke as well as the building itself. Geography in choosing the location of their museum.

    Community Connections

    Museums and well known citizens of Moorhead. When teaching this lesson, you could personalize it by using architecture and people from your own location.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Face of the Oil Patch

    Written By: Julie Costello
    Grade Level: 6-8

    Time Allotment

    Two 45 minute class periods.

    Overview

    This lesson is used to introduce writing in the Social Studies classroom. Writing to respond to video will be used as an introduction for writing to respond to reading. Teacher will use gradual release of responsibility model to lead students toward independence. Students will construct a flipbook as they practice summarization.

    Supplemental Material
    Download the Lesson Plan
    All Titles and People Interviewed
    Cover of a Flipbook
    Example of Word Processed
    Download Powerpoint
    Notetaking Sheet
    Oil Patch Cube - Extra
    Table of Picture and Text
    Video Link

    Subject Matter

    Subject areas addressed include writing, summarization, responding to video, paragraph writing, ND Studies, geography, Human-Environment interaction

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to explain in writing how a changing environment impacts the people in North Dakota.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    http://ndstudies.org/search/results/search&keywords=oil%20patch/
    Listing of 28 people giving their views on how North Dakota oil has brought changes.

    http://www.registereastconn.org/sblceastconn/foldables/LayeredLookBook.pdf
    Directions for making foldable (I used only three sheets for this activity)

    Materials

    • computer
    • paper
    • scissors
    • glue sticks
    • stapler

    Teacher Preparation

    • Bookmark websites that you will use for instruction or modify attached power point.
    • Gather supplies
    • Prepare sample

    Introductory Activities

    Note: Students will have been introduced to the R,D,F paragraph writing format. In this format, students state the prompt in the first sentence. The second sentence is a Reason, Detail or Fact that supports the prompt. The third sentence is E: expand, example, extend. Students usually write 2 RDFs for a paragraph and then conclude. Introduction sentence + RDF + E + RDF + E + Conclusion would result in a six-sentence paragraph.

    Response to change:
    Board Work: Think of a time in your life when you had to deal with a change.

    When is a time that something changed in your life, perhaps moved, parents’ divorce, someone you knew died, etc. How did you respond? What if today you went home and found out you won the lottery – how would your life change? Talk with your partner.

    We each respond to change differently. Today we have lots of changes that we deal with, some we can control and some we can’t.

    We have some changes going on in our state. People react to change differently. We are going to listen to some of the voices from the oil patch and get to know some of the faces. As we listen, we are going to summarize how the person feels about changes that are happening in North Dakota and details to support our findings.

    Learning Activities

    The teacher introduces the first “face” – Mylo Wisness as a rancher. In the gradual release of responsibility, the teacher models first and shares with students what is going on in the thinking process. The teacher leads the students towards the summary of Mr. Wisness.

    The next part is the flip book. The teacher leads students toward the construction of the flip book. The teacher may choose to have students word process, include pictures, or hand write their summaries.

    Culminating Activity

    After the teacher has modeled, the next step is to work as a class with the teacher to complete a second summary. The third step is for students to work in partners to complete a summary, and the final step is for a student to independently complete a summary.

    Follow-up of a group discussion about how people have been affected by oil in North Dakota with students giving details to support what they think about the topic.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    In Language Arts, students could write a persuasive paper dealing with ND oil and its impact. Students could take on the role of newspaper reporter and write about how oil is impacting ND.

    The foldable is transferable to a variety of subjects. Students may summarize planets in Science, people in Social Studies and parts of a story in Language Arts. Students could also use steps for solving an equation in math.

    Community Connections

    Your students could make suggestions as to actions they could take on topics they generate concerning the impact of oil on the state.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: A Climate Friendly Future Unit and the Stabilization Wedges Game

    Written By: Melinda Crimmins
    Grade Level: High School

    Time Allotment

    One 40-50 minute class period is needed for the introductory license plate activity and discussion and the Wedges Powerpoint Presentation . The next day as an over view show the video Co2 and the Grenhouse Effect (www.undeerc.org)and (7 ways to Reduce Carbon). CMI (Carbon Mitigation Initiative) suggests using 2-3 standard (40-50 minute) class periods to prepare for and play the Stabilization Wedges game. In the first period, the Stabilization Triangle and the concept of wedges are discussed and the technologies introduced. Students can further research the technologies as homework. In the second period, students play the game and present their results. Depending on the number of groups in the class, an additional period may be needed for the presentation of results. Assessment and application questions are included and may be assigned as homework after the game has been played, or discussed as a group as part of an additional class period/assignment.

    Overview

    Students will be introduced to an overview of the carbon and climate situation. They will complete an introductory license plate activity, read article, collaborate with peer, research a variety of carbon cutting strategies, culminating in the playing of the Princeton University developed Stabilization Wedges Game.

    Supplemental Materials
    Downloadable Lesson Plan
    Write A Story
    Write A Text
    Write A Essay


    Stabilization Game
    Gameboard
    Wedges
    Teachers Guide
    Wedges_Figures_1_and_2

    Subject Matter

    Carbon and Climate Problem & Solutions, Language Arts, Social Studies, Science

    Learning Objectives

    The core purpose of this game is to convey the scale of effort needed to address the carbon and climate situation and the necessity of developing a portfolio of options. By the end of the exercise, students should understand the magnitude of human-sourced carbon emissions and feel comfortable comparing the effectiveness, benefits, and drawbacks of a variety of carbon- cutting strategies. The students should appreciate that there is no easy or “right” solution to the carbon and climate problem.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    License plate activity http://www.acme.com/licensemaker

    Videos Clip: Co2 and the Greenhouse Effect
    http://www.undeerc.org
    • Youtube: 7 ways to reduce carbon http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wcDHZ7Z-hQ
    • Introduction to the Wedges (Flash) • Wedges Presentation and Game, AAAS Annual Meeting 2007
    More stabilization wedge resources, including background articles and slides, are available at http://cmi.princeton.edu/wedges

    Materials

    Stabilization Wedges Articles & Videos
    Please note that the original "wedges" article published in 2004 showed seven (7) wedges in the stabilization triangle, but that, as emissions have continued to increase, the number of wedges needed to stabilize emissions has been raised to eight (8) in newer publications and graphics.
    Articles(links in downloadable Lesson Plan in Overview Section)
    • Climate Game Gives Real Options to Save World, NPR, 2007
    • Stabilization Wedges: Solving the Climate Problem for the Next 50 Years with Current Technologies
    S. Pacala and R. Socolow, Science, 2004.
    • Solving the Climate Problem: Technologies for Curbing CO2 emissions (PDF)
    R. Socolow, R. Hotinski, J. Greenblatt, S. Pacala, Environment, 2004.
    • Can We Bury Global Warming? (PDF)
    R. Socolow, Scientific American, 2005.
    • A Plan to Keep Carbon in Check (PDF)
    R. Socolow and S. Pacala, Scientific American, 2006.
    Materials (see Student Game Materials at end of downloadable lesson plan)
    • 1 copy of Instructions and Wedge Table per student (print single-sided to allow use of gameboard pieces!)
    • 1 Wedge Worksheet and 1 Gameboard with multi-colored wedge pieces per group, plus scissors for cutting out game pieces and glue sticks or tape to secure pieces to gameboard • Optional - overhead transparencies, posters, or other materials for group presentations

    Teacher Preparation

    Make copies of blank License template. Make Wedge Game Pieces. Make copies of Wedge Worksheet.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Distribute license templates. Instruct students to design a personalized license plate. Have student use a combination of seven numbers and/or letters in the center of the plate. Have student create a motto about an important place on the bottom of their plate. Instruct students to create a picture or symbol about something they consider important about activities they participate in their community. Have students choose a month in one corner and two numbers of importance to them in the other corner. Have audience make a license place by:
      Distributing TEMPLATES Have them fill in their template with:
      AN IMPORTANT PLACE AT THE TOP
      SEVEN NUMBERS OR LETTERS IN THE MIDDLE
      A SIGNIFICANT OR FAVORITE MONTH IN ONE CORNER
      IMPORTANT TWO NUMBERS IN ANOTHER CORNER
      A MOTTO ON THE BOTTOM ABOUT A FAVORITE ACTIVITY
      A SIGNIFICANT SYMBOL IN THE MIDDLE
      Distribute markers/ colored pencils. Allow time to finish. Then go around and tell why you picked those Why are they important. Are any linked to family traditions centered on nature, seasons, and climate? You choose the items you did because of your unique culture, family and places Would any of these significant items change if the climate changes? How would you feel if your children and grandchildren do not have that same connection or opportunities because of our changing climate. Show the Wedges Powerpoint Presentation.
      • Motivation. Review the urgency of the carbon and climate problem and potential ways it may impact the students’ futures.
      • Present the Concepts. Introduce the ideas of the Stabilization Triangle and its eight “wedges”.
      • Introduce the Technologies. Briefly describe the 15 wedge strategies identified by CMI, then have students familiarize themselves with the strategies as homework. Participants are free to critique any of the wedge strategies that CMI has identified, and teams should feel free to use strategies not on our list.
      • Form Teams. Teams of 3 to 6 players are best, and it is particularly helpful to have each student be an appointed “expert” in a few of the technologies to promote good discussions. You may want to identify a recorder and reporter in each group.
      • Explain the Rules. See instructions in Student Game Materials at back of packet

    Learning Activities

    Lesson Procedure/Methodology
    1. Playing the Game (40 minutes)
      a. Filling in the Stabilization Triangle. Teammates should work together to build a team stabilization triangle using 8 color-coded wedges labeled with specific strategies. Many strategies can be used more than once.
      b. Wedge Worksheet. Each team should fill in one stabilization wedge worksheet to make sure players haven’t violated the constraints of the game, to tally costs, and to predict judges’ ratings of their solution.
      NOTE: Costs are for guidance only – they are not meant to be used to produce a numerical score that wins or loses the game! c. Reviewing the Triangle. Each team should review the strengths and weaknesses of its strategies in preparation for reporting and defending its solutions to the class.
    2. Reports (depending on the number of groups this may require an additional class period)
      a. Representatives from each team will defend their solutions to the class in a 5-minute report. The presentation can be a simple verbal discussion by the group or a reporter designated by the group. If additional time is available, the presentations could include visual aids, such as a poster, PowerPoint presentation, etc.
      b. Students should address not only the technical viability of their wedges, but also the economic, social, environmental and political implications of implementing their chosen strategies on a massive scale.
    3. Judging In CMI workshops, the teams’ triangles have been judged by experts from various global stakeholder groups, such as an environmental advocacy organization, the auto industry, a developing country, or the U.S. Judging ensures that economic and political impacts are considered and emphasizes the need for consensus among a broad coalition of stakeholders. For a classroom, judges can be recruited from local government, colleges, businesses, and non-profit organizations, or a teacher/facilitator can probe each team about the viability of its strategies.

    Culminating Activity

    Closure/Assessment of Student Learning
    In addition to addressing the game and lessons learned, discussion questions are provided below that give opportunity to develop and assess the students’ understanding of the wedges concept and its applications.
    1) Given physical challenges and risks, how many wedges do you think each wedge strategy can each realistically provide?
    2) In choosing wedge strategies, it’s important to avoid double counting – removing the same emissions with two different strategies. For example, there are 6 strategies for cutting emissions from electricity, but we project only 5 wedges worth of carbon produced from the electric sector 50 years from now. Can you think of reasons, other than the adoption of alternative or nuclear energy, that emissions from electricity would be lower or higher than we predict? Examples: increased use of carbon-intensive coal versus natural gas (higher), slower population growth (lower), substitution of electricity for fuel, as via plug-in electric cars (higher).
    3) Industrialized countries and developing countries now each contribute about half the world’s emissions, although the poorer countries have about 85% of the world’s population. (The U.S. alone emits one fourth of the world's CO2.) If we agree to freeze global emissions at current levels, that means if emissions in one region of the world go up as a result of economic/industrial development, then emissions must be cut elsewhere. Should the richer countries reduce their emissions 50 years from now so that extra carbon emissions can be available to developing countries? If so, by how much?
    4) Nuclear energy is already providing one-half wedge of emissions savings – what do you think the future of these plants should be?
    5) Automobile emissions are a popular target for greenhouse gas cuts. What percent of greenhouse gases do you think come from the world’s passenger vehicles? (answer: about 18%)

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    (links in downloadable Lesson Plan) • Climate Game Gives Real Options to Save World, NPR, 2007
    • Stabilization Wedges: Solving the Climate Problem for the Next 50 Years with Current Technologies
    S. Pacala and R. Socolow, Science, 2004.
    • Solving the Climate Problem: Technologies for Curbing CO2 emissions (PDF)
    R. Socolow, R. Hotinski, J. Greenblatt, S. Pacala, Environment, 2004
    • Can We Bury Global Warming? (PDF)
    R. Socolow, Scientific American, 2005.
    • A Plan to Keep Carbon in Check (PDF)
    R. Socolow and S. Pacala, Scientific American, 2006.

    Have students complete the following:
    Do you think the government should try to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases even if it slows down the growth in your country’s standard of living?
    a) Which of the following answers do you think is the best one?
    1) No, I don’t think the government should make any effort to reduce these emissions
    2) No, the government should only take measures to reduce emissions that do not harm business or slow down growth.
    3) Yes, measures that leads to a slight reduction in growth is worth it as long as we still get richer year by year
    4) Yes, we should do whatever it takes to reduce these emissions even if it costs us quite a bit
    b) Write a text (100–300 words) where you give the reasons for your answer in
    a). What will be the consequences for our way of living?
    Mathematical: Imagine that you buy a cotton sweater made in China. Make an overview of the various parts of the production, transport, marketing and sale of the sweater and how each part implies the use of energy
    Poem writing: write a poem about what nature might look like in the future for your grandchildren if we do nothing about climate change
    Create A map with co2 emission globally. You may use these websites to do your country research:
    CountryWatch.com (http://aol.countrywatch.com/) Country @ a Glance (http://cyberschoolbus.un.org/infonation/index.asp)
    Encarta Encyclopedia (http://encarta.msn.com/artcenter_/browse.html)

    Community Connections

    Check your local environment Find out how your local community is encouraging (or discouraging?) a "climate-friendly" lifestyle: Does it have well-functioning public transport, bicycle paths, recycling bins, etc.?

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: A Taste of Soil

    Written By: Margaret Johnson
    Grade Level: 4th grade North Dakota studies (may be adapted to other elementary grade levels)

    Time Allotment

    2 or more classes: 50 minute class periods. Further exploration of these concepts can go into additional class times.

    Overview

    Prior to unit study, students will create a sketch book/journal to record their discoveries. Students will watch the Dirt Detectives video clip prior to creating their sketch book as well as a website about soil painting. Students will tour and explore the travel site: “Round America Tour” and end up on “The Enchanted Highway” by Regent, ND or state chosen. Students will learn about one or more regional artists while creating art that supports the knowledge they are gaining about North Dakota or state chosen. In doing so; Science, Math, Social Studies and Language Arts will be integrated into this unit of study.

    Supplemental Material
    Download Lesson Plan
    Download Powerpoint

    Subject Matter

    Visual Art with connections to Math, Social Studies, Science and Language Arts.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will
    • learn a very basic bookbinding technique incorporating a dimensional object and simple fastening method.
    • learn how to use “soil” as a painting medium for the books’ cover.
    • recognize that a handmade book is a work of art in itself.
    • achieve step one in the creation of a finished piece of personal value.
      • The art of creating the book will continue as a sketchbook, writing surface or scrapbook.
    • learn about one or more regional artists
    • create a 3D sculpture using recycled materials.
    • create a one point perspective drawing.
    • explore various websites
    • investigate and research a chosen state
    • recognize landscapes in viewing artwork
    • identify specific features of a chosen state
    • understands that seasons change repetitively
    • describes differences between 2D and 3D
    • draws pictures to solve problems
    • investigates soil properties
    • learn about artist Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night

    Materials

    Websites
    Soil kit from Courtney Kastning Urban Conservationist Cass County (ND) Soil Conservation District (701) 282-2157 x3.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Minnesota Soil Conservation: Minnesota Soil Conservation Moorhead, MN
    Round America Tour ( tour the U.S. and learn about each state-even where the best pie is!)
    Virtual Tour of the Enchanted Highway
    Worlds largest scrap metal sculptures
    Roadside offbeat tourist attractions
    Facts and photos about the area of Regent, ND and the Enchanted Highway
    Soil painting
    Painting with Soil—Jan Lang's Images of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
    Soils and landscapes of MN
    Minnesota Legacy Production website featuring one of our local potters; Brad Bachmeier and The Rourke Art Museum; a regional art museum
    PBS Teachers “Eco Investigators”

    Video Clips
    Dirt Detectives – Sid the Science Kid: (1 minute 34sec.)
    http://pbskids.org/sid/videoplayer.html?pid=gYvfY6Z9BbA5DdKeZvy_epJEqEdB4cjs
    1.5 minute video clip about the Enchanted Highway:
    http://www.learn360.com/Search.aspx?SearchText=Enchanted%20Highway%20artist
    1 hour video about Vincent Van Gogh:
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?SearchText=artwork&ID=226959
    4 minute video clip about VanGoghs artwork:
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?SearchText=Vincent+van+Gogh&ID=479295
    6 min. 56 seconds video on regional artwork:
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/historical-and-culture-society-of-clay-county
    4 minute video of artwork from the region:
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/james-orourke
    5 minute 42 seconds video to view Rourke Art Museum:
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/rourke-art-museum art to view
    3 min. 30 sec. video on regional artist, Brad Bachmeier:
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/brad-bachmeier

    Multimedia Tools
    Avervision document camera, Projector, HP Computer, Internet access. Starry Night art print by Vincent Van Gogh (optional)

    Materials: 1st session/Setting the Stage There’s more to dirt than meets the eye! - Video Clip of Sid the Science Kid/Dirt Detectives
    Soil can also be used to paint with! - Painting with Soil—Jan Lang's Images of the Lewis and Clark Expedition
    9x12 gray construction paper (1 piece per student)
    12 squares of white toilet paper, torn into 1 inch strips
    Soil kit from Courtney Kastning Urban Conservationist Cass County (ND) Soil Conservation District (701) 282-2157 x3 .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    Minnesota Soil Conservation
    Paint Brush (1 each)
    Tablespoon
    Acrylic Medium 16 oz. jar (watered down Elmer’s glue all will work)
    3 ounce plastic cups (for mixing soil paints) the number of cups depends on how many different soil types you have to use 3 ounce plastic cups
    3 ounce plastic cups (for watered down plain acrylic medium/consistency of cream)
    Different types of tree bark

    Materials: 2nd Session-Learning
    -Small twigs approx. 10 inches long (walk to a park or neighborhood to find these on the ground)
    -Twine (2 feet per student) opt. 1 rubber band/student
    -Scissors
    -White copy paper (10 pieces per student)
    -HB Pencil (1 each)
    -Magic Rub Eraser (1 each)

    Materials: 3rd and/or more Sessions – Learning/Culminating Activities
    -9 x 12 construction paper/your color choice (1 piece/student)
    -HB Pencil (1 each)
    -Magic Rub Eraser (1 each)
    -Crayola Oil Pastels (1 box of 24 per 4 students)
    -Ruler (1 per student)
    -Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night art print and short video clips about Van Gogh
    -Chosen videos and/or video clips listed under media resource, depending on what other lessons you are planning to teach.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Preview and set up media components.
      • Computer
      • Avervision
      • Lesson on hard drive or flash drive
      • Projector that will allow computer hook-up
      • Screen or wall on which to project image
    2. Prepare materials – Prior to starting unit
      • Cut construction papers into 9x12
      • Cut twine into 2 foot lengths
      • Tear off 12 squares of toilet paper per student
      • Have websites bookmarked on computer
      • Put 1-2 Tbsp. of soil into each cup (approx.. 2/3 full)
      • Add enough water to each cup to make a batter the consistency of a “mud brownie”. Stir until combined
      • Add about one tablespoon of acrylic medium to each cup. Stir until combined and smooth. More medium can be added to get the right consistency. (Add liquids sparingly so not to dilute the soil too much so the color does not come through well when painting). Cover until needed.
      • Dilute plain acrylic medium with water in 3 oz. cups to a creamy consistency. Cover until needed.

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Overview of North Dakota unit:
      • Students will create a hand- made sketch book using soil painting techniques on the book cover to mimic tree bark. (observation of tree bark-science)
      • Students will explore the Soil Painting site which includes a Regional Historical connection with Lewis and Clark (social studies)
      • Students will tour and explore the travel site: “Round America Tour” and end up on “The Enchanted Highway” by Regent, ND or state chosen. (Students may go to the computer lab with the teacher; each student can search and explore on their own computer. OR. Teacher may explore the site on the Smart Board or Avervision/overhead projector on screen as a whole class.
      • Students will learn about one or more regional artists while creating art that supports the knowledge they are gaining about North Dakota or state chosen.
      • Students will view and discuss Starry Night by Vincent Van Gogh
      • Students will draw pictures to solve problems whether 2D or 3D (math)
      • Students will write facts they have learned to improve comprehension (language arts)
      • In doing so; Science, Math, Social Studies and Language Arts will be integrated into this unit of study.
    2. Activities
      • Observe different examples of tree bark from different trees. Look closely at the colors and textures of each example.
      • Observe the different soils from ND and MN, looking closely at the different colors of the soil and its properties (science). *Soil is one of our most important natural resources.
      • Create sketch book covers to mimic tree bark. Explain that these sketch books will reference our learning throughout the unit as well as planning out our artwork ideas.
    3. Demonstration on creating sketch book covers begins our learning activities.
      1. Pass out materials:
        • 9x12 gray construction paper (put name on back of paper), paint brushes-1 each
        • 12 squares of toilet paper per student
        • Soil paint mixture in cups- 4 different types of soil per 4 students/table
        • Watered down acrylic medium – 1 small cup for 4 students/table
      2. Demonstrate as students follow along:
        • Tear the 12 squares of toilet paper into 1 inch strips all at the same time
        • Paint gray construction paper with watered down acrylic medium
        • Overlap the 1 inch strips of toilet paper on top of the acrylic medium, covering the entire piece of gray construction paper.
        • Using one or more colors of soil paint, paint soil paints on top of the toilet paper strips, covering the entire page once again. Put on drying rack to dry. (Opt. When dry, more layers can be added to make the covers look more like tree bark.)


    Learning Activities

    Learning Activities

    Day 2.
    1. Demonstrate how to put together sketch books, following these directions:
      • Take your soil painted “faux” tree bark sketch book covers, fold in ½, cutting off any excess toilet paper strips off that may be hanging around the edges.
      • Pass out 10 white copy paper pages to each student, fold in ½.
      • Pass out one 10 in. twig and one, 2 foot piece of twine to each student
      • Put the 10 papers inside the sketch book cover, folding all papers in ½. Cut approximately a one inch slit on the top and bottom of the books fold.
      • Place twig on the outside of the folded book and wrap twine around the top and bottom of the twig while also wrapping the twine around the middle of the folded book.
      • Tie book together in a bow tie/double tied so it does not come apart.


    2. Explore “Round America Tour” website- touring 50 states:
      • Complete information about the trip Round America is detailed as part of the web site. To begin reading, I recommend that you read the Trip Overview to learn about what prompted the trip, the planning and Rules of the Road. Then click on any link on our toolbar to read about what's most important to you. If you want to take the trip, go to the Daily Journal page, and start at Day 1 and work your way through to Day 148. If you want to read about a specific state, go to the Cities & States page, and click on the state or states of interest to you. If pie is your thing, the Pie We've Eaten section includes complete details on the 181 pieces of pie consumed. If you like statistics, the Trip Scorecard page is interesting and fun.
      • Focus on day 107, in ND, touring the Enchanted Highway: http://www.roundamerica.com/trip/journal/day107.htm
      • Begin a 2D or 3D artwork-Demo/Discuss/View
      Discussion Topics
      • 3D sculptures created by recycled materials
      • Seasons, life cycles, animals in the area
      • Landforms
      • Soils
      • Climate
      • Compare and contrast 2D and 3D
      • Lewis and Clark


    Day3 and more (options)
    1. Take a Virtual Tour of the Enchanted Highway: http://www.learn360.com/Search.aspx?SearchText=Enchanted%20Highway%20artist
    2. In sketch book
      • Define one point perspective in writing
      • Plan out One Point Perspective landscape of ND.
    3. Draw, using pencil, the finalized plan onto 9x12 construction paper (final paper)
    4. Demonstrate how to use oil pastels, blending color into color to create depth and value (darks and lights of objects)
    5. Students colorize landscape using oil pastels.
    6. View Starry Night art print by Vincent Van Gogh, focusing on the night time sky.
    7. View short video clips about Van Gogh
    8. Learn 360
    9. Create their sky in the same manner as Van Gogh using swirled and segmented lines
    10. Sign artwork on bottom right.
    11. Explore 3D art using recycled materials
    12. Research travel brochures.
    13. Write to organize and develop ideas
    14. Visualize and verbalize in sketchbook for understanding and comprehension

    Culminating Activity

    After creating the hands-on artwork assignment(s), students will:
    Visual Art
    - Display finished artwork within their school.
    - Using their hand made sketch books; students can share and reflect with peers. Option: Sketch books may be used throughout the year as a journal to document other assignments.
    - Each student can verbalize about their artwork using academic terms (terms to be taught in a given course) (e.g. composition the arrangement of parts in an artwork to create unity, one-point perspective a way of showing depth in a picture).

    Language Art
    Write in their hand made sketch book:
    - the objectives of the lesson
    - soil properties
    - facts about ND and the Enchanted Highway (or state chosen)
    - use academic terms (art words) to describe their finished artwork
    - use for reference
    Draw/Illustrate:
    - Thumbnail sketches (small) to plan and/or write other ideas

    Science
    - Describe repetitive and irregular changes in seasons and erosion – verbal and/or written.
    Social Studies
    - Identify the location/region of the Enchanted Highway in North Dakota
    Math
    - Use a variety of strategies to solve problems; drawing pictures to plan out the finished artwork.
    - Describe the attributes of two- and three-dimensional shapes

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    • Visual Art - paint with soils, one point perspective drawing, composition, graphic design (travel brochures)
    • Science - recycled materials (3D art), seasons, soil properties
    • Social Studies - land formations, climate, characteristics of significant features of ND
    • Math - Draw pictures to solve problems, describe 2D and 3D shapes
    • Language Arts - write to understand and improve comprehension

    Community Connections

    • MN Soil Conservation: http://www.co.clay.mn.us/Depts/SoilWatr/SoilWatr.htm
    • ND Soil Conservation soil kit: .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)
    • Plains Art Museum: http://plainsart.org/exhibits/ Students in North Dakota and northern Minnesota can relate to many of the artworks found at the Plains Art Museum in Fargo, ND. The art exhibits change throughout the year, so I am providing this link that could be used to preview and select an art work that will complement the lesson. (Art works always need to be previewed for appropriateness before displaying them for students.) North Dakota artist, Walter Piehl, would be a good artist choice because he has art work in the Plains Art Museum’s permanent collection. One of Piehl’s rodeo prints is available through the museum and has educational information on the back. Fargo art teachers use this print as a fourth grade teaching tool
    • The Rourke Art Museum in Moorhead, MN (regional museum)
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/rourke-art-museum
    • Brad Bachmeier - local potter (soil connection) http://www.prairiepublic.org/television/minnesota-legacy-productions/brad-bachmeier

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Virtual Field Trips: "Touring the World in Your Classroom!"

    Written By: Mary Dalzell
    Grade Level: 3-5 (All virtual field trips may be adapted to any level.)

    Time Allotment

    This Unit Plan is designed to cover approximately 8 weeks of lessons. As an art teacher, I see students once a week. Therefore, the timeline has to be adjusted for how many time individual teachers will see their students per week. As an art teacher, I see students only once per week for 50 minutes.

    Overview

    In order to learn about French artists, I would like students to become excited about learning the many different aspects which influenced artists and also about the importance of art in the French culture. Therefore, the beginning of this unit will include a look at France and its location to the United States, a virtual tour of the muse d’Orsay Museum. As we progress into the lesson, we will learn more about individual French artists, their lives and their works.

    Download the Lesson Plan

    Download Supplemental Powerpoint

    Subject Matter

    Art History is the subject matter of this field trip; however, virtual field trip can be used for any subject matter.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will learn how to effectively use the Internet in order to learn about artists as well as using higher order thinking skills in order to compare and contrast various different French artists and their artworks. Students will use this knowledge in order to think critically about the creation of their own artworks.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    PBS Videos; Discovery Education Videos; Smart Board; Internet Virtual Tours

    Materials

    Computer and Internet access
    Various prints of different artworks
    Books on the lives of artists
    Music from the country of France
    Materials for creating various artworks.

    Teacher Preparation

    Students who come into the art room should feel like they are on a journey to France:
    • French Artwork Prints
    • French Music Pictures of French Artists: Monet, Van Gogh, Degas, Renior and Cezanne
    • Permission slips for parents to fill out for the Journey to France
    • Virtual tour ready for the field trip to the and Muse’e d’ Orsay
    • Virtual Field trips ready for artists:
    • Invitation forms for parents for the Gallery Show for the Journey to France Artworks

    Introductory Activities

    French Music: Yves Montand (A Paris) accompanied by Degas & Monet

    Weeks 1 & 2:
    Introduction to Journey to France: Where is France Located? Ariel view of a map of Paris:
    Launch Museum d’Orsay trip:
    Students will view the virtual tour as presented on the projector at the front of the class. This field trip will be teacher guided because there are some images which would not be appropriate for students to see. Students will have out their sketchbooks/journals to keep a field trip log.

    Our 1st Virtual tour: the Musee d’Orsay. The largest gallery show of Impressionist Artwork.
    Our 1st tour of the Impressionist Gallery
    Our 2nd tour through the Musee d’ Orsay and introduction to our 1st Artist Mr. Claude Monet

    Introduction to Mr. Claude Monet
    Students will work then work in groups of 2 on computers to look at:
    Monet's Sketchbooks

    While students browse online, this will help them discover how many of Monet’s beautiful paintings began with sketches; during this time they will be taking notes in their sketchbooks to generate ideas. After students have looked at Monet’s black and white sketches, they will now have the excitement of browsing online to see Monet’s beautiful paintings. Welcome to Monet's

    Learning Activities

    Students will choose one of their drawings in their sketchbooks to use as an inspiration for an impressionistic picture. Students will now begin to work on their pictures using 11” by 17” watercolor paper. They will sketch lightly with pencil. When complete, they will begin to paint. Students will keep in mind how the impressionists painted with dabs of color in order to capture the light reflected off of objects. While student are working, the teacher will observe and assist when needed. Students will be reminded that at the end of our Virtual tour we will be having a gallery show in which their parents have received invitations to attend.

    Weeks 3 & 4:
    Our 3rd Journey through the Musee d’Orsay and Introduction to our Artist Vincent Van Gogh

    Introduction to My. Vincent Van Gogh
    We will look at the second stop of our tour which is the Vincent Van Gogh gallery. We will talk about his different artworks, his use of line and color. Students will take notes in their sketchbooks, as we look at Van Gogh’s various works. I will also have various vocabulary words posted throughout the room which are connected to our Visual Art Standards and Benchmarks.

    We will then go to the Metropolitan Museum site How Van Gogh Made His Mark
    This interactive exploration of four landscape drawings introduces young visitors to the creative genius of Van Gogh the draftsman

    Explore Van Gogh This is a wonderful interactive site which gives information on Vincent’s biography, his drawings and his unique line quality. Finally students can test their own drawing skills by using an online tool to draw their own picture by using hatching, cross hatching lines, stippling and other techniques. They can then print their completed picture.

    Activity
    Working in small groups, students can create sketches, small paintings, or a 3D representation of Van Gogh’s room. They can also sculpt a model-magic figure of the artist Vincent Van Gogh. They will be reminded that there will be group discussions about their artwork at the end of our Journey

    Weeks 5 & 6:
    Our 4th Journey through the Musee ’Orsay and Introduction to Edgar Degas

    Introduction to Mr. Edward Degas

    We will return to our tour of the Musee d’Orsay to view Degas’s artwork. We will see his beautiful paintings as well as his lovely ballerina sculptures. While we look at Degas’s artworks, students will also take notes in their sketch book journals, do thumbnail sketches as well as write down vocabulary words.

    Next we will return the Metropolitan Museum, to see the following online interactive site: The Dancers and Degas Join special guests on a visit to the galleries and find out what dancers can tell us about Edgar Degas. Listen, look, and create your own sketch in this fun activity for all ages.

    Activity: After viewing this site in groups of 2, the students will be encouraged to participate in the different activities suggested in this site: such as doing gesture drawings in their sketchbook or writing an original story in their sketchbooks about one of the paintings or sculptures. They can also create a computer drawing with the program, which then can be printed and colored. Finally, they can send an E-card with one Degas’s pictures. Older students will be encouraged to try to create their own virtual field trip with Tour-Maker. They will be encouraged to choose one of the artists in which they could study the artist in a more thorough manner.

    Weeks 7 & 8:
    Our 5th and last Journey through the Musee d’Orsay and Introduction to Pierre-Auguste Renoir

    Introduction to Mr .Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Paul Cezanne

    The Following are links which students can browse works of art by the artist Renoir:
    Dancers
    Landscapes
    Still Life


    And then we will move on to Cez’anne at the Metropolitan Museum link:
    Cézanne's Astonishing Apples
    Paul Cézanne said, "I will astonish Paris with an apple!" Have some fun while you play with shapes, listen to a story, and learn all about Cézanne's "Still Life with Apples and a Pot of Primroses"
    This is a very informative site for students. Here the students can learn about Cézanne’s life and works. They can also take a quiz about his life. They can also send a E-card with a picture of his work. Activity: A still-life with fruit will be set up. Students will first do thumb nail sketches of the still-life in their journals, as well as writing down the vocabulary for the lesson. The students then will be given paper, pencils and oil pastels in order to create a still-life. A floral still-life will also be set up and students will also be able to choose this type of drawing as well. Students can also write a poem which will describe their still-life using descriptive colors in their journal.

    Culminating Activity

    Students will create a Smart Board portrait, still-life or landscape which was inspired by an artist as a presentation for their peers. Students will be reminded that there will be the upcoming gallery show with their parents which will be a celebration of their artwork and their learning.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Leaves, Don't “Leave” Them Alone!

    Written By: Susan Yeske
    Grade Level: Pre-primary through Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    30-40 minutes

    Overview

    This lesson provides students with the opportunity to use leaves that are found in the students' environment to help reinforce the skills of sorting/comparing, graphing, reading graphs, writing sentences, reading sight words and adapted to provide practice of using a switch to orally read a mini- book. This lesson has many hands on approaches where the students are using their hands with real objects (leaves) to sort, graph, compare, and describe.

    Supplemental Material:
    Downloadable Lesson Plan
    Powerpoint Leaf Presentation

    Subject Matter

    Math, Writing, Reading, Science

    Learning Objectives

    The students will be able to sort the leaves by size. The students will be able to chart the leaves by size. The students will be able to analyze the data and make statements based on the data collected. The students will be able to read an adapted story, accessed by an adapted computer. The students will be able to construct simple sentences using kindergarten sight words.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Leaf Investigation
    Leaves Are Cool
    Le Leaf Bistro

    Materials

    For a group of 2-4 students and one teacher
    10 different leaves making particular attention to pick leaves that can be sorted by big/small size
    Large graphing template (see example below)
    White board/markers
    Tape/Thumb tacks
    Internet connection with ability for students to watch video
    USB Interface
    1 switch
    1 picture of large red leaf
    1 picture of small red leaf
    1 picture of large brown leaf
    1 picture of small brown leaf
    Boardmaker/Picture It pictures with words above the pictures of sight words (the, red, brown, big small, leaf and is)

    Teacher Preparation

    Collect 10-15 leaves-trying to get large and small leaf samples.
    Prepare chart template to be able to chart leave attributes
    load video and/or bookmark links for ease
    Print 4 pictures of leaves showing 2 different sizes of 2 colors (1 large red leaf, 1 small red leaf, 1 small brown leaf, and 1 large brown leaf)
    Print symbol based words to form into sentences-laminate and back with magnets for future use

    Introductory Activities

    1. To get my students ready to look at different leaves and get them interested in the activities, have them watch Sid the Science Kid “Leaf Investigation” video clip. This clip shows kids selecting leaves outside and then later sorting the leaves into different piles based on different attributes.
    2. I would also allow my student a chance to play with the leaves and be able to touch and feel them so that they will be able to focus more on the actual lesson when we get to handling the leaves.

    Learning Activities

    1. Set the stage by playing Sid the Science Kid “Leaf Investigation” Video clip. Say “Ok kindergarteners, play close attention to the part in the clip where the students are sorting the leaves”. During clip when you start to see the teacher cutting leaves and then kids start to lay them out on paper stop clip and say “look closely and see what they are doing because we will be doing this soon”.
    2. Lay out leaves for students to touch and feel. Say “class here is your chance to touch and feel the leaves. Make sure you turn them over and see both sides.” Give each student personal attention and ask them what they see and feel. Help them use words to describe the leaf that they are touching”. Give them 3 minute warning when activity will be changing.
    3. Say “lets look at the leaves now.” Ask individual students to describe their leaf. Say “What do you see...can you tell your friends about your leaf?” When each student has a chance to describe a few leaves, then collect them back on teacher control- laying them out so that they all can be seen. Say “I am looking over the leaves and I see some look the same. I am thinking how I can sort these leaves...hmm I see that I could sort these leaves into two different piles one pile can be for the leaves that are big and the other pile can be for the leaves that are small...So I want each of you to take a few leaves and lets sort them into two piles. This area (show where to put) we are going to put the small leaves and this area we are going to put the big leaves.” Allow students opportunity to sort leaves. If student does not put in correct spot, talk them through why it would not go well in the place that they selected. Say “Eyes on me...good sorting, I see that you all put the small leaves in this area and I also see that you put the big leaves in this area...Ok now lets chart our leaf piles on to a graph and see what we can find out. So now eyes on the chart (display chart), in this column we are going to put the small leaves and in this column we are going to put the big leaves. I am going to ask that you come up here and put your leaf in the correct column.” (help each child put a piece of tape on each leaf so that they can stick in a column. If I child makes a mistake, walk them through the correct placement of the leaf. ) When students have placed all of the leaves in the correct column then total the leaves up.
    4. Ask the students, “which column has more leaves...which column has less leaves” Walk them through comparing using more and less terminology.
    5. When leaf sorting activity is completed. Say “we are now going to read a book that some students have made about leaves. Remember that sometimes students are not able to talk on their own, but they are able to talk using other ways.” Cue up Tar Hill Reader. Ask “which voice do you want to listen to the story with?” Have student hit switch to advance to next page. During the book Ask “do we have an example of ____ leaf” Talk about pages and see if students can relate their leaves to the pictures of the leaves on book.
    6. Pass out Board Maker pictures and review sight words above each picture. Say “we are going to review some of your sight words that you have been working on to describe these leaf pictures. One at a time hold up the pictures that represent the, big, red, brown, little, and is. Review words until class is again comfortable with pictures and words.
    7. Hold up picture of big red leaf and ask “using your sight words, tell me about this leaf” Students will describe leaf....Say “ok group, lets use our words/pictures to write a sentence describing this leaf. (Answer The big leaf is red. Or The red leaf is big.” Do the same for small red leaf, big brown leaf, and small brown leaf.
    8. Say “Eyes on your sentences that you wrote, lets read them again, paying close attention to your sight words”
    9. Review lessons of day say “we have worked really hard to day by first looking at our leaves that we have collected, then we sorted the leaves and charted them. Finally we have reviewed our sight words and wrote sentences using our words. Tomorrow we are going to talk about leaves that we eat. So to let you know what we are going to do tomorrow I want you to watch Sid The Science kid, talk about leaves that are eaten by animals and people.
    10. Cue up “Le Leaf Bistro” and allow students to watch.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Reading:
    Books that pertain to lesson:
    • Why Do Leaves Change Color? By Betsy Maestro
    • Ruby's Falling Leaves by Rosemary Wells
    • Leaf Jumpers by Carole Gerber
    Writing
    • Write pen pal and ask about their trees around their school
    • Make book about trees around school
    Math:
    • Color identification
    • Use cut outs of leaves to put written numbers in order
    • Use leaves to make AB or ABC pattern on calendar
    • Count leaves for 1:1 practice
    • Talk about what the leaves look like in the different seasons
    Science:
    • Discuss different uses for leaves; what animals use leaves for
    • Discuss plant life cycle

    Community Connections

    • Students can collect leaves from home and bring in to discuss, display
    • Go to a nature area or park to collect leaves
    • Ask teachers to bring in leaves from their favorite trees and make book about them
    • Write letter to pen pal asking about their favorite tree or what happens to the trees during their season changes
    Sample of chart that would need to be made prior to lesson and made on bulletin board (found in Downloadable Lesson Plan found in the Overview section

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Art of the Handmade Book

    Written By: Debra L. Knutson
    Grade Level: Elementary School

    Time Allotment

    Varies by grade level;
    Elementary Lesson: Single Sheet Pop-Out, from two to five class periods*
    Secondary Lesson: Altered Art Book, sixteen class periods*
    *Teachers can adjust the length of time for these projects according to how simple or complex the lesson plans may be.

    Overview

    Creating Books to Use in the Classroom
    Two examples of bookmaking techniques for elementary and secondary teachers

    Elementary Lesson: Single Sheet Pop-Out
    The student will:
    • Use a single sheet of construction paper to create a simple book that may contain both text and images.
    • Follow directions of book construction using the lesson from the Minnesota Center for Book Arts, see attached sheet.

    • Experiment with variations using pop-out examples.
    Secondary Lesson: Altered Art Books
    Students will create an altered book that communicates information about themselves. It is similar to a time capsule, although it is done using the book form as the vehicle.

    Download Lesson Plan

    Subject Matter

    Art, with interdisciplinary connections to language arts, science, math, and social studies, as well as other subject areas, including music and theater arts.

    Learning Objectives

    Elementary Lesson
    Creating a book is a way for students of all ages to create meaning and gain knowledge in any given subject matter. It is an inter-active activity that engages students in the learning process in a very personal and hands-on way.

    Secondary Lesson:
    The student will:
    • Transform a discarded book into a creative art work that encompasses an autobiographical theme. The student’s final project will utilize a variety of media and techniques including drawing, collage, painting and writing.
    • Understand the history of the book and be familiar with methods of altering books for creative purposes.
    • Create their own altered art book using the required contents listed on the checklist provided to them.
    •Evaluate their book and prepare it for public display.

    An altered book is the artistic process of changing an existing book to communicate a new message or to evoke a new response. Altered books are part of the larger, altered art, mixed media art movement.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Elementary Lesson
    Learn 360:Authors and Artists: Eric Carle, Tomie dePaola

    Secondary Lesson:
    Karen Whimsy
    Brain Dittmer
    MN Book Arts
    Altered Book
    Princeton Linda Books

    Materials

    Elementary Lesson:
    1 - 12”x18” construction paper, or adjust paper to desired size of finished book, tools needed include scissors and pencil, colored pencils, etc. optional.

    Secondary Lesson:
    Hardcover books, (old encyclopedias are my favorite) gesso, paint, drawing materials, variety of paper, glue, gloss medium and individual materials chosen by the student.

    Teacher Preparation

    Elementary Lesson:
    Practice the method used for construction of the book and prepare examples.

    Secondary Lesson:
    Research the topic of altered art books, refer to the following books for ideas, there are many books on this subject, these are just two of my favorites:

    Introductory Activities

    Follow directions of handout for pop-out book.

    Learning Activities

    Secondary Lesson:
    Lesson Plan:

    Day 1
    Introduce the lesson with the slideshow. Ask students questions about their favorite books when they were growing up. What kind of books did they like? Use bookmarked internet sites to show examples of this art form, including the following: karenswhimsy.com and briandittmeer.com

    Students receive their book to alter, and are given time to browse through it. Special pages that students think are interesting or significant are marked with a sticky note.

    Day 2
    Computer lab day. Students do research on book artists and techniques.

    Day 3
    Students word process their title page, dedication, and ‘About the Artist & Author’ pages. See attached examples for more specific information regarding criteria.

    Day 4
    Pages are ripped out of the book to make way for the addition of artwork in the six sections. Students remove one-third of the original pages by counting ten and ripping out five pages from front to back cover. Sections and pages are marked off with colored sticky notes labeled in order with the corresponding section. See handout. Each section is marked in order of the contents. Example: Title Page, section #1 drawing, section #2 collage, section #3 painting, etc. These six sections are all two page spreads.

    Day 5
    Begin glueing edges of pages in each section from the back of the book to the front. Hold pages in place using clamps and paper clips. Place wax paper between sections to prevent pages from sticking together.

    Day 6
    Gesso the collage for section #2 Day 7 & 8 Paint covers with acrylic paint, adding whatever creative touches that reinforce your theme.

    Day 9
    Add the memory drawing to section 1 by glueing in with liquid glue. Add and draw color out from edges with color pencils if the drawing is smaller than the pages of the book.

    Day 10
    Paint section #3 with watercolors. See website: karenswhimsy.com for ideas. Use text of the pages for the sentences you will create. Use underline or highlighter to accentuate the words you choose.

    Day 11
    Section #4, this is the section that is made up of personal photographs, students use four or more photos in this section. They also may include any poetry or writing done in their language arts class in this section. Students may use layout and design techniques using a variety of paper for background.

    Day 12
    Section #5, this is the “your choice” section. The student decides which technique to use in this section. It is a chance to make your own choices to communicate information you may want to include. Do independent research of websites and consider using ideas found on the altered art book websites for ideas, this may be another drawing collage, or painting.

    Day 13,14, 15
    Section #6, this is the hidden compartment. Use an Xacto-knife to cut away a shape for the hidden compartment section. This is the section where the meaningful object is contained.

    Day 16
    Student completes all remaining aspects of book project including final artist statement. Student completes self evaluation and prepares book for display.


    This is an example of a grading criteria I use in grading the student’s final project. I also have the student’s write an artist’s statement to go with their book.

    Culminating Activity

    Students can share their books with fellow students, read them to younger students and also display their work in the school setting, perhaps the school library.

    Community Connections

    The public library is an excellent place to display this project, as it promotes the importance of literacy in the creation of unique books.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Does That Character Reflect My Character?

    Written By: Julie Costello, Fargo Public Schools
    Grade Level: 4th - 6th Grade

    Time Allotment

    45 minute segments

    Overview

    The best way to tame a bully is with character education and lots of discussion and support. This unit uses the book One by Kathryn Otashi to introduce bullying, then utilizes movie clips to introduce and examine character traits. As a culminating activity, students make positive statements and photograph their words and put them into Photostory or MovieMaker for video.

    Subject Matter

    Bullying, character education, introduction to video using Photostory

    Learning Objectives

    Students learn to look objectively at clips from major motion pictures and make application to their lives. Students learn how to use Photostory and/or Moviemaker.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    • Video clips from major motion pictures available for purchase at http://www.filmclipsonline.com or available on Learn360.com
    • Photostory or MovieMaker
    • May incorporate websites for quotes

    Materials

    1. One by Kathryn Otashi; ISBN 978-09723946-4-2
    2. Avervision or projection plan for sharing book
    3. Short clips from selected videos; study guide available online at http://www.flimclipsonline.com; Today’s lessons are from http://www.filmclipsonline.com/downloads/EP4_STUDYGUIDE.pdf
    4. Paper for reflection (journal)
    5. Unlined paper
    6. Markers
    7. One camera for each group (share if necessary)

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Preread the book One and have it ready for presenting
    2. Bookmark or make playlist of clips you plan to use
    3. Logon and have clips ready on individual pages
    4. Paper and markers for students; digital camera
    5. Know how to use Photostory or MovieMaker

    Introductory Activities

    1. Discussion of bullying; reading the book One
      • What is a metaphor?
        • Something used to represent something else
        • This book is filled with metaphors; listening target: what metaphors are contained in the story
    2. Students have paper/journals for reflection

    Learning Activities

    1. Theme: Knowing Yourself
      • Independent thinking
        1. A teacher has a unique way of challenging students to think for themselves
        2. Explain “carpe diem” which means to “seize the day”
        3. What does conform mean?
          1. to comply or be like everyone else
          2. good/bad?
    2. Video: Dead Poets Society
    3. Reflection/Discussion
      1. Why do you think we find ourselves conforming to others?
        1. In the book, why didn’t the other colors stand up to red?
        2. Can you think of people who have had an effect historically because they didn’t conform?
          a. Rosa Parks, Sally Ride
      2. How important is it to fit in with the crowd?
    4. Theme: Facing Peer Pressure
      • Responsibility for Others
        1. The tough band director expects each band member to look out for the other to build a strong team
      • Video: Drumline
      • Reflection/Discussion
        1. What does the saying, “There is no I in team” mean? How is it reflected in this clip?
        2. What is the difference between helpful and harmful team pressure?
        3. Are we responsible for other’s actions?
    5. Theme: Facing Peer Pressure
      • Cliques as Bullies
        1. A home-schooled girl enters public high school and finds it can be pretty hard to fit in
        2. Define clique: A small group of people with shared interests, who spend time together and exclude others
      • Video: Mean Girls
      • Reflection/Discussion
        1. How can a clique be harmful?
        2. How can cliques control you?
        3. What are the rules your friends expect you to follow?

    Culminating Activity

    1. Divide into three groups – each group will be choosing a message to convey about their group. It is a good idea to give sites or have quotes for students to choose from unless you feel some are ready to make their own quotes, add pictures, etc.
      1. Group 1: Independent thinking
        1. Two roads diverged in a wood and I, I took the one less traveled by and that has made all the difference. –Robert Frost
        2. Understanding is the first step to acceptance, and only with acceptance can there be recovery. -J.K. Rowlingt
      2. Group 2: Responsibility for others
        1. Provision for others is a fundamental responsibility of human life. –Woodrow Wilson
        2. People don’t understand that not only can they make a difference, but it’s their responsibility to do so. –Florence Robinson
      3. Group 3: Standing up for yourself
        1. Do you want to be a power in the world? Be yourself. –Ralph Waldo Trine
        2. What is genius but the power of expressing a new individuality? –Elizabeth Barrett Browning
      4. Each group rewrites the quote grouping words as decided by the group.
      5. Photograph each page
      6. Import into Photostory or Movie Maker
      7. TaDa! You’ve made your own movie with a positive message

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      • This fits easily into Language Arts with writing activities
      • Have students read biographies/newspaper or magazine articles identifying how people have overcome struggles

      Community Connections

      • Invite community leaders to share struggles they have overcome
      • Students ask television to run positive messages which they have created
      • Students give awards to people in the community who serve as positive role models; students design an award and vote each month as to who in the community receives the award

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: "Spirit Wolf": Fact or Legend?

    Written By: Shelly Gilson
    Grade Level: 3-6

    Time Allotment

    1 hour. Read “Old Three Legs,” story. Activate prior knowledge.
    1/2 hr. Map skills. Six counties. Outline “Old Three Legs,” reign of terror.
    1/2 hr. View video clips & pictures.
    1 1/2 hr. Museum tour. Draw wolf.
    2-5 hrs. Create own Legend.
    1/2 hr. Share with our Kindergarten Buddies

    Overview

    Teacher finds a highly motivating story for students from the local Museum, Storyteller, Grandparent, etc.
    View WDAY news clip, Call of the Wild Program video, & pictures. Students read story, discuss vocabulary,(using QAR:question/answer relationship), to enhance comprehension, test taking & content area.
    Students learn map skills using the MN county map, find the 6 counties & highlight. Briefly review numerical data on county map. (population)
    Students tour the Becker County Museum, view the Les Kouba print & recreate “Old Three Legs”.
    Culminating Activity: Students will write their own story/legend about a native animal of MN & list 6 counties that it terrorized or enhanced.
    Share stories with Kindergarten Buddies

    Supplemental Materials
    Lesson Plan Vocabulary Sheet Article

    Shory Stories
    Old 3 Legs
    Short Story 1
    Short Story 2
    Short Story 3

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts (Reading Text Writing Story)
    Social - County Map of MN, history
    Art - Drawing Wolf

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to: read unfamiliar complex & multi-syllabic words using advanced phonetic & structural analysis in grade-appropriate text. Read aloud narrative text with fluency, accuracy & appropriate pacing, intonation & expression.
    The student will use a variety of strategies to expand reading, listening & speaking vocabularies. The student will understand the meaning of texts using a variety of strategies & will demonstrate literal, interpretive, inferential & evaluative comprehension. The student will actively engage in the reading process & read, understand, respond to, analyze, interpret, evaluate & appreciate a wide variety of fiction. The student will compose various pieces of writing. The student will engage in writing, with attention to organization, focus & quality of ideas. The student will demonstrate understanding & communicate effectively through listening & speaking. The student will critically analyze information found in electronic & print media, & will use a variety of these sources to learn about a topic & represent ideas. The student will write legibly & use a keyboard. The student will demonstrate an understanding of cultural & historical forms or traditions of visual arts. The student will use maps, globes, geographic information systems, & other sources of information to analyze the nature of places at a variety of scales. The student will analyze historical evidence & draw conclusions. The student will compare & order whole numbers using place value.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    • Outdoor TV Show-”Call of the Wild” 1980’s
    • News clip on WDAY
    • ACS 2009: Tour of Museum & Old 3 Legs Restoration

    Materials

    • CD: Pure Nature: International Wolf Center, Ely, MN. 1998:#362292.
    • Video Clips “Old Three Legs,” stories
    • Writing & Drawing paper
    • Clipboards
    • Map of MN counties
    • Vocabulary Sheet

    Teacher Preparation

    Focus for Media Interaction: “Spirit Wolf”: Fact or Legend? Students need to write down facts, & myths/legends from the video clips.

    Introductory Activities

    1. CD: Wolf Songs
    2. Read 1st two paragraphs
    3. Video Clips ready

    Learning Activities

    1. Read text(while listening to CD)
    2. Watch video clips
    3. Map skills
    4. Visit Museum
    5. Draw wolf & background(talk about wildlife artist: Les Kouba)
    6. Write own Legends: trying to use native animals to MN. (deer, fox, prairie chickens, muskie, walleye, sunfish, grouse, pheasants, wolverine, fisher, etc.)
    7. Share with Kindergarten Buddies

    Culminating Activity

    1. Visit Museum
    2. Write a legend about MN animals that terrorize or enhance 6 different counties in MN.
    3. Share with our Kindergarten Buddies.

    Community Connections

    Becker County Museum, Director: Carrie Johnson
    ACS: Video Clip

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Listen, Record, Remember; Family Oral History Project

    Written By: Melinda Crimmins
    Grade Level: 8-12

    Time Allotment

    Approximately 5-7 50 minute class periods with students conducting interviews outside of class.


    Overview

    After reading a short memoir and reviewing the genre, students will create their own memoir along with memoirs of family members. Students select a family member to interview, craft a set of interview questions, create a written document (essay or transcript) of the interview and electronically publish it along with an audio oral history.

    Supplemental Materials Lesson Plan
    Interview Essay
    Memoir Rubric 1
    Memoir Rubric
    Podcasting Audio Only Instructions
    Interview Essay
    Transcribing an Oral History

    Subject Matter

    English/Language
Arts
 


    Learning Objectives

    1. Using multiple sources of information students will build literacy skills and gain an appreciation of the importance of narrative and history in their lives by creating their own personal memoir and interviewing family members.
    2. Students shall demonstrate understanding of the techniques and process of digital story telling and digital recording of oral histories. 


    Media Components - Video/Web

    Autistic
 Basketball
 Manager's
 20 
Point 
Game
    Everybody
 Has
 a
 Story
 Flashback: 
Veteran
    Sources
 for
 Audio:
    The
 Free Sound
 Project
    Flash
 Kit 
Sound
 Loops
    Flash
 Kit 
Sound
 FX
    A1 
Free 
Sound
 Effects
    Documentary Sound
    American Radio Works
    History and Politics Out Loud

    Materials

    Memoirs 
to 
Consider:
    
 Gates, Henry Louis Jr. Colored People
    
 Kaysen, Susanna. Girl, Interrupted
    
 Wolff, Tobias. This Boy’s Life.
    
 Russell Baker, Growing Up
    
 Jim Barnes, On Native Ground
    
 Lan Cao, Monkey Bridge
    
 Jimmy Carter, An Hour Before Daylight
    
 Stephen Church, The Guiness Book of Me
    
 Bill Clinton, My Life
    
 Joan Didion, The Year of Magical Thinking
    
 Annie Dillard, An American Childhood
    
 Mark Doty, Firebird
    
 Dave Eggers, A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering
    
 Genius Helen Freemont, After Long Silence
    
 James Frey, A Million Little Pieces
    
 Elizabeth Gold, Brief Intervals of Horrible Sanity
    
 Brendan Halpin, Losing My Faculties—A Teacher's Story
    
 Adam Harmon, Lonely Soldier
    
 Stephen King, On Writing Maxine
    
 Hong Kingston, The Woman Warrior: Memoirs of a Girlhood among Ghosts
    
 Annie Lamont, Bird by Bird
    
 Beryl Markham, West with the Night
    
 Nathan McCall, Makes Me Wanna Holler
    
 Frank McCourt, Teacher Man and Angela’s Ashes
    
 William Alexander Percy, Lanterns on the Levee: Recollections of a Planter’s Son
    
 Ruth Reichl, Garlic and Sapphires, Comfort Me With Apples, and Tender at the Bone
    
 Amy Krouse Rosenthal, Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life
    
 Elie Wiesel, Night
    
 


    Teacher Preparation

    1. Check out or gather digital recording devices for student use.
    2. Make copies of the handouts for the lesson:

      • Receiver 
of 
Memory 
Interview 
Questions

      • Transcribing
 an 
Oral 
History

      • Pod
 Casting

      • Digital 
Recording

      • The
 Interview
 Copy 
of 
Published
 Memoir


      • Permission 
to 
Post
      • 



    Introductory Activities

    Published
 memoirs
 to
 read.
 

    SESSION ONE:
    1. Discuss with students the significance of stories in history. Explain that stories are one way to gain wisdom and insight. Stories can be told in many different ways: acted out on stage, in film, or on television, sung in a musical or an opera, written in a favorite book, or told orally. Few of us realize the richness of our own family history that can be extracted from those of our older relatives yet living. Ask students if they have ever told stories around the dinner table at family holidays. Hold class discussion about family stories and traditions. Explain that for many cultures, oral tradition is a way of linking the past to the future.
    2. Tell students they will be completing a family oral history in which they will be conducting family interviews. Inform students that they will be starting with their own memoir and oral history.
    3. Read a few short memoirs (list provided). Or this could be used as a culminating project after reading the novel, The Giver or Night, both of which emphasize the importance and wisdom of transferring memories from generation to generation. 


    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS:

one 
piece 
blank 
paper,
 writing
 utensil,
 computer 
with
 word
 processing
 


    SESSION
TWO:

    Personal 
Memoir/
Oral 
History:

    1. Tell students they will first be creating a personal memoir. Have students engage in personal story map exercise with folded paper creating 6 quadrants. Each quadrant is to represent a particular time span ( 5 years). Have students write down two important events that took place during that time period in their lives as well as one emotion. It works best to keep each sentence to three or four words. Provide example from own life. Possible events may be:
      • First day of school (e.g., preschool, kindergarten, first grade, middle school, high school) A special family trip or vacation
      • A family event or milestone (birth of a sibling, first car)
      • A personal achievement (e.g., first place in a competition)
      • A personal loss (parents’ divorce) Discuss with students that upon completion of their personal history map they now have an outline for their memoir.
    2. Have students read their personal history maps and see if any event jumps out at them or enlists a particularly strong emotion. They may wish to expand further on that specific event. Or have students go back and write at least two sentences for each event while considering the 5 W’s (Who, What, Where, Why, When). Distribute the Memoir Rubric. Have students rewrite their memoir including an introduction using the Rubric as a guide.

    SESSION
THREE:

    MATERIALS:
 
 Handouts
‐
Memoir
 Rubric,
The
 Interview,
Permission
 to 
Post, 
Electronic 
Publishing

 Digital 
Recording
 Device
 The 
Interview:
    1. Distribute The Interview handout. Explain and discuss each criterion for a successful interview. Have student look over the interview questions provided and choose at least 15 they would like to ask their oldest living relative. Discuss the use of the digital recorder or some other digital audio recording device (mp3 player, ipod, etc.) Inform students they will be conducting an interview with a relative at least a generation older than themselves, transcribing the interview and posting it electronically. Distribute a Permission to Post slip. Assign the interview to be completed by two following class periods.
    2. Using digital recording device have students create an audio of their personal memoir.


    SESSION
FOUR:
    
Transcription/
Interview
 Essay:

    1. After students have conducted their interview. Distribute the Transcribing an Oral History handout. Review with class. Have students start working on their transcriptions.

    2. Distribute the Electronic Publishing handout. Have students upload their audio of their personal memoir along with the audio of their interviewee.
    3. 
Have students upload a picture of themselves and their interviewee or some type of visual representation.


    Culminating Activity

    SESSION FIVE:
    Evaluate using Memoir Rubric, Interview Essay Rubric or Oral History Rubric. Compile 
class
 memoirs 
into 
a 
community
 mosaic 
project 
and
 publish 
to 
internet, 
school 
or 
local 
museum
 webpage.


 


    Cross-Curricular Activity

    History

    What are the origins of a favorite family artifact, food, or tradition? When was this item first introduced in the United States? If originated in the United States, when was it introduced to other regions of the world? What cultural, ethnic or religious significance does this item have in the United States or in other regions of the world? Prepare an illustrated report based on your findings. Include a map that identifies the origins of this item.
    Health

    
Take one family recipe and determine its nutritional value based on an average single serving size (including amount of calories, sodium, sugar, fats and carbohydrates). Investigate and experiment with ingredients that might improve the recipe’s health benefits. Prepare a new recipe based on your findings and address how and why it might be a tasty substitution for the health- conscious. Record an elderly relative reading his/her favorite recipe. Post electronically as a Family Recipe Book
    Science

    
How have advancements in DNA testing affected the way an individual perceives his or her identity, family history and/or cultural history? Investigate the current understanding of DNA testing (how it works, its degree of accuracy and its purposes). Then read the accounts of individuals who have used it to uncover their pasts. Write a reflection paper that addresses your own feelings about what you might hope or expect to find in DNA tests.
    Technology

    
 
Prepare a “How-It-Works” poster of one of the pieces of equipment that were thought to be “state of the art” from a relative that is at least a generation older than yourself. Post electronically to school web page.
    Fine
Arts

    1. Design a coat of arms for your family that incorporates elements of your family history. Consult resources that offer explanations of crest symbols such as:
    2. Create a memoir presented as a photographic collage, a painting, or a sculpture. Accompany your work with an artist’s journal explaining why you have chosen the particular method of presentation and analyze your own successes and shortcomings.
    3. Create a movie poster representing your family memoirs. Be sure to include a major slogan, 
 
 the cast of characters and short characterizations for each cast member.




    English/Language 
Arts 
Extension





    1. Write a fairy tale or myth using your family oral histories. How might you make your characters fantastical, magical and/or inspirational?
    2. Using your personal story map (step 1: session 2) create a Life Poem. Then read, record and post it electronically. (This could create a class-wide Life Poem project).

    Community Connections

    Compile class memoirs into a community mosaic project and publish to internet, school, or local museum webpage.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Once Upon a Native Myth

    Written By: Melinda Crimmins
    Grade Level: 8 - 12

    Time Allotment

    3 - 6 Fifty Minute Class Periods

    Overview

    Students will research regional Native American folklore, create a storyboard using pictures or symbols and relate the story orally to the class. The class will vote on the two best oral stories. The “winners” will receive a prize. The teacher may videotape the performances and show to the class. Another option would be to post the video on the school, or class, webpage.
    Supplemental Material -
    Lesson Plan
    Guide to Quality Story Telling
    Evaluation Form
    Story Summary Sheet
    World on the Turtles Back

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts: American Literature; Native American Folklore & Oral Story Telling

    Learning Objectives

    Students will develop an understanding of the themes in American literature, recognize the link between literature and history by analyzing literature according to various genres, and differentiate among forms such as journals, essays, and stories.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Selected clips that support this lesson plan:
    Native American Myths & Stories:
    American Folklore
    Native American Lore
    Living Myths
    Oral Story Tellers:
    Grandma Coyote tells a Creation Story
    Native American Story ~ The Three Deer Sisters
    Native American Storyteller - Tales of Wonder
    Grandmother Spider Brings The Sun To Earth

    Materials

    Computers with internet access Guide to Quality Story Telling Handout Oral Story Evaluation Form Native Myth: The World on the Turtles Back Story Summary Sheet Digital Story Telling Handout (optional) Poster board/ markers Video Recorder (optional)

    Teacher Preparation

    Access computers with internet Make copies of Quality Oral Story Telling Handout Make copies of Native American Oral Story Evaluation Sheet Make copies of Story Summary Guide Gather poster board and markers

    Introductory Activities

    MATERIALS: Native Myth: The World on the Turtles Back, Computers with internet access, Guide to Quality Story Telling

    1. Ask students to define or give examples of: Fairy Tales, Folk Tales, Legends, Tall Tales, Fables, and Myths.
      • Fairy tales have magic characters such as witches and fairy godmothers, as well as human or animal characters. The solution to the problem is usually reached through magical means.
      • Folk tales are stories that originated from the common people and are often associated with a specific country or people. The characters are often stereotypes of ordinary people and extraordinary things often happen to them.
      • Legends have some basis in historical fact, which may have been distorted or exaggerated as they have been told over the years.
      • Tall tales involve characters that are larger than life. They may be based on actual people or events, but they are exaggerated so much as to make them seem impossible.
      • Fables are short stories with a moral lesson. They often feature animals that act like people.
      • Myths are made up to try to explain why things are as they are in nature, customs, and institutions..
    2. Ask students what stories they may know. Some examples they may suggest are; Goldie Locks and the Three Bears, The Tortoise and the Hare, Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox, Johnny Appleseed, The Easter Bunny. Discuss how the Native American culture has many stories classified as myths and folklore.


    3. Have students read the Iroquois story The World on the Turtles Back (p.24-32 Unit 1: Part 1 McDougall Little) or distribute the handout.


    4. Guide the discussion. “What might be the cultural significance of the folk story? What function does it fulfill for a society, particularly as a creation story? How are folk stories conveyors of cultural values?”


    5. Ask students how they know the myth, legend, etc they named earlier? Did they know these stories/legends before they could read? Ask “ If the stories were not written down how else would these stories be passed from generation to generation?


    6. Talk about the tradition of oral storytelling. “The tradition of oral storytelling has been a part of human heritage and culture throughout history. It was in existence long before the written word. The oral story has a unique social role is as a vehicle for passing on long-standing beliefs and customs. It has been used to spread news, teach lessons, relate historical events and explain natural wonders and phenomena in an entertaining way.” Tell studnets that story telling has been used to preserve and celebrate the history of the people. “Today, storytelling is still an integral part of cultures and groups throughout the world. It is an important tool in linking the past with the present.“


    7. Ask students what would make an oral story memorable or interesting?


    8. Show video clips of a Native American oral story tellers.
    9. Grandma Coyote tells a Creation Story Native American Story ~ The Three Deer Sisters

    10. Ask the students if they liked the clips and why?


    11. Ask students to listen for expression as you show them another video clip.

    12. Native American Storyteller

    13. Ask students if they noticed any difference between the video clips they just watched? Which did they like better? Why? View another video clip.
    14. Grandmother Spider Brings The Sun To Earth
      Other videos if needed:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bBeUdL-NkO8
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCCLAi3zguY&feature=related
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ejp8wn_rnlA&feature=related

    15. Distribute and review handout Quality Oral Story Telling.


    16. Tell students they will be researching regional Native American folklore, creating a storyboard using pictures or symbols and retelling the story orally to the class. The class will vote on the best oral story telling and the “winners” will receive a prize.
    17. Learning Activities

      MATERIALS: Story Summary guide, computer with internet access, poster board, markers, Story Evaluation sheet
      1. Distribute Story Summary Guide with links to Native American Myths and Folk Lore. Students will use the internet to research and locate Native American folklore, myth or creation story - preferably regional.
      2. Students will complete a Story Summary Guide. After completing the guide they will ‘block out’ the stories in storyboard format. This will help in memorizing the story. First - block in key words or phrases in sequentially. The simplest blocking format is to divide a piece of paper into four or six quadrants. Then, divide the major events of the story into four or six sections. This will assist the students’ memorization of the story. Next the students create symbols, or simple drawings, to represent each quadrant. They use no words or written phrases.
      3. In groups, students practice their stories with each other, using their storyboard or poster to assist them. Students progress to telling their chosen story without the poster.
      4. Distribute the handout Oral Story Evaluation.

      Culminating Activity

      MATERIALS: Completed story board, poster, Video Camera (optional)
      1. Students will tell the stories to the class. Using the rubric as a guide, the class will vote on the two most enjoyable, or best, stories. Prizes will be given to those students.
      2. Time saving alternative: Have students tell stories to groups and then have each group decide on the best story to present to the class. If you have access to a video camera, tape the students telling their stories. This is a good way to refine the telling of a tale, particularly the movements and gestures.
      3. When students are telling the story/tale in a "performance" setting, do not interrupt the teller. Keep notes for each teller. Go over them with the entire class after the teller is finished, so that all learn from your comments. You may also go over the notes with each teller individually.

      Cross-Curricular Activity

      ART
      • Analyze stories for use of strong imagery and visual details.
      • Use stories to develop themes.
      • Use stories that create patterns or rhythms. Translate them into visual patterns.
      • Use stories to motivate and stimulate creativity.

      HISTORY
      • Use stories that are based on historical events.
      • Analyze details of stories that show cause and effect.
      • Use biographical stories.

      GEOGRAPHY/ SOCIAL STUDIES
      • Tell or listen to stories that show the way of life, customs, and beliefs of an area or ethnic group.
      • Incorporate stories into the curriculum that explain the why and how of the earth's formation.
      • Use stories that have geographical details in the setting.
      • When studying West African or Jamaican cultures, listen to Anansi stories. Then discuss how these stories reflect the cultural identity of the people.

      LITERATURE
      • Use stories to enhance and reinforce vocabulary development.
      • Tell or listen to stories that provide examples of how literary elements are used effectively.
      • Use stories to motivate and stimulate interest in reading and writing.

      MATH
      • When teaching how to solve word problems, turn arithmetic equations into stories.
      • Look for stories that include problem solving, inference, sequencing, and patterns.
      • Use stories that make comparisons and show cause and effect.

      MUSIC
      • Choreograph stories.
      • Compose songs to go with the stories.
      • Compose music to tell the story.

      SCIENCE
      • In a unit on scientific theory, look for ‘how’ and ‘why’ stories such as Why Raven's Feathers Are Black and How The Leopard Got Its Spots.
      • In a unit on the rain forests, look at stories from or about the indigenous people of Brazil.
      • To teach analyzing skills, use stories that show cause and effect or that make comparisons.

      COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS Students could interview residents at local Indian reservations about oral traditions.
      • Students could post their story boards in local businesses with a short description of the project or story they depicted.
      • Students could perform their oral stories for the community.
      • Students could post a video of themselves giving the performance on line.
      For more ideas on community-based projects, go to the Making Family and Community Connections site at http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/month9.
      STUDENT MATERIALS
      • Computers with internet access.
      • Quality Oral Story Telling Handout
      • Native American Oral Story Evaluation Sheet
      • Story Summary guide
      • Poster board
      • Markers

      Materials of Interest:
      60 minute PBS Video: Anishinaabe-Niimi ‘Idiwin: Ojibwe Powwow. Includes footage of powwows at Red Lake, Leech Lake, and Ball Club along with performances by the Eyabay Singers from Red Lake with lead singer Lee Lussier, Jr.

      SmithsonianVideos — January 25, 2010 — Winter Story Telling Festival: Thirza Defoe(Oneida/Ojibwe) and Gene Tagaban (Tlingit/Cherokee) These videos demonstrate how to tell stories not only with words, but with music, song, dance, and film as well.

      Audio & transcripts: http://www.turtleislandstorytellers.net/ Turtle Island Storytellers Network is an online network promoting tribal storytellers, historians, and song carriers from 13 states. This network is funded by the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail, the National Park Service, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

      Audio, transcripts, biographies: http://www.pbs.org/circleofstories/voices/index.html

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Place We Call Home

    Written By: Debra L. Knutson
    Grade Level: 8th

    Time Allotment

    Twenty Class Periods, One Day Long Field Trip

    Overview

    “The Place We Call Home” is an interdisciplinary unit in which students study various aspects of northwest Minnesota through different lenses. The focus of the art lesson will be to capture aspects of Buffalo River State Park using digital photography. The graphic below illustrates how the lessons of the different classes intersect and dovetail. The project culminated with a field trip to MSUM’s Regional Science Center on May 27, 2010. Each student’s final product was a photograph and a haiku poem that demonstrated his/her understanding of some aspect of the change this place has experienced.

    Lesson Plan -
    Buffalo River State Park Lesson Plan
    Supplemental -
    Powerpoint
    Field Trip Worksheet

    Subject Matter

    Digital Photography/Landscapes & Nature

    Learning Objectives

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Students will:
    • Understand the changes that have occurred throughout the history of photography.
    • Learn the basic principles of photography: subject, time, and light.
    • Be familiar with vocabulary relating to the subject of photography.
    • *Be familiar with photographer Ansel Adams.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in the operation and use of digital cameras.
    • Be able to use composition, lighting, and angles to capture an image that reflects change in the natural setting of the park.
    • Edit and prepare their photograph for public display.
    • Write a haiku poem that demonstrates a deeper understanding and greater appreciation of the landscape found within Buffalo River State Park.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Materials

    Keynote slideshow on camera parts Keynote slideshow on history of photography Old cameras and photographs Digital cameras for student use Computers and color printer Photography paper, mat board for photographs STUDENT MATERIALS: Students may choose to use their own camera on the day of the field trip.

    Teacher Preparation

    Review websites for content. Become familiar with the use and operation of the cameras you will be using. Assemble necessary supplies such as cameras and schedule computer lab time.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Introduce students to short video on photography found on Brain Pop: Arts & Music/Concepts/Photography
    2. ‘Show & Tell’ time looking at old cameras and photographs.
    3. Discuss changes in taking and processing photos.
    4. Visit websites and gather information regarding the various ways photography is used, such as photojournalism, commercial, etc.

    Learning Activities

    Students take short quiz on photography found at the end of the Brain Pop video. This establishes what the students know before we begin our unit of study. Daily photography assignments based on subjects of the teachers choice.

    Culminating Activity

    Field Trip to Buffalo River State Park Photography exhibits of student art in the community Online gallery of student photos

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Language Arts: Lessons on point of view/perspective. Writing the final haiku poem for project.
    Math: Lessons on the velocity and discharge of the Buffalo River.
    Social Studies: Unit on history of the Red River Valley.
    Science: Lesson on using GPS. Perspectives on geologic history of the RRV.

    Community Connections

    Guest speakers: Guest speaker on Glacial Lake Agassiz and the Red River Valley Guest speaker on flora and fauna of Red River Valley and environments Photography exhibits within the community along with student written reflections. made.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: All in the Family, Which family do you want to join?

    Written By: Heather Oppegard
    Grade Level: 3-5

    Time Allotment

    5-6 30 minute class periods, recommended to cover one instrument family per week or teach this plan over a long period of time.

    Overview

    Students will explore musical instruments and instrument families by learning how they are played, how sound is produced, what characterizes each instrument family (what the instruments in each family have in common), and then share preferences of which instrument they would choose to play if given the opportunity.

    Lesson Plan - All_In_The_Family.pdf

    Subject Matter

    Music, can adapt to include some history and science.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to name the musical instrument families, label or sort various instruments into their families, recall what each family member has in common, explain how each produces sound, and evaluate which instrument they can relate to or would like to play given the opportunity.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    Minnesota Legacy Musical Concepts

    Materials

    Computer, projector, copies of instrument sort and survey (1 per student), signs: brass, percussion, woodwinds and strings. Make a playlist or have available segments of different instruments playing. Many music series will have such an option on the series CD’s. Option: index cards, four per student.

    Teacher Preparation

    bookmark site, preview videos, copy sort and survey sheets. Make instrument signs and gather music for listening or make a playlist.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Let’s brainstorm! How many musical instruments can you name? (List answers on the board.)
    2. Now lets talk about families. A member of each family in real life has some things in common. Can you name some things that you and your family members have in common? (possible answers: similar hair/eye color, same last name, live together, etc.) Do you think that any of the instruments we listed have anything in common that make them family? How are they related? Can we categorize them into different families? What factors can we look at to help us decide how to group them? (what each instrument is made of, how sound is produced, etc.)
    3. Let’s get into groups and see if we can sort this list into four families: brass, strings, woodwinds and percussion. Keep sheet for revising as more information is learned.
    4. Have students answer the beginning survey question.

    Learning Activities

    1. With their sorting list and survey sheet in hand,students watch musical concepts videos on screen using computer and projector.
    2. Students can fill out and/or revise while viewing videos. Watch videos in desired order and as class time allows over the span of a few class periods.
    3. Summarize and discuss what was learned at end of each class session.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Fill out final questions on survey sheet.
    2. Share and discuss final preferences and reasons.
    3. Play activity: Four corners Make four signs: Brass, Woodwinds, Strings, Percussion and place a sign in each corner of the room. Play some sample audio versions of different instruments of the orchestra playing. Have students move to the corner with the family label of the instrument they are hearing. Another way to show their learning would be for the students to label four index cards with the instrument family names. When they hear the particular instrument, they hold up the family name card for the teacher to observe.
    4. Play computer games on an interactive white board as a group or kids can pair off to play games in a lab setting. Music Quizzes Choose any from the list “Quizzes-Instruments”.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    History: learn the history and origins of different instruments, ex: hunting horns-French horn, flutes carved from wood, etc. some of which is covered in the videos. Science: learn in more detail how the sound is produced in various instruments. Create a string instrument using a box and rubber bands. Fill a container with rice for a shaker. Tape wax paper to one end of a paper tube to make a kazoo. Beat on various containers for drums. Blow in rubber tubing and a funnel for a horn.

    Community Connections

    Invite musicians to demonstrate instruments. Attend a concert.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Lewis and Clark: Same Place, Different Perspectives G 6

    Written By: Scott Klimek
    Grade Level: Grade 6

    Time Allotment

    One hour

    Overview

    In this lesson, students will write about several encounters between the expedition and various Native American groups from the viewpoint of an expedition member or one of the Indians. Students can see a large-format film titled, Lewis and Clark: Great Journey West before or after the lesson.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
    • Compare how encounters during the expedition may have been viewed by the expedition and by Native American groups; and
    • Understand that peoples' perceptions of places and of other people are based on their own culture and experience.

    Materials

    • Computer with Internet access
    • Photocopies of a five-page student handout, Expedition Encounters
    • Photocopies of the map "Lewis and Clark Expedition Routes and Control of Lands"
    • Photocopies of the map "Lewis and Clark Expedition: Westward Route, Native Americans, and Forts"
    • "Jefferson's Instructions to Lewis"

    Teacher Preparation

    Geographic Skills:
    • Asking Geographic Questions
    • Acquiring Geographic Information
    • Organizing Geographic Information
    • Answering Geographic Questions
    • Analyzing Geographic Information

    Introductory Activities

    Opening:
    1. How do students describe the physical and human characteristics of their town or city? How would their parents describe their hometown? How would visitors? Compare these answers to show that people can think about or describe a place in different ways.

    2. Have students imagine they are part of the Lewis and Clark expedition, looking at an expansive, seemingly endless sea of prairie grass. How might they think about the following: "expedition," "the West," "wilderness," "uncharted territory"? How might someone from a Native American tribe have described those things?

    Learning Activities

    Development:
    1. Make two photocopies of the five-page handout, Expedition Encounters, and divide the class into five teams. Give each team two copies of one of the encounters (each team should have a different encounter).

    2. Each encounter describes a situation and the place where it occurred. Journal entries describe the point of view of expedition members. (Explain that the apparent misspellings are the result of the way that Lewis and Clark spelled certain words when writing in the journals.) Because Native American history passed from generation to generation through storytellers, tell students they will need to use the information given to imagine what a Native American might have thought.

    3. Divide each team into two groups. Have one group focus on the encounter from a Native American perspective; the other group from the perspective of someone in the expedition. Students can refer to a map during their discussions, either "Lewis and Clark Expedition Routes and Control of Lands" or "Lewis and Clark Expedition: Westward Route, Native Americans, and Forts."

    4. After the small-group discussions, have each student write about the encounter from "their" point of view. (Remind students that people in the same group can have different perspectives.) Students should use descriptive language and describe geographic factors that may have affected the encounter.

    Culminating Activity

    Closing:

    Have representatives from each team read aloud descriptions of their event. How do the perceptions of the events and places differ? Why might they differ?

    Suggested Student Assessment:

    Ask students to write about something that happened during the expedition as they imagine Sacagawea or York (Clark's African-American slave) might have perceived it.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Extending the Lesson:
    • What similar things might Native American tribes and the expedition have wanted? (Common needs or wants would have contributed to the success of the expedition.)
    • Have students work individually or in pairs to develop a "dialogue" poem (in which alternating lines of dialogue are written from two different perspectives) that describes an event or place.
    • Investigate Native American inter-tribal activities. How did tribes communicate and trade with each other? How and why did their opinions about Lewis and Clark vary?
    • Examine photos showing various cultures. Describe how a child, an adult, a traveler, or a business executive might interpret or view each culture.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Tooth Titans in Training G PreK - K

    Written By: Alyssa Enger
    Grade Level: Pre-Kindergarten — Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    4 days

  • 30-45 minutes for day 1 and 2
  • Time to make posters on day 3 and time to share with another class on day 4
  • Overview

    After completing this series of lessons, students will be able to identify the different types of teeth in the human mouth and identify their purposes. They will also be able to demonstrate, explain, and promote good oral hygiene.

    Lesson Plan - Tooth_Titans_in_Training.doc

    Subject Matter

    Health, Language Arts, Science, Art,

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
  • Observe the different kinds of teeth in the human mouth.
  • Examine how the shape of each type of tooth allows it to perform a different function.
  • Understand the importance of taking care of their teeth.
  • Learn and demonstrate proper tooth brushing techniques to help reduce health risks.
  • Be able to share their knowledge of good oral hygiene.
  • Learn new words and expand vocabulary.
  • Use oral language to describe objects and experiences.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • Teeth Time
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/55cde83e-0453-4d62-9c1f-8a846a661f02/55cde83e-0453-4d62-9c1f-8a846a661f02/
    Source: Sid the Science Kid from the episode “A Brush with Teeth” You can either stream this video or download it for later use.
    In this one minute and thirty-two second video the children get to explore the different types of teeth in their mouth and how different types of teeth help them eat different types of food.
  • Dentist http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/96a64918-6c3e-49b6-a19e-d95330f46b5c/96a64918-6c3e-49b6-a19e-d95330f46b5c/
    Source: KidVision VPK
    http://kidvisionvpk.org/home.cfm
    You can either stream this video or download it for later use.
    In this eight minute and thirteen second video the children will get a tour of a dentist office and watch two girls get a check-up. They also learn valuable vocabulary and get a feel for a real dentist check-up. This video can be broken up into as many segments as you wish.
  • Healthy Teeth, Healthy You
    http://www.ket.org/education/video/kyhea/kyhea_000002.htm
    Source: Kentucky Educational Television website.
    This video is only available for live stream.
    In this one minute and ten second video children are shown proper tooth brushing techniques and learn the importance of brushing your teeth long enough.
  • Materials

  • Digital camera
  • Smart board
  • Computer
  • Mirrors ( 1 per student)
  • Food with various textures
  • Plates
  • Writing utensils
  • Science journals ( 1 per student)
  • Dramatic play center objects
  • Toothbrushes ( 2 per student)
  • Toothpaste
  • Model of mouth
  • Music
  • Poster board
  • Various art materials
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Find another teacher in your building or district that would be willing to let your students present and share the information they will be learning with their class.
    2. Make science journals for each of your students for them to draw their observations in from day one.
    3. Collect the materials.
    4. Put together your dramatic play center that will resemble a dentist office.
    5. Buy food with various textures for day 2.
    6. Secure or order a model of the human mouth. One can be ordered at
      http://www.amazon.com/Anatomical-Chart-Company-TH01-Toothbrush/dp/B0009VLV4Y/ref=pd_sim_sbs_indust_3
    7. Download or bookmark all digital media

    Introductory Activities

    Materials:
  • Mirrors for students
  • Computer
  • Video


    1. To get students thinking about their teeth provide mirrors for the students to observe their teeth. Encourage them to look at the front and back teeth. Do they notice any similarities or differences?
    2. Tell the students that today you have a video about teeth and how they are different. Have them listen for one tooth name (canine, incisors, molars) and identify its “job”.
    3. Show the video called “Teeth Time”.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1

    Materials:
  • Various types of food with different textures
  • Plates
  • Journals
  • Writing utensils
  • Mirrors

    1. After watching the “Teeth Time” video ask students what they noticed about the different kinds of teeth. Ask them to identify one type of tooth and its job.
    2. Provide multiple types of foods with different textures for the students to try eating. As they try each one discuss which teeth they are using and if it is easy or hard to chew that type of food with those teeth. Ask where do you bite this particular food? What teeth are you using? Children may use their mirrors to “watch” as they eat if they so choose.
    3. Provide pre-made “journals” for students to draw their observations from the experiment. Encourage them to draw each of the food they tried and what teeth they used just like Sid did. Talk about how all the foods with the same textures can be sorted together and how they all use the same type of teeth.
    Day 2

    Materials:
  • Video
  • Various objects to create a dentist office

    1. Ask students if they have ever been to a dentist before. Ask questions like — What did you do there? Who did you meet? What kinds of instruments did the dentist use?
    2. Tell the students that you are going to show them a video about some children who go on a field trip to a dentist office.
    3. Show the video called “Dentist”.
    4. Stop the video at the 46 second marker and ask someone to share the three reasons we need teeth.
    5. Stop the video at the 4 minute marker to ask the students to help you name some of the instruments the dentist used.
    6. Stop the video at the 5 minute marker to ask how many baby teeth we have.
    7. Stop the video at the 5 minute and 50 second marker to ask what pictures of your teeth are called.
    8. Once the video is over generate discussion about the visit to the dentist the children just saw. What are some things that were new to them? What was the most amazing thing they saw?
    9. Dramatic Play:
      Set up your dramatic play center as a dentist office and allow the children to act out the various jobs within a dentist office and some of the things they saw during the video earlier in the day. Encourage them to talk about healthy habits and use vocabulary such as: receptionist, dentist, dental assistant, instruments, tooth brush, dental mirror, check-up, molar, incisor, canine, x-rays, and exam.
    Day 3 & 4

    Materials:
  • Video
  • New toothbrushes
  • Toothpaste
  • Model of mouth
  • Music to play

    1. Ask the students how many of them brush their teeth every day. Ask them to tell you the steps they use to brush their teeth.
    2. Write down the steps as they share them. Be sure to stop them and help them tell the steps in a sequential manner.
    3. Tell them that you have a short video to show them about how to brush their teeth. Show the video called “Healthy Teeth, Healthy You”.
    4. Once the video is over, pass out a new toothbrush to each child and tell them that they are going to practice brushing their teeth in the correct way. Tell them that you are going to set a timer for the correct amount of time. You can play music in the background so this time doesn’t seem quite so long to these little ones! ☺
    5. Observe students as they brush and model correct brushing for them using a model of a mouth and toothbrush. These can be purchased at many places. Here is a link to one that can be purchased through
      Amazon.com
      http://www.amazon.com/Anatomical-Chart-Company-TH01-Toothbrush/dp/B0009VLV4Y/ref=pd_sim_sbs_indust_3

    Culminating Activity

    Materials:
  • Poster board
  • Various art materials
  • Writing utensils
  • Toothbrushes
  • Participation from another class
  • Digital camera


    1. Have students draw a poster that shows their understanding of all the things that have been taught about teeth and their proper care. This poster can include how their teeth work (which teeth do what function as they eat) and/or how they can properly care for their teeth.
    2. Set up a time for the students to share these posters with another class in your school.
    3. Give each student an extra toothbrush to give away to someone in the other class that they shared their poster with.
    4. Take pictures of each of your students with their “partners” from the other class.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Reading

    Books that pertain to this lesson:
    1. My Dentist, My Friend by P.K. Hallinan
    2. Arthur’s Tooth by Marc Brown
    3. Just Going to the Dentist by Mercer Mayer


    Writing

    Materials:
  • Paper
  • Writing utensils

  • Students can either write about or dictate the proper steps to brushing their teeth. They can also draw picture to help others understand how to properly take care of their teeth.

    Math:

    Materials:
  • Tally sheet for families
  • Letter for parents explaining the project
  • Graph paper
  • Writing utensils

  • Have students and parents tally how many times the students brush their teeth at home in one week. Use this data to make a graph showing how many times students brushed their teeth at various times of the day.

    Science:

    Materials:
  • 3 cups
  • Cola
  • Vinegar
  • Water
  • 3 hard-boiled eggs
  • Magnifying glasses

  • Place a hard-boiled egg in a cup of cola. Set another hard-boiled egg in a cup of vinegar, and a third hard-boiled egg in water. Let the eggs soak for one week and then examine the shells. Show children how the cola has stained the shell and how the vinegar has dissolved the calcium. Point out that teeth are like the eggshells. Discuss how this shows the importance of brushing their teeth.

    Music:

    Draw a large picture of a mouth with teeth and all children to take turns coloring in the teeth to show how teeth get dirty when we eat. Finally, use an eraser to clean away the food as you sing:
    “This is the way we clean our teeth, clean our teeth, clean our teeth.
    This is the way we clean our teeth with our toothbrush every day!”

    Community Connections

    Have a local dentist or dental assistant come visit your classroom and talk about their job and the importance of dental health

    Take your own field trip to a dentist office.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Writing materials
  • A smile to show off those pearly whites of course!
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Amazing Rainforest G 3

    Written By: Kristi Howe
    Grade Level: Grade 3

    Time Allotment

    Approximately 1-15 class periods, 45 minutes in length (as determined by teacher)

    Overview

    Students will learn about tropical rainforests by participating in a multi-disciplinary thematic unit.

    Lesson Plan - The_Amazing_Rainforest.doc

    Subject Matter

    Science, Social Studies, Reading, Math, Art, Language Arts

    Learning Objectives

    Students will understand what a rainforest is and why rainforests are important to our environment. They will be able to identify the 3 layers of the rainforest. They will learn about rainforest plant and animal life. They will know where the rainforests are located on a map of the world. They will learn about what foods, spices, products, etc. we use in our everyday lives that come from the rainforest. They will be engaged in multiple writing assignments and art projects related to the rainforest. They will turn their classroom into the rainforest.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • Amazon Rain Forest Video:
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/tdc02.sci.life.oate.rainforest/amazon-rainforest/
  • Indoor Waterfall Video:
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/bb09.res.vid.rainforest2/indoor-waterfall/
  • Plant Habitats Around the World (video segment #8-rainforest):
    http://app.discoveryeducation.com
  • The Magic School Bus: In The Rainforest Video:
    http://app.discoveryeducation.com
  • Materials

  • Rainforest: The Latest Information and Hands-on Activities to Explore Animals, Plants, and Geography By Robin Bernard
  • The Great Kapok Tree By Lynne Cherry
  • The Umbrella By Jan Brett
  • Over in the Rainforest By Connie and Peter Roop
  • Rain, Rain, Rainforest By Brenda Z. Guiberson
  • A Day in the Life of Flippidy Frog By Betty Preston
  • Pebble Books Rainforest Animal Series By Helen Frost Titles in this series include: Boa Constrictors, Gorillas, Jaguars, Parrots, Tarantulas, Tree Frogs
  • How to Draw Animals of the Rainforest By Justin Lee
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Art supplies
  • Poster board
  • Teacher Preparation

    Get supplies ready for all activities, bookmark videos and websites or use power point presentation, collect books to be used.

    Introductory Activities

    KWL Chart-Ask students what they know about rainforests, what they would like to know, and I finish with the last step (what they have learned) at the end of the unit. This is done as a whole class activity using the smartboard.

    Learning Activities

    This is a multi-disciplinary thematic unit that involves many learning activites/lessons throughout an approximately 3 week session. The students will learn about the rainforest and turn their classroom into a model of the rainforest.

    Culminating Activity

    Invite parents, family members, and friends into our classroom to see the transformation that has taken place in our classroom. Students will be the teachers telling their family all they have learned about the rainforest by showing their poetry, letters, art work, graphs, etc.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Variety of learning activities included that encompasses all disciplines.

    Community Connections

    Inviting family members into the classroom as culminating activity.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Variety of materials needed dependent on lesson/activity
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Art supplies
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Separate, but Certainly NOT Equal G 8

    Written By: Nancy Wiebusch
    Grade Level: Grade 8

    Time Allotment

    One 45 minute period (Introduction only to reading an autobiographical excerpt of Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored by Clifton Taulbert)

    Overview

    This lesson is designed to introduce or reintroduce students to actions that took place in the United States regarding the “Jim Crow” laws, thereby generating questions, discussion, and building prior knowledge before reading an autobiographical excerpt of Once Upon a Time When We Were Colored by Clifton Taulbert.

    Lesson Plan -Separate,_but_Certainly_NOT_Equal.doc

    Subject Matter

  • Origin of the “Jim Crow” laws
  • The 14th Amendment
  • Civil Rights Movement
  • Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to
  • Identify key component of the 14th Amendment
  • Understand the subsequent creation of “Jim Crow” laws
  • Recognize “Jim Crow” rules created by the white majority
  • Have a greater understanding and deeper appreciation of the adversities and road blocks black Americans encountered during that time period
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://kidblog.org
  • http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/vtl07.la.ws.style.fouramenI/the-fourteenth-amendment-part-i/
  • http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/vtl07.la.ws.style.fouramenII/the-fourteenth-amendment-part-ii/
  • Materials

    Jim Crow Signs
    1. Rest Rooms
      http://nicolaus.com/mn/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/jimcrow1.jpg
    2. Water Fountains
      http://www.eastcountymagazine.org/sites/eastcountymagazine.org/files/JimCrowWaterFountains.jpg
    3. Laundry
      http://www.abhmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/WeWashForWhitePeople.jpg
    4. Passengers
      http://www.solcomhouse.com/images/JimCrow.jpg

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Above Hyperlinks
    2. Video cues:
      1. The 14th Amendment—Part I
        1. Watch for
          1. “language” and “broader interpretation”
          2. Implicit?
          3. Explicit?
      2. The 14th Amendment—Part II
        1. Watch for:
          1. 1875 Civil Rights Act
          2. Public Places
          3. Full and Equal Access Without Regards to Race
          4. Supreme court changes
      3. Jim Crow
        1. Watch for:
          1. Symbolisms
          2. Key word “apartheid”

    Introductory Activities

  • Pass out sticky note to each student.
  • Ask each student to write on sticky note what they KNOW about the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Ask each student to write on sticky note what they THINK they know to be true about the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Ask each student to write on sticky note questions they have regarding the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Ask students to pair/share with shoulder partners what they KNOW.
  • Share and discuss as a class.
  • Ask students to pair/share with shoulder partners what they THINK they know.
  • Share and discuss as a class.
  • Ask students to pair/share with shoulder partners questions they have and discuss those questions with shoulder partners.
  • Generate class discussion regarding questions students have generated.
  • Show The 14th Amendment—Part I video.
  • Ask students to share/discuss video cues.
  • Show The 14th Amendment—Part II video.
  • Ask students to share/discuss video cues.
  • Ask students what they think Jim Crow laws looked like during that time period.
  • Show students Jim Crow signs displayed during the 1950s and 1960s.
  • Ask students to pair/share what Jim Crow laws may have had to do with the subsequent Civil Rights Movement.
  • Learning Activities

    This entire lesson is designed to create prior knowledge before reading a short autobiographical excerpt in which the author experienced the Jim Crow laws.

    Culminating Activity

  • Ask students if these types of discriminatory practices exist today.
  • Homework assignment: Students will be required to find a newspaper/Internet article regarding some form of discrimination.
  • Students will share what they have found.
  • In small groups, students will create collages from the articles they have found.
  • Collages will be displayed in the team’s common area.
  • Cross-Curricular Activity

  • American History
  • Tolerance
  • Discrimination
  • Prejudice
  • Community Connections

    Upon completion of the autobiography, in class, students will create a blog by which they will share their thoughts and findings regarding discrimination and prejudice that exists today.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    Students will be asked to independently search for articles regarding discrimination and prejudice in today’s world.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Science: It's Magic! G 3-4

    Written By: Melonie Weidler
    Grade Level: Grades 3-4

    Time Allotment

    3 DAYS (approximately 30-45 minutes each day)

    Overview

    Students will learn about the metamorphosis of the Monarch butterfly. They will learn to identify the four stages of its metamorphosis. They will map the path across the US and into Mexico that the Monarch takes during migration.

    Lesson Plan - Science-_Its_Magic!.docx

    Subject Matter

    Science, Visual arts, Language arts, Social Studies

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to identify the four stages of butterfly metamorphosis. Students will learn about Monarch migration and be able to show on a map the primary paths they travel. Student will create a poster persuading others to preserve and protect the monarch butterfly.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.goodtricks.net/quicktricks.html (website of magic tricks)
  • http://www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/monarch/jr/LifeCycle2.html (website containing the slideshow of the stages of a butterfly metamorphosis
  • http://www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/monarch/sl/37/A00.html (website containing slideshow of monarch migration)
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqDwvuleRYc (this is a video showing the migration and wintering home of the monarch)
  • http://www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_spring2013.html (this is a map that shows the migration route of the monarch butterfly)
  • http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/nalargez.htm (this is a map that you can print for your students so that they can draw the migration route of the Monarch butterfly)
  • Materials

  • Electronic equipment– projector, computer
  • Other suppies – white copy paper(enough for each student to have one piece)
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • Paints
  • Brushes
  • Pencils (students will need to have there own pencil, but the rest can be shared)
  • Copies of the US and Mexico Map (each student needs their own copy)
  • Poster Paper (one for each student)
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Practice your magic trick
    2. Gather paper supplies and art materials
    3. Run off map and note taking page – enough for each student
    4. Put videos on desktop for easy access

    Introductory Activities

    Materials:
  • 1 dollar bill
  • 2 jumbo paper clips


  • Day 1
    To begin this lesson, I would start by doing a simple magic trick. I selected a simple one on
    http://www.goodtricks.net/quicktricks.html. The trick involves linking two paper clips by using a dollar bill and two jumbo paper clips. This website gives the directions on how to perform the trick, and it also has several others to choose from.

    After the magic trick, I would explain that nature can do magic too There are several animals and insects that can change into other animals or insects by a process called metamorphosis.

    Learning Activities

    Materials:
  • Teacher(computer, projector)
  • Students(pencil
  • Crayons
  • Document Organize Your Thoughts
  • Map of US and Mexico)


  • Day 1
    1. Students will fold a piece of white copy paper into fourths and number the boxes form one to four.
    2. Students will view a slide show of the stages of the butterfly
      (www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/monarch/jr/LifeCycle2.html) and draw and label the four stages of a monarch butterflies life cycle.


    Materials:
  • Teacher (computer, projector)
  • Students (white copy paper, pencils)

  • Day 2
    1. Students will view a slide show of the explaining the migration of a monarch butterfly.
      (www.learner.org/jnorth/tm/monarch/sl/37/A00.html)
    2. Watch video on the wintering area of the monarch butterfly in Mexico.
      (www.youtube.com/watch?v=uqDwvuleRYc)
      During the video, students will take notes on what they see on a page titled Organize Your Thoughts, found at the end of this lesson.
    3. Have students partner share their Organize Your Thoughts sheets. Discuss as a class after that.
    4. Students will be given a blank map of the United States and Mexico. Using a map of butterfly migration (www.learner.org/jnorth/maps/monarch_spring2013.html), they will color the areas that the monarch butterfly stays during the winter months and draw arrows to represent spring migration. Map can be found at (www.worldatlas.com/webimage/countrys/nalargez.htm)

    Culminating Activity

    Materials:
  • Poster paper
  • Pencils
  • Markers
  • Paint

  • Day 3
    1. Students will create persuasive “Save the butterfly posters” listing ways that everyone can help in preserving the monarch butterfly.
    2. Poster Criteria:
      • Colorful
      • Easy to read
      • Persuasive
      • Ideas are relayed clearly

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Students could research the area in Mexico where the Monarch butterfly winters.

    Community Connections

    COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS:
    Students could write letters explaining their concerns about declining butterfly populations to the ND representatives and senators, and give some of their suggestions.

    ADDITIONS:
    I would also suggest gathering samples of milkweed and bring live caterpillars for the students to see.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Native American Exploration Unit G 6

    Written By: Dana Moffett
    Grade Level: Grade 6

    Time Allotment

    5 to 7 - 48 minute class periods

    Overview

    This is a unit designed to go along with the 6th grade Minnesota history Northern Lights curriculum. Through the use of ten cross-curricular learning stations, students will explore many parts of the Native American culture, specifically focusing on the first Minnesotans: the Dakota and the Ojibwe.

    Lesson Plans - Native_American_Exploration_Lesson_by_Dana_Moffett.doc
    Unit Resources - Native_American_Exploration_Unit_Resources.docx
    Unit Rubric - Native_American_Exploration_Unit_Rubric.docx

    Subject Matter

    Social Studies (also math, language arts, art, music, world languages, dance)

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to use historical thinking skills in order to understand Minnesota’s past.
    1. I can discuss how the oral traditions and artifacts of early Minnesotans (Dakota, Ojibwe) can help us understand their cultures.
    2. I can use evidence from the text to support my answers, draw inferences, and determine main ideas.


    Students will describe the experiences and interactions between Minnesota’s first peoples and how their cultures changed upon the interactions of arriving Europeans.
    1. I can describe the traditions of the Dakota before the Europeans arrived in Minnesota.
    2. 2. I can describe the traditions of the Ojibwe before the Europeans arrived in Minnesota.
    3. I can compare and contrast the Dakota and Ojibwe tribes before 1800.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • “Native American Exploration Unit” Prezi presentation (created by me), access at:
    http://prezi.com/rilhcqy47ru1/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy
  • “Maple Syrup” video clip on pbslearningmedia.com (3:47)
  • “Native-American Folktales” video on Learn360 (4 stories, total of 22:58)
  • Wild Rice Harvest information from Manoomin website:
    http://www.manoomin.com/Harvesting.html
    This website offers information about Ojibwe wild rice.
  • “Introduction: Beautiful Resistance” video on Learn360 (4:36)
  • “Pow-Wow: Native American Celebration” video on Learn360 (from 1:00 to 6:25 mark)
  • “The Dreamcatchers” video on pbslearningmedia.com (3:12)
  • Dakota words website:
    http://www.native-languages.org/dakota_words.htm#pictures
    This website offers a Dakota picture dictionary.
  • Ojibwe words website:
    http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe_words.htm#pictures
    This website offers an Ojibwe picture dictionary.
  • Materials

  • 10 file folders, if desired (can laminate), to create station folders to hold supplies
  • 2 hula hoops
  • Post-it notes or index cards – approximately 100-150 per class of 25
  • “Dakota or Ojibwe?” instruction sheet – 1 for the station
  • Computers with internet access – minimum 6 for stations, one per student for final glogging activity
  • “Sweet as Syrup” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • “Wild Rice Harvest Steps” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • Native American folktale picture books from school library – 5 or more
  • “Elements of Folktales” graphic organizer sheets – 1 per student
  • “By the Numbers” worksheets – 1 per student
  • “Artistic Freedom at a Boarding School?!” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • “Pow-Wow: Native American Celebration” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • “Dreamcatchers” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • For Dreamcatchers: a paper plate for each student, 2-3 hole punches, 2-3 scissors, also variety of yarn, beads, feathers
  • “Learn the Language” recording sheets – 1 per student
  • “Native American Funsheet #1” – 1 per student
  • “Native American Funsheet #2” – 1 per student
  • “Native American Funsheet #3” – 1 per student
  • “Native American Exploration Unit Rubric” sheets – 1 per student
  • Teacher Preparation

    Stations can be created by putting supplies for each station in a file folder or by just placing the recording sheets and other necessary materials around the room in designated areas. See individual station descriptions, below, for necessary prep. Bookmark necessary websites, as listed, make copies, and get SMARTboard ready to show introductory Prezi presentation: access at:
    http://prezi.com/rilhcqy47ru1/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy

    Introductory Activities

    Show the “Native American Exploration Unit” Prezi presentation (access at:
    http://prezi.com/rilhcqy47ru1/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy ) to students to introduce them to the overall process. Discuss the rubric and how scores will be calculated.

    Go through directions for rotating through stations by not running, taking turns, waiting for stations to become available, and to stay focused. Show students where each station is located and briefly read through directions.

    Learning Activities

    1. Students will move around the room and choose which of the following ten Native American learning stations they would like to complete in order to earn the grade of their choosing.
    2. Some stations are required while others are optional. Students will use a rubric to determine their final score: stations are worth varying amounts of points, so final scores are dependent upon which optional stations are completed.
    3. The ten Native American stations are listed below:
      1. “Dakota or Ojibwe?” station (social studies): Students will use their textbooks to compare and contrast the Dakota and Ojibwe tribes. Students should write each similarity or difference on a post-it or index card and place it in the corresponding place in a Venn diagram created by using 2 overlapping hula hoops.
      2. “Sweet as Syrup” station (social studies): Students will watch the video clip entitled, “Maple Syrup” on pbslearningmedia.com (3:47) and answer questions on corresponding recording sheet. Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers.
      3. “Wild Rice Harvest” station (social studies): Students will review the steps in the wild rice harvest by reading the information at the website http://www.manoomin.com/Harvesting.html They will then draw the steps of the wild rice harvest on the “Wild Rice Harvest Steps” recording sheet. Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers.
      4. “Native American Folktales” station (language arts)*: Students will choose a Native American folktale to read and summarize the story using the “Elements of Folktales” graphic organizer sheet. *Special Needs Modification (or could be used by all students if enough computers are available): Have students watch one of the 4 segments of the “Native-American Folktales” video on Learn360.
      5. “By the Numbers” station (math): Students will complete the worksheet regarding which states have the highest populations of Native Americans. Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers.
      6. “Artistic Freedom at a Boarding School?!” station (social studies, art): Students will watch the video clip “Introduction: Beautiful Resistance” on Learn360 (4:36). While watching they will complete the “Artistic Freedom at a Boarding School?!” recording sheet. Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers.
      7. “Pow-Wow: Native American Celebration” station (social studies, dance, music): Students will watch the video on Learn360.com entitled “Pow-Wow: Native American Celebration” (from the 1:00 mark to the 6:25 mark only. While watching they will complete the “Pow-Wow: Native American Celebration” recording sheet. Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers.
      8. “Dreamcatcher” station (social studies, art): Students will watch the video “The Dreamcatchers” on pbslearningmedia.com (3:12). Students will use an answer key in the back of the station folder to self-check their answers. Then they will use the simple instructions and basic art supplies to create their own dreamcatcher.
      9. “Learn the Language” station (world languages): Students will visit the websites http://www.native-languages.org/dakota_words.htm#pictures and http://www.native-languages.org/ojibwe_words.htm#pictures to explore some Dakota and Ojibwe words. They will record and illustrate 3 words from each language in each of 3 categories (animals, body parts, and color words) in a table.
      10. Independent stations (social studies): Students will complete the additional “Native American Fun Sheets.” These might be worked on at times when they are waiting for their partner/groups to finish up a station.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Students will make a glog at edu.glogster.com that demonstrates the knowledge they learned from the stations.
      Note: This website requires the teacher to set up a class and is not free. If a free option is desired, students could create a Prezi presentation, Google presentation, PowerPoint, etc.
    2. Guide students through logging into edu.glogster.com and explain that a “glog” is like an online poster that includes text, pictures, videos, etc. They will have a login code to use so the teacher can access the finished glogs.
    3. Tell students to make a glog using any of the knowledge they learned about Native Americans from the stations they completed. Guide them through the basic process and let them work.
    4. Have students share their glogs with the class.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    * See specific content areas addressed listed behind each station name above

    Community Connections

    As an extension activity, students may interview local Native American families or share glogs with members of the community.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Northern Lights textbook
  • Pencil
  • Other teacher provided materials, as listed above under “Materials”
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: I’m a Star G 6-8

    Written By: Jon Lucht
    Grade Level: Grades 6-8

    Time Allotment

    3-45 minute class periods

    Overview

    Students will become more aware of the effects of mass-media music by writing an original song, learning the structure, process, and cause and effect of the lyrics. They will then learn how songs are marketed.

    Lesson Plan - Im_a_Star.doc

    Subject Matter

    music composition, poetry/prose, business/marketing

    Learning Objectives

    Students will learn the art of composition, recognize the value messages presented by music lyrics, and learn the choices made in producing media messages.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    YouTube, MTV/VH1, Songlyrics.com, musicthinktank.com, rollingstone.com

    Materials

    1. Staff paper/pencils (several for each student)
    2. Alternative would be Finale Notepad (MakeMusic.com) music writing program for Mac/Windows
    3. Video camera(s)
    4. Music magazines (Spin, Rolling Stone, etc)
    5. Optional software program “Band-in-a-box” for music styles. (pgmusic.com)
    6. Worksheets
      1. (1) songwriting activities
      2. (2) performance preparations
      3. (3) song producing

    Teacher Preparation

    Survey students regarding favorite artists, prescreen appropriate Youtube video links, recorded music videos, staff paper/Finale Notepad, video/song rating/assessment forms

    Introductory Activities

    1. You and a friend have decided to write an original song and perform it at a local talent show. List the decisions that must be made in composing and performing a song (example: lyrics, target audience, performance apparel/dress, technology used, overall desired sound, purpose behind this activity decision). Analyze current music videos, songs, and music literature to see what interests you. Explore music lyric and music marketing websites.
    2. Introduce the lexicon of songwriting; Lyrics (words of a song), verse (storytelling part of a song), chorus (repeated phrase that is the main theme of the song), hook (memorable tune or beat or lyric that catches the audiences’ attention), transition (what is between the lyrics and the chorus)

    Learning Activities

    1. Students write their own music lyrics. Using a songwriting guideline worksheet, start the process by deciding on a topic for your song. Start with the first verse. Create two sentences, first by deciding on how long each sentence approximately will be, and then decide on a rhyme sceme.
    2. Write a chorus. Remember this is the musical highlight of the song, the part that the audience will remember most. Try to put in your “hook” that will most likely be related to the title.
    3. Write a transition, something that will connect the verses to the chorus.
    4. What is your value message in your song? What will people remember about what you are trying to say?
    5. Decide on the style you want your song to be (rock, metal, rap, blues, country, punk, reggae, pop, classical, Latin, Hip Hop, etc.) Trying singing it in several different styles.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Finalizing and printing of completed song.
    2. Performance of completed song using the aspects discussed in the Introductory Activity #1.
    3. Evaluate the effectiveness or the song, based on not only the aspects of composition (hook, lyrics, etc.), but on the performance criteria as well.
    4. Compare your song to another artist. See if you can discover an artist who:
      1. is involved in selling something other than music
      2. markets or promotes themselves in other media (TV, movies, etc)
      3. changed their look or sound to be more effective (eg. Hootie☺)
      4. used their songs in commercials
    5. Discuss how artists “brand” themselves, and how could you brand yourself and your new hit song.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    This could tie in very well with a business/marketing class, or music classes that deal with garage band performances or the recording process. It also fits in well with creative writing and poetry, as well as music performance classes.

    Community Connections

    In our community, one of the area colleges has a music industry major. Bringing in either students or professors from those particular classes at both the beginning and the end of this project would be invaluable in giving my student insight in to how the music industry really works. Perhaps even a tour of local recording studios or advertising agencies would be helpful.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: I Want To Talk About Me G 5-6

    Written By: Linette Kangas
    Grade Level: Grades 5-6

    Time Allotment

    Four 40 minute class periods

    Overview

    This unit introduces the students to having a positive attitude about themselves as unique individuals. The students will view a variety of styles of poetry. Students will create poetry and artwork. Students will present their poetry orally and share their self- portrait. The oral presentation will be videotaped and shared with parents and/or the community.

    Lesson Plan - I_Want_to_Talk_About_Me.docx

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts, Technology, and Guidance (Self Esteem)

    Learning Objectives

    The students will reflect about their present level of self-esteem. They will analyze their unique qualities. They will identify their personal strengths and assets and they will identify and express their feelings.

    The students will view other people presenting their poetry through media resources. Students will be given a format to write their personal poetry that will reflect who they are as a person. The students will have choices about the format of their poem that they will write. They will use their keyboarding and technology skills to complete the poetry.

    Students will create a self -portrait. This will benefit students who may not be confident poets, but very good artists.

    Upon completing this activity students will learn about themselves. They will use technology to create poetry. They will create art and gain confidence in their ability to speak and present in front of their peers.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.prairiepublic.org/television.minnesota-legacy-productions/just-friends
  • PBS “One Boy Told Me” by Naomi Shihab Nye
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/pe11.rla.genre.poetry.nyeoneboy/one-boy-told-me-by-naomi-shihab-nye/
  • http://www.poetrystation.org.uk/
  • http://www.favoritepoem.org/
  • http://www.pbs.org/newshour/poetry/
  • ettcweb.lr.k12.nj.us/forms/newpoem.htm‎
  • http://www.wordle.net
  • pbslearningmedia.org/resource/pe11.genre.poetry.dotybrian/brian-age7-by-mark-doty/
  • Materials

  • Computer/internet/active board
  • Computer lab
  • Printer
  • iPod for recording
  • Paper, colored pencils, crayons, etc.
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Preview videos
    2. Preview ettc. Web to become familiar with the different poetry formats
    3. Prepare questions about self esteem, person strengths, feelings and attitudes
    4. Make copies of self -portrait templates – one per student

    Introductory Activities

    1. Play Toby Kieth’s song “I Want To Talk About Me”. Ask the students to guess what the theme for the lesson is going to be for today. The students should pick up on the idea that they will be talking about themselves.
    2. Take time to have students work in small groups answering the question, “What is self esteem?” Other question should be, “What happens when someone has high self esteem? What happens when someone has low self esteem? How is self esteem related to your feelings? What are some of your strengths? How can we help to boost the self esteem of others?” (this would be on a handout).
    3. After small groups have met we will discuss and process these questions in large group.
    4. Tell the class that we are going to use the things we learned about self -esteem and our personal strengths to create poetry.

    Learning Activities

    1. Before showing the video ask the students to listen to whom the poetry is about and what that person is doing in the poem. Show the students the video of “Just Friends” from PBS television. The video I would show is called “Sleeping In”. Ask the students, “What do you think about having poetry set to jazz music? Did it make the poetry more interesting?” Have them answer the questions regarding whom the poem was about and what was happening in the poem.
    2. Continue to give more examples of people performing poetry. Tell the students that they are going to listen to poetry about things that a little boy said. Before showing the video I would ask them to listen for one line of the poem that they thought was funny and write it down after they hear the poem. I would show the video “One Boy Told Me” by Naomi Shihab Nye. This style of poetry is humorous. Following the viewing I would ask the children to share one line that they found particularly humorous. The teacher could ask the students, “How did this compare to the poetry we viewed previously?”
    3. I would pick a few other poems to show from either poetry station or favorite poems making sure to ask students to listen for specific information. The teacher should focus on the performances. Ask the students, “What do you need to remember when sharing your poetry with an audience?” (Appropriate responses would be to speak loudly and clearly, add feeling and emotion, and to not just look at the paper.)
    4. I would tell the students that our next activity would involve writing our own poetry. However, make sure to reassure them that they will have a format to follow. At this point the teacher will need to go online to the website: ettc.web. Show the students the five poetry options that they can choose from. Give the students the option to write “Lifes Lessons”, “All About Me Poem”, “BioPoem”, “I Am Poem”, or “Yes, That’s Me”. Show them the examples of each of these poems as well. Tell the students, “Tomorrow when we meet again, we will go to the computer lab and create our poems about ourselves. Each student would need to pick one poem to write about themselves. Are there any questions?”

    Culminating Activity

    1. Bring the students to the computer lab. Show the students how to get to ettc. Web. Remind the students about the five poetry options they have to choose from. They are: “Life’s Lessons”, “All About Me Poem”, “BioPoem”, “I Am Poem”, or “Yes, That’s Me”.
    2. The teacher will have to monitor the students as they work on their poetry. If a student is struggling the teacher may have to give the student some direction or one-on-one time.
    3. When the students have completed their poetry, make sure that they do a spell check and then print their poems. The teacher should take the copies of their poetry and make one copy for the student to keep and keep one copy in a file for them. Students may also save a copy on their computer file as well.
    4. When the class is drawing to a close, tell the students that they are going to watch a video called, “Brian Age 7” (pbslearningmedia.org/resource/pell.genre.poetry.dotybrian/brian-age7-by-mark-doty/). Ask the students to listen carefully to the poem. As they listen they should picture in their mind what Brian’s portrait looks like. After they have watched the poetry video ask the students to describe what Brian’s picture looked like. Have students draw it on the active board. Tell the students, “Tomorrow we will be working on artwork to add to our self esteem project. We will draw our own self-portraits tomorrow. Be prepared with your colored pencils or crayons for tomorrow’s class.“

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. The next day the teacher will provide copies of the blank portrait for the students. Templates can be found at kiboomukidscrafts.com. The teacher will take the blank head and shoulders and demonstrate how to add personal features to it. The teacher could use themselves as an example by drawing in their hair, eyes, nose, mouth making sure that it resembles them. The teacher would ask students to gather their supplies of either colored pencils or crayons. Before handing out the blank portrait template, the teacher would ask, “Does anyone have any questions about how to complete the portrait?”
    2. When students have completed their self portraits, the teacher should direct the students to get their personal poetry out and rehearse how they are going to present their poetry. (The teacher may choose to allow the students to add background music to their poetry. The teacher would have to make sure that the students choose school appropriate music.) The students would be gaining an understanding of self- esteem. In addition, they would learn how to create poetry and art specifically about themselves.
    3. The teacher should tell the students that poetry presentations would be any presented the next day to the class. The teacher would ask again if there are any questions.
    4. The final day of the projects, the students would present their poetry. The teacher should tell the students that they will be recorded on the I pad and this would be available for parents to view at parent teacher’s conferences. The teacher should remind the class they need to be a good audience. The students would be expected to listen appropriately and clap at then end of each performance. Students would also show their self -portrait prior to the reading.
    5. If the counselor does this project, they may want to collaborate with the teacher for grading or for the entire project. (The counselor does not generally give grades to students.)

    Community Connections

    1. The teacher/counselor would display the students’ self-portraits and run the video of the poetry performances on a continuous loop on a computer outside the classroom.
    2. Students could give poetry performances at a PTO meeting or before a music concert.
    3. They could also perform for the younger children in the school.
    4. The students could host a poetry performance for the community prior to a football game.


    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    Students will need access to the computer lab. They will need crayons or colored pencils for the portrait. The teacher will provide a template for the self-portrait.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Getting to Know You Poetry G 4-6

    Written By: Julie Almquist
    Grade Level: Upper elementary (grades 4-6); special education resource room

    Time Allotment

    Two or three class periods of 30-45 minutes each

    Overview

    This lesson will introduce students to the poetry unit, and help them get to know each other better, by listening to and reading a variety of poems. The students will also write a poem about themselves using Wordle.net.

    Lesson Plan - Getting_to_Know_You_Poetry.doc

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts/Technology

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to use technology to learn more about poems/poetry. The students will write their own poems using technology. The student will actively listen to a variety of poems and participate in class discussions about the poems/poetry.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.wordle.net
  • http://www.poetry.org
  • White House Hosts Poetry Jam)Source: PBS Newshour
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/resource/77f20efb-95e4-40ba-b382-c69fe09f143c/77f20efb-95e4-40ba-b382-c69fe09f143c/
  • Materials

    1. Computer lab with internet access for all students.
    2. Active board to guide students to the correct websites.
    3. Poetry books.

    Teacher Preparation

    1. Bookmark websites listed above
    2. Reserve computer lab or laptops
    3. Gather a variety of poetry books/poems to share with the students
    4. A printed copy of poetry websites for each student

    Introductory Activities

    1. Ask students if like poetry. Ask students why they do or don’t like poetry.
    2. Ask students if they like music? Go around and ask kids what types.
    3. of music they like and why.
    4. Ask students if their parents like music? What types of music do their parents like?
    5. It should be a general agreement that most people like music. But, music is a very broad term. Some may like to play music, some listen to it, and some sing. The genre of music may be different; it may be country, classical, classic rock, modern rock, heavy metal, rap and so on.
    6. Just as “music” is a general term so is “poetry”. Explain to students that there are just as many time periods, and types and ways to enjoy poetry as there are ways to enjoy and appreciate music. They just need to find the type and way they can enjoy poetry.

    Learning Activities

    MATERIALS:
  • Books of poetry: Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein; Rainy Day Poems by James MacDonald
  • List of poetry websites for students to explore (1 for each student)


    1. Read two or three poems to students from the books the teacher has picked out. Discuss the poems. Ask students who liked the poems and who did not and why. Ask the students how the poems made them feel.
    2. As a group go to the website www.poetry.org and explore the site for information on poetry and examples of different types of poems.
    3. Give students some time to explore other poetry websites from the list that the teacher has provoded.

    Culminating Activity

    MATERIALS:
  • Computer and internet access for each student
  • Piece of paper and pencil for each student


    1. Gather students back together. As a group go to:
      www.wordle.net
      Show students a couple of examples of how it works.
    2. Have students explore/play with the program on their own while the teacher walks around to observe how they are doing.
    3. Gather students back together. Have each of them write down on a piece of paper their first, middle and last name, 3 adjectives that describes themselves, 3 activities or hobbies that they have and 3 important people in their lives.
    4. Have the students type that information into wordle, then have them create their own wordle poem art.
    5. Post the wordle poem art around the classroom and give students a chance to read each others.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    History:
    Students could research and write about a famous poet

    Art:
    Students could draw pictures of the wordle they created

    Technology:
    Students could publish their poems on wordle or another website.

    Community Connections

    COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS:
  • Students could invite their parents/family to a poetry reading.
  • Students could visit a preschool/daycare to help younger children enjoy poetry by reading to them or helping them write simple poems.


  • STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Paper and pencils
  • Printed copy of poetry websites
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Falling for the Four Seasons G Pre K - K

    Written By: Courtney Holden
    Grade Level: Grades Pre-Kindergarten — Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    45 min

    Introduction Activity: 5 Minutes
    Learning Activity: 15 Minutes
    Culminating Activity: 10 Minutes
    Cross-Curricular Activity: 15 Minutes

    Overview

    The children will be introduced to the idea that there are four seasons. Through discussion and the use of multi-media (PBS Learning Media Video and Interactive Games) the children will learn about the characteristics of each of the four seasons, changes they will see with each season, as well as how to appropriately dress for each season. At the end of this lesson the children will be told about when Fall officially starts according to the calendar and that it is now the season of fall, and therefore for the next few weeks they will learn all about fall.

    Lesson Plan - Falling_for_the_Four_Seasons.doc

    Subject Matter

    Science, Language, Art, Mathematics, and Social Studies

    Learning Objectives

    The Students will learn the attributes of the four seasons, characteristics of each, and what is appropriate to wear for each season. After they are familiar with the overview of all four seasons, the students will talk more about Fall in particular. They will learn when fall starts, and all of the characteristics of fall such as how animals prepare, what is harvested in the fall, how you dress in the fall, what the outdoors looks like during fall and what holidays are during the fall season. The students will then take a nature walk and use new vocabulary they have learned in respect to fall. They will also collect items that remind them of fall. After that activity has been completed they will take their collections and create a “Fall Collage” at the art table.

    Media Components - Video/Web

  • Video from PBS Learning Media about the Four Seasons
    http://www.ket.org/education/video/kevsc/kevsc_000016.htm
  • Activity from PBS Learning Media about What to Wear for the Four Seasons
    http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/dress.swf
  • Activity from PBS Learning Media about What Season it is based on an Outfit
    http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/Seasons.swf
  • Materials

  • Computer hooked up to a digital projector such as a Smart Board
  • Pointer Stick for the Smart Board
  • 1 Plastic Bag per child (see Culminating Activity)
  • 1 Piece of White Construction Paper per child (see Cross-Curricular Activity)
  • 1 Glue Bottler per child (see Cross-Curricular Activity)
  • Pencils so the children may write their name on their paper
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Have the computer on and have the Video of the Four Seasons pulled up and ready to go.
      1. http://www.ket.org/education/video/kevsc/kevsc_000016.htm
    2. Have each of the following websites in cue so they are ready when you need to use them after the video.
      1. http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/dress.swf
      2. http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/Seasons.swf
    3. Have plastic grocery/ shopping bags out, one for each child (you may write their name on it with a Sharpie if you prefer).
    4. Count out 1 piece of paper for each child .
    5. Have enough glue bottles so that each child may have one.
    6. Have 4 art trays set up at the art table with the paper and the glue.
    7. You will need to have a few pencils out so that the children may take turns writing their name on their paper.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Call up 5 students to the front of the classroom that all have similar clothing (for example they all have on shorts and a t-shirt or jeans and a t-shirt or pants and a long-sleeved shirt- they just all need to be the same somehow).
    2. Then ask the children who are still sitting what they notice the same about the kids at the front of the room. Take numerous answers. Then draw it back to what they are wearing.
    3. Ask the 5 kids at the front of the room to tell you how they decided what to wear this morning, take all answers. Then ask why they are not wearing gloves or a tank top. They should answer that it is too hot or too cold for those particular items. Talk about how the kids at the front of the room dressed appropriately for the weather.
    4. Let them sit down.

    Learning Activities

    Materials:
  • Smart Board hooked up to a computer (or Promethean Board or ect.)
  • Pointer sticks for the children to use for the interactive games


    1. Ask the children about the different kinds of weather they have seen. Take all answers. (Ex. Rainy, hot, cloudy, foggy, cold, and so on.) Create a list on the board if you wish.
    2. Then ask the kids what types of the listed weather words could be seen in summer versus what they see in fall / winter / spring.
    3. Tell them that summer, fall, winter, and spring are the four season of the year. Then tell them that each season looks and feels different.
    4. Turn on the Smart Board (the video is already cued), and have them watch the video about the four seasons. Ask them to pay special attention about what the people are wearing in each season discussed.
      http://www.ket.org/education/video/kevsc/kevsc_000016.htm
    5. Show the video.
    6. After the video ask the children what they saw the child wearing in spring, summer, fall, and winter, and then discuss why that outfit would be a good choice for each season.
    7. Bring up the first interactive game that is in cue about dressing the child based on the season, making sure that each child can have a turn.
      http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/dress.swf
    8. Then bring up the second game and have children guess what season it is based on the clothing provided.
      http://tdcms.ket.org/kevsc/int/Seasons.swf
    9. After you have completed that, ask the children if they know what season it is now (This lesson is to be done in the Fall) and brainstorm with the children what are characteristics of fall. Just make this a verbal list but draw special attention to new vocabulary words learned related to fall.
    10. After you have completed your list and you feel the children have a good grasp on what Fall is and what it looks like, you can continue with your Nature Walk Activity. (Culminating Activity)

    Culminating Activity

    Materials:
  • 1 plastic bag for each child
  • A piece of paper and a pencil for the teacher
  • Coats if the weather requires


    1. After Circle time has been done and the children have learned what the four seasons are and the characteristics of each season has been discussed. The children will be told that fall has begun and we are going to focus on that particular season.
    2. Each child will receive a small plastic bag.
    3. The class will go on a Nature Walk around the school or city block and search for signs of Fall.
    4. The children will tell what signs of fall they see to the teacher who will record them on a sheet of paper.
    5. Children are then encouraged to collect items they feel are signs of fall and place them in their plastic bag.
    6. Once the class has finished their Nature Walk, they should return to the classroom and continue with the Cross-Curricular Activity.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Materials:
  • 1 Piece of White Construction Paper per child (9’’ by 12’’)
  • 1 Glue Bottle per child (Glue Sticks will not work for this activity)
  • The bag of items that each child collected outside
  • A work tray for each child


    1. Have the children empty the contents of their bag onto their work tray.
    2. Then the children need to place their name on their paper and flip it over.
    3. They are to use the glue to attach their fall items that are spread out on their tray. The children do not need to use all of their items and can share the extras if they wish. This is their picture; they may put whatever they wish on their paper from their tray in whatever spot they wish.
    4. You are there to help facilitate vocabulary about the season of fall and talk about the changes they see happening in the season of fall.
    5. You could also incorporate some math by asking them if anything on their paper resembles any shapes they know, and count the items as well as talk about the colors they see.
    6. Display their collages for parents to see.

    Community Connections

    1. You could take a field trip to Sully’s Hill, ND (State Park) to observe signs of fall such as habits of the animals as well as the changing colors of the leaves and what is happening to the trees, ect.
    2. You could take a field trip to a local clothing store and have the children look at the clothing available and talk about what they would wear for fall.
    3. You could visit a local grocery store and talk about what fruits/vegetables have just been harvested during the season of fall.
    4. You could visit a local super center such as a Wal-mart or K-mart and look around their seasonal items and talk with the children about what they could use for fall, such as a rake, a leaf-blower, covers for flowers, air conditioning covers and so forth.
    5. The children could help clean/ rake up the leaves in the school yard.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Colonial School Experience G 5-8

    Written By: Kristi Heupel
    Grade Level: Grades 5-8

    Time Allotment

    2 weeks

    Overview

    The students will explore what it was like in schools during the colonial period to prepare for colonial day at school. The students will be preparing presentations to share with their classmates before the entire class participates in colonial day at school.

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts, Social Studies

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
  • Be able to research different areas pertaining to education in colonial America.
  • Be able to prepare a presentation with a group using Glogster to share with the class.
  • Prepare to participate in colonial day at school using the information they learned from the presentations.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    Glogster
    http://www.glogster.com
    edu.glogster.com

    Video Clips
    The First American Settlements. Sunburst Visual Media. 2004
    Learn360. 13 July 2013
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=150859


    Video Quiz
    The First American Settlement. Sunburst Visual Media. 2004
    Learn360. 13 July 2013
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=150858
    Comparing Life in Colonial America. Sunburst Visual Media. 2004
    Learn360. 13 July 2013
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=150860

    Websites
    "Colonial America (1492-1763)." Colonial America. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 July 2013.
    http://www.americaslibrary.gov/jb/colonial/jb_colonial_subj.html
    "Education in the 13 American Colonies." Education in the 13 American Colonies. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 July 2013.

    Materials

  • Access to the internet and Glogster
  • Library or classroom books for research
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. Create a sample Glog on Glogster to show the students your expectations.
    2. Download video clips to put on Glog.
    3. Gather any books you have on colonial America.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Introduce Glogster and the assignment by presenting your sample Glogster page.
    2. My Glogster page was a review of what the students had learned about colonial America.
    3. I first showed “The First American Settlements” video clip as an introductory activity and then had the students do the “Video Quiz” as a culminating activity and write their answers on a sheet of paper before the video clip gave the answers.
    4. I then showed “Comparing Life in Colonial America” and discussed as a class if we learned any new information about colonial America that we didn’t learn in our social studies chapters. I would periodically stop during the video to talk about this not just at the end.
    5. After that I showed the website “Colonial America (1492-1763)” and discussed how to skim and scan the information to find what I need for my Glog.

    Learning Activities

      Day 1 - 2
    1. The class will spend 1-2 days playing with Glogster to get acquainted with the website.


    2. Day 3
    3. Brainstorm as a class what information they want to learn about education in colonial America to prepare them for colonial day at school.
    4. Split the class into groups of 3 or 4.
    5. Each group will choose 2 or 3 ideas from the board or some of their own to research on the internet or in the books from the library.


    6. Day 4-6
    7. Research the ideas on the internet. The students are expected to include pictures, graphs, and information about education in colonial America. One picture that is required is the clothing the students wore to school to prepare them for later activities. Another area of research that is required is finding out how the different classes of people were educated (artisans, farmers, bankers, etc.). They will get extra points if they are able to find any video clips that are pertinent to the ideas they are researching. They are also to create a box on their Glog that compares education in today’s America with education in colonial America.

    Culminating Activity

    Present the Glog to the class as a group. They will graded on participation, information and creativity.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. The students will end this unit by participating in colonial day at school.
    2. The students are required to follow the rules like they were in colonial school and will be disciplined like them.
    3. They have to come in costume as part of their grade which they researched during their Glog presenations.
    4. The students will have lunch like colonial students. They will have to bring their lunch and eat it outside.
    5. All of the school assignments done will be cross-curricular because they will be learning geography as they do their math (measuring acres for the fields and what type of land to plant on) and doing science during language arts (writing about the land and soil). They will also be taught different trades (weaving, soap making, etc.).

    Community Connections

    The students could write letters or e-mails to local or national museums to get information regarding education in colonial America. They could also do face-to-face interviews with senior citizens to find out about how their education was different from the education the students are currently receiving.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    The only materials the students need are computers and books provided by the teacher.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Gimmie Shelter G 6

    Written By: Kathrina O’Connell
    Grade Level: Grade 6

    Time Allotment

    Eight or more, 20-minute class sessions
    Day 1 - shelter discussion/video clips
    Day 2 - kinds of shelters & project assignment
    Day 3 - independent group research & note-taking
    Day 4 - independent group research & note-taking
    Day 5 - presentation writing
    Day 6 - presentation practice
    Day 7 & 8 - oral presentations

    Overview

    Students will learn how to create an emergency winter shelter. Students will work in small groups to research specific winter shelter construction. Students will present their information to the class, but must also include a song, rap, or chant that will help classmates remember the construction procedures. Students will work cooperatively prior to and during the presentation, and will also be respectful listeners.

    Lesson Plan - Gimmie_Shelter_Lesson.docx
    Rubric 1 - Rubric_-_Winter_Shelters.xlsx
    Rubric 2 - Rubric-Winter_Shelters_Presentation.xlsx
    Powerpoint - Winter_Survival_Shelters.pptx

    Subject Matter

    Science - Scientific procedures, engineering
    Language Arts - Media research, cooperative discussions, oral presentations, listening

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to:
  • Interpret information from a variety of sources and make connections to their topic of winter shelters.
  • Present research findings logically, and in a clear and concise presentation, using appropriate eye contact, volume and pronunciation.
  • Identify the main ideas of text pertaining to winter shelters.
  • Follow a multi-step procedure for constructing a winter shelter.
  • Describe the impact a shelter has on the daily life of humans.
  • Design a winter shelter, and make adjustments as needed in order to build the warmest winter shelter.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=351882&SearchText=winter+survival
    -Video on Eskimo igloo construction, 1:52 min.
    Eskimos, clip from Sub Zero, series: Modern Marvels © 2005, A & E Television Networks
  • http://www.ndstudies.org/media/long_before_we_were_born_shelter
    -Video on Native American shelter construction, 3:36 min.
    Long Before We Were Born- Shelter, from “Long Before We Were Born” Regional Learning Project, University of Montana Center for Continuing Education 2009.
  • http:boyslife.org/outdoors/3473/taking-shelter/
    -Website used to provide pictures and descriptions of basic winter shelters. Boy Scouts’ magazine webpage.
  • A Mimio lesson is included for those that have an installed Mimio interactive wipe board device. If this service is not available, the regular Powerpoint should be used.
  • Grading rubrics may be found or created at http://rubistar.4teachers.org
  • Materials

  • At least one computer per group, with internet access. Preferably one computer per student.
  • Model-sized materials for presentation, brought from home (sticks, cotton, playdough, etc).
  • Rubrics; collaborative work skills, oral presentation, listening.
  • Student paper and pencils
  • Teacher Preparation

  • A Mimio lesson is included for those that have an installed Mimio interactive wipe board device. If this service is not available, the regular Powerpoint should be used. If using the Mimio to introduce some basic survival shelters; fallen tree, lean-to, A-frame, tarp, and quinzee, click on the various ‘buttons’ to engage the animations. Click again to make the animation buttons reappear. If using the Powerpoint, continue as normal. When using the Powerpoint, start in slideshow mode in order to activate the transitions and sound. For both Mimio and Powerpoint, click on the web addresses to view video/website.
  • The Eskimo video is located on Learn 360. Make sure that your school has access to this site before attempting to locate it.
  • The Native American video is located on the Prairie Public website.
  • Introductory Activities

    1. Slide 1- Introduce the lesson for the day; Winter Shelters.
    2. Slides 2 & 3- Read together the learning objectives and standards, so that students are aware of the expectations for the days’ lessons.
    3. Slide 4- Have a student read the cartoon caption.
    4. Slide 5- What would you do? Guide students in a discussion of winter survival. Quickly turn to slide 5.
    5. Slide 6- KWL Chart. Using the Mimio presentation or Powerpoint, the teacher will guide students in a discussion of winter survival and shelters. Students will be asked to share what they know about winter shelters using the KWL chart. Many students may have experience building shelters or may have watched survivor shows on the television. The introductory discussion is needed in order to identify students’ prior knowledge.
    If using the Mimio, students may write what they Know, Want to know, or want to Learn, directly on the wipe board (program). Otherwise, the Powerpoint may be shown and students can write on the board or bulletin board paper.
    Whatever program is used, encourage discussion amongst students and/or use small groups or pairs to share ideas.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. Slide 7- Eskimos and Igloos. Explain to students that they will be learning about one specific winter shelter, the igloo. Have students read the purpose for listening. Open the hyperlink and watch the one minute video clip. Pause the video when the narrator describes the materials used to build igloos. Students may be surprised to learn that Eskimos made shelters using materials other than just snow. When the video is finished, return student focus to the reason for listening. Ask students to share their answers. Discuss how shelters impacted the daily life of Eskimos both in the past and today. Moving on to other unique shelter constructions…
    2. Slide 8- Native American Shelters. Students will learn about Native American groups that built shelters on the mid-western prairie. Have students read the purpose for listening. Open the hyperlink and watch the three minute video clip. Pause the video at places where the speakers describe the different locations where shelters were built. Ask students to recall why they were so particular about shelter placement. When the video is finished, return student focus to the reason for listening. Ask students to share their answers. Discuss how shelters impacted daily life of Native Americans both in the past and today, and how shelter impacts our daily life today.
    Day 2
    1. Slide 9- Basic Winter Shelters. Open the hyperlink and view the Boy Scouts’ webpage on shelters. Observe each picture and have students read the descriptions. These shelter types will be researched in more detail, in small groups.
    2. Slide 10- Assignment- discuss the research assignment. Go over requirements and rubric.
    3. Slide 11- Oral presentation- discuss oral presentation. Go over requirements and rubric.
    4. Slide 12- Grading. Discuss grading and highlight the grade for listening (during oral presentations).
    5. Slide 13- Questions? Check for understanding. Make sure that all students know what is required for the three graded activities (research, presentation, listening).
    Day 3
    1. Independent group research & note-taking. Students will work in their small groups, researching their specific winter shelter, online. Students will need to record their sources/webpages and take notes on the important information gathered from their reading and video observations. Each person should record data on their own worksheet.
    Day 4
    1. Independent group research & note-taking. Students will work in their small groups, researching their specific winter shelter, online. Students will need to record their sources/webpages and take notes on the important information gathered from their reading and video observations. Each person should record data on their own worksheet.
    Day 5
    1. Presentation writing. Students will write out the ‘script’ to their presentation, making sure that everyone has a speaking part. Model construction should be clear and a song/rap/rhyme must be included.
    Day 6
    1. Presentation practice. Student groups will practice their presentation, making sure that they are using appropriate volume, pronunciation, and eye contact. They also need to practice the concise construction of their model, and their song/rap/rhyme.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Student groups will take turns presenting their reports on winter shelter construction. All presenters should be actively participating in the oral presentation, and all students should be actively listening.
    2. As required for this presentation, students must demonstrate how to construct their winter shelter, using model-sized props from home. Students will also use a song, rap, or rhyme to teach the construction procedures.
    3. With remaining time, revisit the KWL chart and fill in the What I Learned section of the chart. In addition, return to the objectives and standards slides and check with students to make sure that those goals were reached.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Art:
  • Students can create a 3-Dimensional art project using model-sized shelter materials.
  • First they will paint a watercolor background and ground.
  • Then students will construct a life-like miniature model of their shelter. Students should write the procedures for creating the shelter and place them on display at school.
  • Writing:
  • Students can use their shelter as an idea for a creative writing exercise.
  • Students can write a poem about the construction or use of the shelter, in winter conditions.
  • Science:
  • If the shelters are truly constructed outside (in a nature area, for example), students should make predictions and then test the temperatures inside and outside of the shelters.
  • Compare results to show which shelter maintained the warmest temperature.
  • Community Connections

  • Students may participate in MSUM Barlage Science Center’s “Why Not Winter?” program, where students learn how to orienteer in the woods, build a fire, and cook their lunch on the fire.
  • Students may also visit the Deep Portage Conservation Center, near Hackensack, MN, where students learn about; animal tracking, orienteering, shelter construction, fire building, and more.
  • STUDENT MATERIALS
  • Research worksheet (double sided)
  • Oral presentation checklist
  • Suggested website list
  • Rubrics
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Water For Life G PreK

    Written By: Karen Quibell
    Grade Level: PreKindergarten

    Time Allotment

    3 days, .5 hour period/day for direct lessons. Enrichment/Center activities throughout the week.

    Overview

    The theme explored is water. The lessons are broken up into 3 segments within, to teach the concepts of why we need water, the water cycle and water conservation. Science, literacy, language, writing, math and technology will be used to integrate short lessons to support the theme.

    Lesson Plan -Water_for_Life_Lesson.doc
    Chart - Living:Nonliving_Chart.pdf
    Template - water_to_live_class_book_template.doc
    Vocab Words - water_vocab_words.doc

    Subject Matter

    Science, math, literacy, health, language and music

    Learning Objectives

    The students will:
  • Understand the importance of water to sustain life
  • Understand the different states of water and how water changes
  • Learn how to care for water as an important natural resource
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=229029 Dehydration. Slim Goodbody. 2009
  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=229064 Kidneys and Drinking enough water. Slim Goodbody. 2009
  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=679136 Learn to Sign the Word Water. Two Little Hands Productions. 2009
  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=129233 Wonder World of Science: Where Does the Rain Go After it Falls? Phoenix Learning Group, Inc.. 1987
  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355815 Feature Book. Reading Rainbow. 2004
  • http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=678955 Water Conservation Song (clip from the video H-2-Oh-No!) Planet Bonehead Studios. 2010
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akp-JjYwPz0 Carrying Water for a village in Africa. June 26th 2011.
  • http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/content/deb2c5ef-de02-44a0-bc8d-8a6cf6f8eced/ Air and Water: Water. EekoWorld. 2007
  • http://www.ndstudies.org/media/long_before_we_were_born_water Long Before We Were Born contains stories by tribal members from North Dakota to the northwest Pacific coast of specific topics related to their traditional ways of life before contact with Europeans as compared to the present. 2009
  • Materials

    Day 1:
  • One class chart to list Living/Non-Living things
  • One paper for each child to write and illustrate class book (template)
  • Books: "Living and Non-Living" by Carol K. Lindeen
  • "What's Alive" by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld
  • "I am Water" by Jean Marzollo
  • Pencils for each student
  • Color crayons for each student
  • 2 small plants


  • Day 2:
  • Ice cubes
  • Container of water
  • Clear container with a cover
  • Wet sponge
  • Vocabulary word cards
  • Books: "Drippy the Raindrop" by Joel Kimball
  • "Bear Loves Water" by Ellen Weiss
  • Filled water table with float/sink items:(wood, corks, rocks, sponge, feathers, leaves etc.)


  • Day 3:
  • 2 gallon jugs filled with water
  • Books: "Our Earth Home: An Earth Poem" by Linda Glaser
  • "Why Should I save water?" by Jen Green
  • Filled water table
  • Large empty container
  • Small empty container
  • Medium size empty container
  • Teacher Preparation

    Day 1:
    1. Hang up chart of Living/Non-Living Things.
    2. Bring up videos: "Dehydration", "Kidneys" and "Learn to Sign Water" on computer.
    3. Have papers for class book ready to hand out to each student.
    4. Have the 2 plants ready.
    5. Have books available from materials list.


    Day 2:
    1. Fill up water table.
    2. have float/sink materials available.
    3. have ice, water, sponge and clear container with cover ready.
    4. have cotton balls for each student ready.
    5. shallow pan of cold water for each table.
    6. bring up the video "Where Does the Rain go after it Falls?"
    7. Have water vocabulary word cards ready.
    8. Have books available from materials list.


    Day 3:
    1. Get YouTube video "Carrying Water" ready.
    2. Fill up 2 gallon jugs of water.
    3. Have a wall mural shaped like an Earth cut out and drawn on blue butcher paper.
    4. Get the video "Water Conservation Song" ready.
    5. Markers for drawing on mural.
    6. Fill water table, have the 3 sized containers ready.
    7. Have Books available from materials list.

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1:
    1. Start a class discussion asking the children what our bodies need to live. Brainstorm a list of things our bodies need. Ask what do you think we need the most of all.
    2. Watch the videos: "Dehydration" and "Kidneys" follow up with a discussion about how important water is for our bodies. Ask the question: "What else needs water to live?"


    Day 2:
    1. Discuss the word cards, ask for meanings.
    2. Tell the children to listen for the words during the video.


    Day 3:
    1. Ask: "How do we get water?" Talk about how we are lucky that when we turn on our faucet, we get clean water. Discuss how that is not so for everyone in the world.
    2. Show the You tube video of carrying water in an African village.
    3. After watching the video, discuss how it is often a child's job to carry water for their family.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1:
    1. Introduce the concepts of "Living" and "Non-living."
    2. As a class, brainstorm and list on the chart.
    3. Pass out the papers to make a class book. Children will fill in the blank and illustrate. (A___________ needs water to live.)
    4. Read book as a class when finished.


    Day 2:
    1. Watch the video, "Where Does the Rain go After it Falls?"
    2. Show the children the ice, water and the clear covered jar with wet sponge inside. Talk about the different states of water. Go back to the word cards and discuss what is happening in each container.


    Day 3:
    1. Show the children the gallon jugs of water. Talk about how you waste this much water when you leave the water running while brushing your teeth.
    2. Have the children take turns carrying the jugs of water down the hall. Ask the questions: "Do you think it would be hard to carry them farther?" "Could you do this more than once a day?" Show the children the relationship between how much water we waste, and how some people have to carry that much water a long distance because they don't have clean water nearby. Talk about how to take care of the Earth by conserving our water use.

    Culminating Activity

    Day 1:
    1. Watch, "Learn to Sign the word Water."
    2. Practice signing throughout the day.
    3. Show the children the plants and tell them that we will be observing them for the next few week to see what happens when we water one but not the other. Ask for predictions.


    Day 2:
    1. Give each child a cotton ball to hold. Tell them to pretend that they are holding a cloud.
    2. Ask them how the cloud feels; heavy or light, soft or hard.
    3. Instruct the children to place the "cloud" gently over the cold water. Explain that water that has evaporated has traveled up to the cloud and it is a lot colder up in the sky, so the vapor turns into water and it is filling up the cloud. Ask: "Can you see the cloud filling up with water?"
    4. Ask the children to gently pick up the cloud from the pan. Ask the children how the cloud feels now. Light or heavy, Warm or cold? What is happening with the water? Observe that the water is dripping from the cloud. Why? The cloud cannot hold all that water and is too heavy. What do we call it when water falls from the clouds? Yes, rain. Your cloud is raining. Ask, what is happening to the water? Observe that it is going right back into the pan. Talk about the pan as being a stream, lake, river or the ocean.
    5. Children can take turns using the water table to "sink and float" items provided.


    Day 3:
    1. Play the video, "Water Conservation Song." Encourage the children to sing along.
    2. Discuss how they can make a difference in helping our Earth.
    3. Have the children dictate to you how they can help the Earth by saving water. Write their answers on the earth wall mural.
    4. Hang the mural in the hall.
    5. Invite children to take turns at the water table. They will predict how many times they have to fill the small container to fill the large container. They count as they fill and check their prediction. Repeat with the medium size container.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

  • Math-prediction, counting, comparing sizes, weights.
  • Social studies-learning about how water affects different cultures.
  • Science-different states of water, observation, living and non-living things.
  • Early Literacy-signing the word "water," word dictation and beginning writing, illustrating.
  • Language-water vocabulary words, rhyming words (song)
  • Community Connections

  • Field trip to community gardens (ex. NDSU greenhouses)
  • Water treatment facility
  • Nearby river or pond to observe water life (ex. Buffalo River Sate Park)


  • STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Printed vocabulary word cards
  • Living/Non-living chart
  • Class book template
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Sound, Music or Noise G 4

    Written By: Nancy Condit
    Grade Level: Grade 4

    Time Allotment

    1-2, 50 minute class periods

    Overview

    This lesson will introduce:
    1. Musical concepts of sound, music and pitch
    2. Development of music from singing to the addition of instruments
    3. Discuss the history of music in different culture, comparing the Native American flute players of the prairie, and Oboe player in the symphony

    Subject Matter

    Subject matter will address the areas including; a discussion of how sound is created, the difference between noise and music, an introduction to the early history of music, singing and musical instruments, and listening to examples of singing and musical instruments from different cultures.

    Learning Objectives

    Students will be able to:
  • Explain how sound is made.
  • Explain the difference between music and noise.
  • Explain that music can be created by a person with or without an instrument.
  • Explain what an instrument is.
  • Give examples of how singing music and playing musical instruments are used in different cultures to create music.
  • Create a tool for making a musical sound.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

  • http://www.ndstudies.org/media/prairie_artists_keith_bear_morning_star_whisper
  • http://www.ndstudies.org/media/musical_concepts_oboe
  • http://www.ehow.com/how_7704540_make-instrument-sound-science-project.html
  • Materials

  • Drinking straws
  • Scissors
  • Ruler
  • Teacher Preparation

  • Bookmark website for resources if necessary
  • Gather supplies
  • Make samples of instrument
  • Prepare questions to be answered during the video – samples included with attachment
  • Introductory Activities

    Attention getter – When you are out on the playground playing and everyone is laughing, shouting, and talking to each other, would your teacher think you were making noise or music? (noise)

    Music is said to be organized sound, while noise is unorganized sound. Music is made up of sound that has a specific set of pitches and rhythmic patterns. Noise is usually many sounds happening at the same time without any particular order.

    Whisper to your neighbor and come up with as many places you can think of that people make noise. (Cheering at a basketball game). After 2 minutes I want each set of partners to tell me one of their ideas without repeating what is already been said, we will make a list on the board. (Brainstorm, Put up two headings - noise, music)

    Now how many of you remember the alphabet song you learned in kindergarten or 1st grade? Let’s sing it together. (A B C D etc.) What kind of sound are you making now? (Singing or making music). Even this simple song you learned long ago has a basic pattern of rhythm and pitches. When rhythm and pitch form a specific pattern it is music.

    Once again for two minutes in a whisper visit with your neighbor and list all the places, we hear music. (Brainstorm and list on the board under music). i.e. church.

    Music is all around us. You just made a list of places and thing that give us music. We hear music on TV, computer games, iPods and phones. We hear music in stores or dentist offices etc. or anywhere you may have to wait for something to take place. We can go to concerts or buy CD’s. Music is a very important part of our lives.

    Today we are going to explore sound through music. We will see how music has been around a long time and has become intertwined with everything we do no matter where we are or where we come from.

    Activity
    1. Take a sheet of paper out and we will take a few notes as we go along.
      Vocabulary words to listen for:
      1. Sound (a type of energy made by vibrations)
      2. Vibrate (when something disturbs the air, that movement is called vibration)
      3. Sound waves (Vibration disturbs the air creating sound waves which move away from the disturbance until the energy is gone)
      4. Noise (unorganized sound)
      5. Music (organized sound)
      6. Singing (musical sound created by a person pushing air through their vocal chords)
      7. Musical Instrument (a tool for creating music by striking, strumming or blowing into or over an opening – a bottle or a tube)
    2. What is sound?
      1. Sound is a type of energy made by vibrations. I have a tuning fork used to tune pianos. When I tap the tuning fork what happens (Hit the tuning fork on your hand or table top.) This movement is called a vibration. These vibrations disturb the air creating sound waves, which keep going until they run out of energy. If your ear is within the range of those sound waves, you hear sound.
      2. (Have students clap their hands three times) When I asked you to clap your hands, what happened? (You disturbed the air causing it to vibrate and that movement created sound waves. Can we see the sound waves? (no) but we can hear them.
      3. If we make irregular sound waves which become unorganized sound, they are considered noise. (Make a motion in the air with your hand going up and down in a random way or make a drawing on the board of waves that are close together and far apart, in other words, random)i.e. ll lll l llll ll lllllll
      4. If those waves are regular repeated or organized waves, you hear musical sounds. (Make a large motion with your hand in an even up and down movement gradually making the motion smaller and smaller or draw on the board a very even pattern going up and down and gradually getting smaller). i.e. llll llll llll llll
    3. How do we hear these sounds?
      1. When air waves vibrate against your ear drum.
      2. Sound is heard when the vibration of air waves hit your ear drum. Our ear drum is so sensitive, we can even hear someone whispering. We have just been whispering to each other. You could hear the person next to you even though I couldn’t hear what you were each saying because I wasn’t close enough. If we talk in an indoor voice, we can hear within the classroom. If we use our outdoor voices, we can be heard from a great distance. Music can also be loud or soft, but is much more pleasant to listen to than noise.
      3. Turn to your partner and in a whisper share five places you have heard music. After 2 minutes we will list on the board under our music column different places we hear music.
      4. By using our list on the board, let’s think about how the music was performed. Whisper to your partner again and try to come up with three ways the music we listed above was performed. (Singing, guitars, drums band etc.)
    4. Looking at our list of types of music let’s figure out how the music was made.
      1. Music is created by people using their body for making sound or by adding a tool called an instrument to make sound.
      2. So music can be made by people alone or with the help of an instrument.
    5. How do people make music?
      1. By using various parts of their body.
      2. People make music by pushing air over their vocal chords, pushing air between their lips, or clapping their hands or stomping their feet. Singing usually has words but singing can happen by just singing vowels like ah or oh. Air being blown between the lips is usually considered to be humming or whistling. So people can make music just by using their bodies.
      3. Some historians believe that people made a crude type of music with their voices before they even talked. Mothers hummed to their babies, while whistling was used to warn others that someone was coming. Imagine what that would be like a long time ago before cell phones and other technology.
      4. Over time people wanted to create music with more than just their bodies. So they started hitting something with a stick in a rhythmic pattern. The drum was born. Someone discovered you could stretch strings across a hollow bowl and strum them their fingers. Thus a lute or guitar-like instrument came into being. Someone tried blowing through a hollow reed and the recorder and oboe were born. Gradually many types of instruments were made.
    6. So what is an instrument?
      1. An instrument can be something that creates sound by hitting something or being beat like a drum, by strumming something with strings like a guitar or by being something you can blow on or into like a recorder or oboe.
      2. They all sound different from each other but are still considered to be a musical instrument.
    7. What makes sounds different from each other?
      1. Pitch - the speed at which the vibrations are causing the air waves to travel creates different pitches.
      2. Our ear drum is so sensitive we can hear different pitches based on how fast the sound waves are traveling.
      3. High pitches are created by very rapidly moving vibrations or sound waves, while very low pitches are created by slower vibrations or sound waves. Even two people talking have different pitches which makes it possible for us to recognize one person’s voice from another. Animals make sounds that are different pitches as well. Birds are very high and bears have a very low and loud sound.


    Because birds or other animals create different sounds, when we hear instruments that sound like animals, we think of when we were around them. Sometimes music is used to help us create a feeling of being somewhere special or make us think of a different place or time. An example of this idea is in the video we are going to watch.

    One of the early instruments used by Native Americans here in North Dakota was a type of flute or what was called a flageolet made out of a reed or hollow piece of wood. I want you to listen to an example of this type of musical instrument used by Keith Bear. He shows us an example of both singing and playing an instrument.

    Learning Activities

    Learning Activity Number I
    Video clip No. 1, Keith Bear
    1. Hand out questions.
    2. Write down the answers to the following questions as you discover them in the video. (The questionnaire attachment has these questions without the answers.)
      1. Is Keith Bear singing or playing an instrument at the beginning of the video? (He is playing an instrument)
      2. Describe the flute? Is he blowing into it, hitting it or strumming it. (He is blowing into the flute)
      3. Is the pitch high or low? (High)
      4. What can we guess about the speed of the vibrations hitting our ear drum? Are they fast or slow? ( The speed of the vibrations are very fast).
    3. Watch the video and discuss.

    Let’s listen to another example of a musical instrument.

    Learning Activity Number II (Possibly day 2)
    (If this is day two review the discussion from the day before.)
    Video no. 2 – The oboe

    1. Discussion:
      The flute played by Keith Bear was used to help us feel like we were out in the open spaces by a river where we could hear birds and feel unhurried. It was relaxing and quiet.
    2. The next type of instrument is being played by Jennifer Peterson, who is also blowing into an instrument, but we will notice it has a different sound. It will make us think of something different.
    3. Hand out the worksheet with questions about the next video.
      1. What does the first melody she plays sound like? (A snake charmer playing to a snake in a basket. Because of the sound the snake rises out of the basket and moves back and forth to the sound.)
      2. What pitch or note does the oboe play for the orchestra? (The Oboe plays an A which is considered a central pitch that all the instruments tune their instruments to before starting to play a piece of music.)
      3. What is the shape of an Oboe? (The oboe is conical in shape which is like a triangle. It is narrow at the top and wider at the bottom.)
      4. Name one kind of wood the oboe is made from? (Oboes are generally made from Granadilla wood found in Africa, or violet wood and snake wood found in Europe.)
      5. How is the reed for the oboe made? (Reeds for an oboe are usually made from cane.)
    4. What are some differences between the two videos?
      1. The Native American flute is often played alone where the oboe is usually part of an orchestra.
      2. The flute originated with the Native Americans so is probably much older than the oboe which is traced back to the early 17 hundreds.
      3. The flute doesn’t have a double reed like the oboe has.
      4. The setting for the performing of these two instruments is very different. The Oboe will probably be found in a concert hall, while the flute might be played outside in a nature-like setting. Both are great instruments.)

    Can we make an instrument? Let’s try.

    Culminating Activity

    The students will make a reed type instrument from a plastic straw.

    MATERIALS:
  • Pass out a straw for each student.
  • Pinch one end of the straw together
  • With a scissor cut a v shape at the pinched end through both sides of the straw.
  • The straw may be cut at various lengths to change the pitches.
  • If you wanted to have somewhat of a scale of sound, leave one straw full length and cut a half inch off the next straw and then 1 1/2 inches off the next etc.
  • Cross-Curricular Activity

    MATERIALS:
    Draw a picture or write a story explaining one of the things listed below.

    Explain one of the following:
  • How is sound, vibration and pitch made?
  • Explain about music being organized sound.
  • Explain about the two cultural examples of music being played by a type of flute and by an oboe.
  • Explain about how pitch can be determined by the length of the straw or instrument.
  • Community Connections

    Invite the students to attend a musical concert in the community. Bring in an announcement from the newspaper or a poster or a ticket of a concert in the community. Remind them to think about how the sound is made, what type of music is being performed, what instruments are being used and whether the music is something they have heard before or is new to them.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Handout sheets
  • Straws
  • Scissors
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Thank a Veteran — A Community Celebration of Veteran’s Day G 3-6

    Written By: Jennifer Tjaden
    Grade Level: Grades 3-6

    Time Allotment

  • 2-3 45 minute class periods
  • 2-3 weeks before Veteran’s Day
  • 30 minutes for s school-wide assembly
  • Overview

    These lessons focus on the importance of recognizing those in our communities who have served the United States of America in order to protect the laws that govern us. It is important for students to understand that the basic liberties that they have today are because our country stands up for these rights. The students in my classroom will learn about Veteran’s Day and promote a community wide celebration of the Veterans in our community. Each student will be a part of a reader’s theater that will present a skit to each classroom in grades K-6. They will share the importance of Veteran’s Day as well as share the school wide poster contest in which the winners in each grade will be published in the local newspaper. All posters will be displayed in the hallways of the school throughout Veteran’s Day. On the last school day before/on Veteran’s day, we will have a school-wide assembly where local veterans are invited to attend. This assembly will include our elementary choir singing, the local Boy Scout chapter presenting the flag, and a chosen veteran to speak to our students. We will also have a possibility of student essays or poems read as well as taps played.

    Lesson Plan - PRTTI-ThankAVeteranLessonPlan-2.doc
    Paragraph Rubric - Paragraph_Rubric.pdf
    Example Article - ThankaVetFocusQuestions.doc
    Questions - ThankaVetFocusQuestions1.doc
    Powerpoint - ThankaVetPPGuide.pptx
    Theater Script - ThankAVetReadersTheaterScript.doc
    Poster - veterans_day_poster.pdf

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts, Social Studies, Art/Performance

    Learning Objectives

    The students will:
  • Recognize that there are many heroes who are in our community that have served our country to give us the freedoms we have today.
  • Gain respect for those who have served our country.
  • Be able to organize and write a paragraph to show what they know about Veteran’s Day.
  • Use their reading, writing, and speaking skills to help younger students understand why we celebrate Veteran’s Day.
  • Show their appreciation for those in the community through their art.
  • Participate in their community through the poster contest and the Veteran’s Day program.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    If you have Learn360 or United Streaming, the following video is included in the lesson with focus questions:
    Veteran's Day Ceremonies and Events. Colman Communications 2006 Retrieved July 16, 2012, from Learn360:
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=227435
    This is a great overview of what you may want to show.

    If you do not have these programs, another video to use would be:
    History of Veterans- History Channel
    http://www.history.com/videos/history-of-veterans-day#history-of-veterans-day

    Materials

  • 1 Reader’s Theater Script per student- Veteran’s Day written by Mrs. Tjaden
  • Poster Contest Rules- 1 per student at the school
  • Crayons, Markers, etc. for poster contest
  • PowerPoint “Veteran’s Day” to help guide the lesson and give a visual
  • Lined Paper & pencil for writing activity
  • Old military uniforms, hats, items to help set up excitement
  • Books on wars to set up in a browsing station in your room
  • Teacher Preparation

    Before you begin, sit down with your principal or Veteran’s Day committee to see if there are others interested or if this is something that your school is interested in doing. I promote the poster contest and take that on myself, but the Veteran’s Day program is set up by someone else. I also talk to teachers about coming into their classroom to do the skits and have them sign up for a time that works the best for them. The overall time of the skits is around 2-3 minutes. I have found that this is a wonderful way to get students to do some public speaking in front of people other than their classmates. They are very proud to have even the smallest role. The skits are done about 2 weeks before Veteran’s Day in order to give time to create the posters. Some teachers do the posters in their class, while others ask students to create them at home on their own time. I chose to use our local newspaper to bring in a more community aspect, but the posters easily could just be displayed in the hallway as well. The reward for the poster contest has been publication in the newspaper, which is a win-win for our community.

    More specifics to do:
    1. Copy Reader’s Theater Scripts & poster contest information.
    2. Contact newspaper. Find out amount of space you can use (how many posters). Write and article inviting Veterans to your program.
    3. Watch your clips of: Veteran's Day Ceremonies and Events. Colman Communications 2006 from Learn360:
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=227435. This is a great overview of what you may want to show.
    4. Collect a few uniforms for props for their Reader’s Theater skits. Kids LOVE uniforms and it gets everyone interested if they are even just wearing a hat or a jacket.
    5. Collect books about wars and have them around the room. It is a great interest catcher, and will give students something to do when they are done with independent work.

    Introductory Activities

    1. Have a number of uniforms around the room on display or wear one as you start your lesson. You could also have a few newspapers with headlines from different wars for students to be looking at as they enter the room.
    2. Using the Veteran’s Day Powerpoint:
      1. KWL strategy- Have students write what they know about Veteran’s Day (2-3) minutes “What do you know about Veteran’s Day?”
      2. Share with partner for 1 minute.
      3. Class discussion- Why do you think it is important?

    Learning Activities

    1. “At this time I need to have 3 volunteers”.
      1. Get volunteers up in front.
      2. Have assign students each a role in the Reader’s Theater script(see handout). You will be a part of the group presenting.
      3. Present the Reader’s Theater.
      4. “Next week, our class will be teaching the rest of the school about the importance of Veteran’s Day. Each of you will have a chance to present this Reader’s Theater in front of students from our school. Did you notice that there is time for questions at the end? What will you say? Do you know very much about Veteran’s Day right now?”
    2. “If you were going to learn more about this topic where would you look?”
      1. Discussion.
      2. Example...Internet , books, etc.
    3. “Today we will be using a video clip from A & E TV that talks about Veteran’s Day. We not only learn at school, but anything we see on TV we are learning about. There are great shows on that we learn from.”
      1. Give examples from History Channel, National Geographic, PBS, etc.
    4. “As we watch this clip, there is some great information to help you with those questions that students will be asking you. Remember you will be the expert! I’ve created some focus questions to look for as you watch.”
      1. Direct Focus Go over questions before the video(see handout).
      2. Questions are in order of the video clip.
      3. “As you are watching, please feel free to answer the questions. You will have some time at the end to do so as well.”
    5. Watch “ Veteran's Day Ceremonies and Events. Colman Communications 2006 from Learn360:
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=227435.”
      OPTIONAL- History Channel Video; you will want to preview and tweak the enclosed focus questions to your needs.
    6. “ Now we are going to share our knowledge with others. In your groups at your table, share what answers you have for each question. See if yours match up, and if they don’t discuss and figure out together what is the correct answer. When your group is finished, you will be sharing your knowledge with me through writing. BY YOURSELF, write a 5 sentence paragraph about what Veteran’s Day is. Make sure to use the 5 sentence paragraph writing rubric we have been talking about in school. If you finish early, take time to browse through the books at the back table.” (15 minutes)
    7. When most students done, go over answers to focus questions. Have a couple of students share their writing. Have students turn in for you to check their understanding.
    8. “Now you have shared what you have learned with me and your classmates, but you will be sharing your knowledge with kids in the school!

    Culminating Activity

    1. “I’ve assigned each of you to a group. Each group will decide who is doing which part. Make sure that you are practicing your parts so that you know how to pronounce all the words. You also need to make sure that you read loudly so all students can hear you and that you aren’t boring!” Model examples. “I will give you time today in class, and another practice tomorrow, but you will need to prepare you part at home as well. You will need to decide what props you will need as well. You are welcome to use my uniforms, but make sure that you change the script to what uniform you are using.”
    2. Give about 20 minutes of practice time one day. Give another 10 minutes the next day. Then assign presentations to other classrooms. You may have kids going at different times or they all may go out of your room at once. This is your choice. If their times are staggered, have an activity that groups can work on back in the classroom independently. This would be a great time to work on creating posters for the contest.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Poster Contest
    Students in our class will have a chance to create the posters. The best will be published in the local newspaper. All posters will be posted in the hallway by the office for all to see.

    Veteran’s Day Program
    Students will lead a program organized by an adult. This will include: a veteran speaking, patriotic songs by the choir, colors presented by the local Boy Scout Troup, poems or essays written by students, taps played by a student, etc.

    Research veterans of different wars using the Library of Congress “Veteran’s History Project”
    The Library of Congress has excellent primary sources of video, audio, pictures, letters, etc. of US war veterans. This website is outstanding and a true treasure of our national history.
    http://www.loc.gov/vets/

    Other Options..
    As an option, teachers may want to go further than just the program and participate in many of the programs out there to help current soldiers who are currently serving our country.

    Here are a few that you may want to check out:
  • Kids For Our Troops: http://www.kidsforourtroops.org/
  • Soldier’s Angels: http://soldiersangels.org/
  • Any Soldier: http://www.anysoldier.com
  • Wounded Warrier Project: http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
  • Community Connections

  • Students will be creating posters that will be published in the local newspaper
  • Veteran’s Day Program inviting the public in
  • Create your own oral history museum or visit one like the Perham, Minnesota’s Veterans Museum “In their Own Words”. View this clip on the museum from the North Dakota Studies Website to see more about it.
    http://www.ndstudies.org/media/minnesota_cultural_destinations_in_their_own_words_veterans_museum_perham_m


  • STUDENT MATERIALS:
  • Reader’s Theater for each student
  • Poster Contest Rules- 1 per student in classroom
  • Paper
  • Pencils
  • Crayons
  • Markers
  • Uniforms for their skits
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Mic, Do you Measure up? G 9

    Written By: Michael Walther
    Grade Level: Grades 9-12

    Time Allotment

    2 to 3 hours for complete unit

    Overview

    Lesson Plan - Mic,_do_you_measure_up_Lesson.docx
    Barrel Measurements - Barrel_measurments.docx
    Barrel Measurements Key - Barrel_measurments_key.docx
    Micrometer Measurements Exercise - Micrometer_Measurement_Exercise.docx
    Micrometer Measurements Worksheet - Micrometer_measurments_WS.docx
    Micrometer Parts Picture - micrometer_parts_pic.docx
    Micrometer Reading Websites - Micrometer_reading_websites.docx

    Subject Matter

    Math, Business & Industry

    Learning Objectives

    Goal: after completion of this unit the student will have introductory skills needed to facilitate reading a micrometer.

    Objective 1: Given verbal prompts the student will identify the main parts of a micrometer with 100 % accuracy.

    Objective 2: Given a instruction on the divisions on the barrel of a micrometer the student will complete a worksheet with 90% or better accuracy.

    Objective 3: Given appropriate instruction (including classroom instruction and video presentations) the student will complete a worksheet representing both barrel and thimble reading with 90% or better accuracy.

    Materials

    1. 0-1 inch micrometers for each student (or share if necessary)
    2. 30 pieces for measurement under 1 inch in thickness or diameter (for exercise 3.0) . These could include pieced of metal, drill bits, pieces of paper, hair from different people, etc.
    3. Student work packet for student consisting of:
      1. 1.0 Micrometer Parts
      2. .1.2 Barrel Measurement Exercise
      3. 2.0 Micrometer Reading Websites
      4. .2.1 Micrometer Measurements Worksheet
      5. .3.0 Micrometer Measurement Exercise
    4. Access to internet

    Introductory Activities

    1. Introduce the idea that fractional measurements are not adequate for many industrial applications such as automobile parts, staples, molds for plastics, etc.
    2. Introduce the idea that measurements are done in 1/1000 of an inch or smaller. This may require a review of decimals for some students.
    3. Direct the students attention to 1.0 micrometer parts pic and put
      http://www.ustudy.in/sites/default/files/images/micrometer.jpg in the white board or wall. ( for purposes of this lesson emphasize identification of Sleeve and Thimble)
    4. Explain that there are two displays (scales) of measurement on the micrometer, one on the Sleeve and one on the Thimble.
    5. For the first activity we will work with the scale on the Sleeve.
    6. Distribute “1.2 Measurements on Barrel of Micrometer”
    7. Review & complete the first page together with the Students.
    8. Have the students complete the second page on their own.
    9. If appropriate mastery occurs continue to the next exercise, if not review as necessary to insure mastery.
    Learning Activities
    1. Watch the video with the students at:
      http://www.wisc-online.com/Objects/ViewObject.aspx?ID=MTL1902
    2. Talk the student through the activities in a group discussion format.
    3. If the students have micrometers write decimal measurements on the white board and have them set the micrometers to the measurement.
    4. Have the student complete worksheet “2.1 micrometer measurements”
    5. If students are not mastering the activity have them refer to the following other videos.
      http://mathonline.southseattle.edu/math110/worksheets/worksheet6auto.pdf
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=oiAutI0i5YE&feature=endscreen
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i_jygJkJujE&feature=fvwrel

    Culminating Activity

    1. For the final activity set out 30 numbered pieces for measurement in the room….(drill bits small pieces of metal, various thicknesses of paper or firm cardboard, strands of hair, fishing line, and other items of possible interest to the students). Give the students copied of “3.0 Micrometer measurement Exercise.” Depending on the availability of micrometers have the students work individually or in groups to complete the worksheet.
    2. Depending on mastery level refer to videos, work individually with students, or pair successful students with those who struggle. Keep in mind the dollar, quarter, penny method of reading a micrometer.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    The use of micrometers utilizes skills from math. The skill is used in industry as well as in science.

    Community Connections

    The micrometer is used in manufacturing, automotive shops, and in activities from measuring fishing line to determining the thickness of a piece of paper.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Steaming Up the Heart of America G 8

    Written By: Deborah Davy
    Grade Level: Grade 8

    Time Allotment

    Three 55-minute class periods

    Overview

    This is a preparatory lesson for teaching The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain. The lesson is designed to familiarize students with the conditions of life in the “heart of America,” the American Frontier, at the time of Mark Twain’s childhood (and the setting for Tom Sawyer), Missouri in the 1830’s. The lesson will also explore the use of steamboats on the Red River on the North Dakota/Minnesota border in the 1860’s, where conditions were similar to that of Missouri thirty years earlier, allowing students to gain a greater understanding and make a more personal connection with the events in the novel.

    Lesson Plan - Steaming_Up_the_Heart_of_America.docx
    Powerpoint - Mark_Twain’s_America.pptx

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts (Literature, Reading, Biography), American History

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
  • Have an increased understanding of the living conditions for the people of Hannibal, MO before the arrival of the steamboat.
  • Understand how the steamboat transformed life for the people living on the Mississippi River.
  • Make a personal connection with the book, Tom Sawyer, by understanding the parallels between the development of Hannibal and the development of Fargo caused by the steamboat.
  • Be able to place historical events in Fargo in relation to the events occurring in the novel.
  • Gain an appreciation for the remoteness and relative difficulty of life on the frontier.
  • Develop critical thinking skills through guided questioning.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    1. Mark Twain: His Amazing Adventure. Biography, Cat. No. AAE-71062
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=226946&SearchText=Mark+Twain++His+Amazing+Adventure
    2. Steamboats on the Red; a Story of Buccaneers and Robber Barons. Prairie Public Productions, 2011.
    3. PowerPoint presentation,“Mark Twain’s America”.

    Materials

  • Quote and questions sheet (provided).
  • One copy each of two videos (listed above) OR link to website for the first video.
  • PowerPoint presentation on “Mark Twain’s America”.
  • Teacher Preparation

  • Before class: Have the DVD’s and handouts ready.
  • Open the PowerPoint presentation on your computer.
  • Project or write the Twain quote at the top of the board. Leave room to draw a timeline later. Have this showing when class begins.
  • Queue up the Mark Twain biography DVD to the beginning of the film.
  • Introductory Activities

    1. Introduce the following quote by Mark Twain, then ask students to respond to it. Some possible discussion questions are provided separately (below).
      “When I was a boy, there was but one permanent ambition among my comrades in our village on the west bank of the Mississippi River. That was, to be a steamboatman. We had transient ambitions of other sorts, but they were only transient. When a circus came and went, it left us all burning to become clowns; the first negro minstrel show that came to our section left us all suffering to try that kind of life; now and then we had a hope that if we lived and were good, God would permit us to be pirates. These ambitions faded out, each in its turn; but the ambition to be a steamboatman always remained.” - Mark Twain, from Life on the Mississippi
    2. Ask students to imagine life in the middle of the continent in the 1830’s. How might Mark Twain have spent his free time? What activities do kids today have available to them? (Eg. video games, bikes, football, board games, listening to music, etc.) Write these activities on the board, leaving room for the timeline.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. Draw a timeline from 1830 to 2012 across the entire board. Mark the time in decades. Ask students to guess when each activity or technology from their list was invented or established. Then give them the correct dates and mark them on the timeline. Reinforce how few of these were available to Twain in the 1830’s.
    2. Show the PowerPoint presentation, “Mark Twain’s America” and discuss the main events and conditions of the time period. Reinforce the appeal of the steamboat to a boy living on the Mississippi River at that time.
    3. Hand out the “Notes on Mark Twain Video” sheets. Direct students’ attention to the focus questions on their sheets.
    4. Show the first 15 minutes of the Twain video. Keep the lights on during viewing.
    5. Stop the video a few minutes before the end of class to allow students to record answers to any questions on these scenes that they may have missed.
    6. Make sure to note the place in the film where you stopped.


    Day 2
    Preparation:
  • Queue up the Mark Twain biography DVD to the place where you ended the day before.
  • Keep the lights on.

    1. Make sure students have their Notes sheets ready. Direct students’ attention to the focus questions on their sheets.
    2. Show the rest of the Twain film.
    3. Facilitate a student discussion of the film, making sure to reinforce Twain’s love of steamboats and piloting them.
    4. Go over the answers to the questions on the students’ Notes sheet.


    Day 3
    Preparation:
  • Queue up the “Steamboats on the Red River” DVD to the first scene.
  • Keep the lights on.
    1. Introduce the topic of steamboats on the Red River. Ask what students know about the history of Fargo and steamboats.
    2. Hand out the “Notes on Steamboats” question sheets.
    3. Show the video, “Steamboats on the Red”.
    4. Facilitate a student discussion of the film. Suggested questions are provided separately (below).

    Culminating Activity

    This activity is done after the above lesson. Students write a reflection about what does and does not appeal to them about how they imagine life in the 1830’s. Allow time for students to share their thoughts in pairs or as a group.

    This activity is done after students have completed reading The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Students write a reflection in which they compare Tom Sawyer’s childhood to their own.
    Some possibilities to consider:
  • In what ways might life in the 1830’s have been better than growing up today? How might it have been worse?
  • What would you miss most about the things you have and are able to do today?
  • Consider the relative safety and convenience of modern life compared to life on the American frontier in the 1830’s. How well do you think you would deal with the hardships?
  • How much freedom and independence does Tom have compared to you? How do you feel about the differences?
  • What are your thoughts about the way children were treated by adults (parents, teachers, community members) in the novel? Compare that with today, and give your opinion.
  • Cross-Curricular Activity

    This lesson has the potential to work as a cross-curricular unit with Social Studies/American History if the Social Studies curriculum at the school includes the same time period as the novel (1830’s). As this is not the case in my school, no cross-curricular activities have been developed.

    Community Connections

    A field trip to view historical exhibitions at the Hjemcomst Center museum in Moorhead, MN, that depict early settler life in the Red River Valley could provide reinforcement and elaboration of the lesson.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Finding the main idea: A Chat with your Favorite Teen/Youth Authors G 7

    Written By: Kellie Pifer
    Grade Level: Grades 6 - 8

    Time Allotment

    One 45 minute class period, and 20 minutes the following day, or more.

    Overview

    Students watch pbs.org video clips of authors speaking about their own writing. Authors are ones students will either be familiar with from precious reading, or a good introduction for independent reading: Avi, Katherine Paterson, Walter Dean Myers, R.L. Stine.

    Lesson Plan - Finding_the_Main_Idea_Lesson.doc
    Author Worksheet - Authors_WS.docx
    Main Idea Powerpoint - The_main_idea.pptx

    Subject Matter

  • Choosing the main idea and responding to “literature” or in this case, the video-taped interview.
  • Finding details in a video clip to use for research.
  • Note-taking from which to write a topic sentence.
  • Creating a cohesive paragraph of information by starting with a topic sentence, then adding details.
  • Learning Objectives

  • Choosing the main idea and responding to “literature” or in this case, the video-taped interview.
  • Finding details in a video clip to use for research.
  • Note-taking from which to write a paragraph.
  • Creating a cohesive paragraph of information.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    R.L. Stine
  • http://bcove.me/alfmnjok
  • http://bcove.me/0k03ooyl
  • http://bcove.me/udhard77


  • Katherine Paterson
  • http://bcove.me/nowd5jp2
  • http://bcove.me/rh4jqljd
  • http://bcove.me/2tsvn8is


  • Avi
  • http://bcove.me/7rhus62w
  • http://bcove.me/bz2up16o


  • Walter Dean Myers
  • http://bcove.me/t8qwhq0e
  • http://bcove.me/t8qwhq0e
  • http://bcove.me/t8qwhq0e
  • Materials

  • Power point template or exact copy of mine.
  • Computer with internet
  • Projector and screen
  • Hand-out for the Powerpoint
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. View Clips and read –through lesson.
    2. Have power point, internet and computer ready.
    3. Be ready to discuss what makes a main idea and how to create the topic sentence.

    Introductory Activities

    This qualifies as an introductory activity itself, for students at an early stage of finding a main idea or creating a topic sentence. The step-by-step approach is four-fold. With each author introduced in the power point, students get more independent in their writing, until they are able to write alone.

    Learning Activities

    1. Listening skills and picking out key words and main ideas.
    2. Watch clips from R. L. Stine. Answer questions.
    3. Watch clips from Katherine Paterson. Work with small group and class at large. Fill in blanks on handout.
    4. Watch clips from Avi. Work with a partner. Fill in blanks.
    5. Watch clips from Walter Dean Myers. Work alone.
    6. Read some topic sentences aloud. Receive teacher feedback.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Students will choose one of the Walter Dean Myers clips.
    2. Students will create notes and details from the clip.
    3. Students will find the main idea from which to write a topic sentence.
    4. Students will add details from the clip and write the rest of a cohesive paragraph.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    1. In the “For fun” part of the lesson, students will choose an author to find out more about. This will lead to independent reading. Library books are checked out every two weeks. This gives students who may not have ideas about good teen authors, somewhere to start.
    2. History. This lesson will be a precursor to more research and writing during a famous American unit. Students choose a famous American to research and must take notes and find the main idea, then report on that American to inform their classmates.

    Community Connections

    1. Our library at Ben Franklin invites two to three authors in per year. This lesson promotes good listening skills for learning from those authors and digging deeper by asking questions during the talk-back phase of those visits.
    2. Our community library will house these author’s books. Students who use the library will be able to find the books there.
    3. The varied subject matter written about by the authors such as sports, fantasy, scary stories, loss, social work and needs, school difficulties and inner city struggles leads students to a better understanding of their own community and its varied qualities.


    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    1. The hand out for use with power point.
    2. Extra paper.
    3. Pencil.
    4. In a later activity students will be using school computers for typing, researching.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Important Interview! G 11-12

    Written By: Elizabeth Plemel-Scott
    Grade Level: Resource English 11-12

    Time Allotment

    11-12 days~ 11-12 class periods, each 50 minutes long

    Overview

    Students have completed the preparatory work of finding a career they are interested in and have written a business letter, a resume’, and an application. In these lessons, students will prepare to be interviewed; understanding the importance of appearance, the interview questions, and communication skills. Allow one extra day to expand on topics students may need further assistance with.

    Lesson Plan - The_Important_Interview.docx

    Subject Matter

    English for the World of Work

    Learning Objectives

    The student will:
  • Understand the appropriate dress, neatness and cleanliness for a good impression during an interview
  • Be able to answer questions correctly and completely during an interview
  • Know how to communicate successfully during an interview
  • Teach and Learn basic interviewing skills and preparation
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    Learn 360~ Interviewing Tips and Traps, Interviewing Tips for Teens, Prepare, Your First Job and Getting It.
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=131829

    About.com~ Video-Quick Tip: Answering “What Can You Contribute” in a Job Interview
    http://video.about.com/jobsearch/Quick-Tip--Answering--What-Can-You-Contribute--in-a-Job-Interview.htm
    http://video.about.com/jobsearch/Teen-Job-Interview-Attire.htm

    Non verbal communication: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8IYAAQGSyg

    Do’s and Don’ts: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYjZ0mQNRyw&feature=fvwrel

    Answer to the 5 toughest questions: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAqdZ2Q92VA&feature=related

    Materials

  • Article Handout: 10 Tips for Coping with Job Interview Anxiety
    http://socialanxietydisorder.about.com/od/copingwithsad/a/jobinterviewtips.htm
  • Textbook: English for the World of Work.
  • Non-Verbal Communication Word Cards (if choose to use)
    http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviews/tp/jobinterviewtips.htm American Guidance Service, Inc. 2001
  • Facilitating Career Development Student Test. National Career Development, 2008.
  • Creating Your High School Portfolio 3rd Edition. Jist Works Publishing, 2009.
  • Teacher Created Interview Script
  • You’re Hired!: Employers Give Tips for Successful Interviewing
    Interview Rubric
    Portfolios
    Anticipation Quiz- You’re Hired Student Workbook, Jist Publishing
  • Teacher Preparation

    1. You will need to preview all of the videos and mark where you would like to begin.
    2. Bookmark the Web Sites, load plug-ins, prepare student materials and all papers needed for the lessons.
    3. Have cut out pictures, from magazines, of people dressed in various ways.

    Introductory Activities

    DAY 1
    Students will have been working for the previous two months on their portfolio, resume, and job preparation skills.

    1. Give the Anticipation Quiz, score and discuss results.
    2. Introduce vocabulary:
      1. Appropriate
      2. Communicate
      3. Impression
      4. Deodorant
      5. Distraction
      6. Jewelry
      7. Selection
      8. Social
      9. Embellishing
      10. Interview
    3. Hold up each picture in front of the class and ask students to decide which people are dressed appropriately for a job interview at a local business.
    4. Follow-up with a brief discussion on appropriate dress and why they think one picture is more or less appropriate. Complete Community Connection 6 (Student Workbook).
    5. Choose one of the following videos and show to the group. Time varies from 1:42 to 8:22. You may choose to show parts of a video or the entire clip.
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYjZ0mQNRyw&feature=fvwrel
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zEYExokLbro&feature=fvwrel
      http://video.about.com/jobsearch/Teen-Job-Interview-Attire.htm
    6. Discuss appropriate dress and inappropriate dress. Have students share what they have that would be appropriate dress.
    7. Brainstorm and discuss Global Connections: Dress Codes, Language, Appearance, Eye Contact, Handshake. Practice introducing self to others in the classroom as you would think is an appropriate introduction for a job interview.

    Learning Activities

    DAY 2
    Administer Pre-Test, from textbook, to the group. Assure them this isn’t graded but will be used as a guidance for direction in the topics necessary to be learned.
    1. Discuss the importance of the initial interview. Each student will be able to answer:
      1. What is an Interview?
        An interview is a meeting between a job applicant and a representative of the company. The meeting comes about because the company had a job available. People applied for the job. The company needs to decide who to hire.
      2. Purpose of the Interview?
        The purpose of the interview is for the company to get a good look at you. It is the company’s chance to ask you questions about your experiences. It is also the company’s opportunity to see if you would fit in with the other employees. Use the resources from the textbook- pg 96.
    2. Career Portfolio 7- Job Interview Checklist- Textbook.
    3. Review how someone would dress and prepare for an interview. Read pages 98-99.


    DAY 3
    1. Read pages 96-98 in textbook.
    2. Complete workbook activity page 25.
    3. Share with a partner.
    4. Complete activity of “Preparing for an Interview”. This can be done on a large piece of paper and hung on the classroom wall for reference later.
    5. Invite volunteers to choose one of the 15 items from the Activity to mime.
    6. Encourage the class to guess which item the volunteer is miming.
    7. After the class activity, encourage each student to add items to the chart as the ideas occur to them.
    8. Wrap-Up: Ask each student to suggest one example of a piece of clothing or jewelry that would be appropriate and one that would be inappropriate to wear to an interview for the job of an office worker in a small company. Have students explain why the piece is appropriate or inappropriate.


    DAY 4
    1. Watch the following video~
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=131829&SearchText=interview
    2. Ask students to focus on and plan to share, after the video, one thing they’ve learned about the interview process from this video.
    3. Write down, while watching the video, two questions they would be comfortable answering and two questions they need help with answering.
    4. Discuss highlights of the interview.
    5. If any students have been on a job interview invite them to share their experiences with the rest of the class. Encourage them to be as specific as possible- sharing both the process and the specific questions asked.
    6. Share questions students wrote down during the video.
    7. Brainstorm for answers to all questions.
    8. Read and complete the activity on Page 102 of the student text.
    9. The activity: List at least 5 things that Barry did that probably impressed Ms. Mendez.
    10. Discuss anything Barry could have done differently and role play options he could choose. Encourage each student to pick one role play and change it up to make it a positive experience.


    DAY 5
    1. Communication is the topic for this lesson.
    2. Define communication: verbal and nonverbal.
    3. Review the interview between Barry and Ms. Mendez.
    4. Complete Activity A, page 103 Student text, with a partner.
    5. Come to an agreement on the best answer.
    6. Each group will share one question and most appropriate answer with the class.
    7. Teacher - Demonstrate several body languages and have the students guess what is being expressed.
    8. May need word prompt cards to help students, with special needs, decide which non-spoken communication skill is being demonstrated.
    9. If teacher chooses to use prompt cards, give cards to each students to use.
    10. View and discuss communication skills from the video -
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D8IYAAQGSyg


    DAY 6
    1. Job Questions: Show the video “The answers to the 5 toughest job questions”
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DAqdZ2Q92VA&feature=related
    2. Ask students to write down several questions they would like to ask the Interviewer if they would ever have that opportunity. Keep these questions in an envelope to be given to the guest speaker on Day 9.
    3. After the video — Job Interview Follow-Up Questions:
      1. Why is doing well in interviews now more important than ever?
      2. What do the experts say you shouldn’t do in an interview?
      3. Why do they say you should do?
      4. What does the phrase equal opportunity employer mean (in your opinion)?
      5. True or False: In the US, it’s illegal to ask, “Do you have a history of health problems?”
      6. What should you do if you are asked a discriminatory question?
    4. http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewquestionsanswers/a/interviewquest.htm
    5. Encourage students to go to this web site and work through the questions and answers to some common and some difficult interview questions.


    DAY 7
    1. Invite the owner or a manager of a local company to speak with the class about how an interview is conducted in a business.
    2. Perhaps the teacher and the manager/owner can do a mock interview for the class.
    3. On page 104 of teacher text, there is a list of important points the speaker will be asked to cover in the presentation.
    4. This will also be a time the students will present the questions they have for the interviewer.
    5. Read and Review the Summary, page 105, of Chapter 6- Student Text
    6. Assign the Chapter Review Pgs. 106-107 Student Text.


    DAY 8
    1. Write a thank you note to the presenter from Day 7. Students will have already had a lesson on this important topic. These notes will be sent to the Presenter.
    2. Define Social Anxiety. Review the following reactions to anxiety that some interviewees feel.
      1. Shaky legs
      2. Pounding heart
      3. Shortness of breath
      4. Trembling hands
      5. Tense muscles
      6. Trouble thinking clearly
      7. Cold or sweaty palms
      8. Shaky voice
      9. Blushing
    3. http://socialanxietydisorder.about.com/od/symptomsanddiagnosis/a/blushing.htm
    4. Normalize the feelings and discuss ways students have coped with anxiety in the past. Pass out the below anxiety handout and instruct each student to read it silently.
    5. Article Handout: 10 Tips for Coping with Job Interview Anxiety. Students will highlight at least two tips for coping that they feel most comfortable with.
      http://socialanxietydisorder.about.com/od/copingwithsad/a/jobinterviewtips.htm
    6. Review the video and answer any questions students may have about the video.
    7. Have students share the tips they are most comfortable with.
    8. List these tips on the wall board to refer to during the next class day.
    9. Send home a script and ask students to role-play the interview situation with a friend or a relative.
    10. Encourage them to do this several times to build up their confidence and to prepare them more thoroughly for the actual interview.


    DAY 9
    1. Encourage students to share how the role-play interviews went.
    2. Review strengths of each student.
    3. Discuss any anxiety and star the tips students chose to use when they felt anxious.
    4. Have students journal their personal feelings about the role-playing and the tips they used to reduce their anxiety during the interview.
    5. Share the journal with a partner.
    6. Volunteers may share with the entire class.
    7. Discuss any additional ways to reduce anxiety.
    8. Remind students that preparing for a job interview, practicing questions, knowing the company, and dressing for success will help them to reduce anxiety and do well in a job interview.


    DAY 10
    You and your partner will take turns interviewing. First, decide who will be the first job seeker. Next, choose one of the below jobs to apply for. When you’ve chosen, read your role below.

    Fast Food Server
    Duties:Manage orders, refill drinks, customer service, delivery of food services. Requirements: Customer service skills, ability to multi-task, able to serve others. Must be: display excellent organization & interpersonal skills, able to work autonomously and knowledgeable about food safety.

    Salesperson- Hardware Store
    Duties: Assist customers with selecting and purchasing items. Requirements: Customer service skills, stock shelves, money skills. Must be: well-organized, energetic, professional.

    Farm Laborer
    Duties: Perform routine tasks dependent on the type of farming requirements. Requirements: Safety skills, able to lift and carry 40 lbs. knowledge of farm equipment. Must be:: Able to operate machinery, maintain and repair farm equipment.

    (Note: each student reads his/her role only)
    Student A
    (Interviewee)
    You will be interviewed. This is a role-play so you may pretend to have the appropriate background for the position. Take a minute to prepare. Soon, the interview still start.

    Student B
    (Interviewer)
    Decide how you want to structure the interview and what questions to ask (optional: include an inappropriate question). Also, try to think of a scenario related to the job and ask the interviewee how he/she’d behave in that situation. Take a few minutes to prepare. When ready, begin the interview.

    Students may videotape each other and critique using the rubric included in the lesson plan.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Mastery Test B- Correct and review test as a class.
    2. Discuss any points/questions left to be answered.
    3. Add relevant materials to Portfolio.
    4. Review videotapes and complete rubrics.
    5. Discuss strengths and improvements needed.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

  • Interviews, Portfolios, Community Business Owner or Manager
  • Anticipation Quiz
  • ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: The Great Depression in the Midwest G 10-12

    Written By: William Demke
    Grade Level: Grades 10 -12

    Time Allotment

    Two – three 50 minute class periods

    Overview

    Lesson Plan - The_Great_Depression_in_the_Midwest_Lesson_Plan.docx

    Subject Matter

    American History

    Learning Objectives

    The students will understand and exhibit knowledge of the hardship of life in the Great Plains during the great depression.

    Media Components - Video/Web

    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/content/rr10.socst.us.prosp.depress/
    Intro to the Depression
    http://prairiepublic.pbslearningmedia.org/content/pres10.socst.ush.dww.newdeal/
    The New Deal
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=146399&SearchText=Great+Depression%2c+great+plains%2c+midwest
    Midwest Depression
    http://www.prairiepublic.org/radio/dakota-datebook?post=36314
    Dakota Datebook on UND Depression Camp
    http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/5141/preview/
    New Deal Programs in Iowa
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GZPXuCDCij8
    ND Farmers in Great Depression

    Materials

  • A textbook on the depression in the Great Plains or an excerpt from “Going it Alone: Fargo Grapples with the Depression”
  • Video clips that highlight families, artists, workers and the unemployed throughout the Midwest, and internet access.
  • Introductory Activities

    1. Ask students what they know about the Great Depression, set up time for a brainstorm or a pretest to assess what students already know, or “think” they know about this time period in this part of the country.
    2. Cover necessary vocabulary in advance of reading so students will know what they are reading, I suggest doing a Smart Board keyword match activity.

    Learning Activities

    1. As a class or on their own, have students read excerpts from your textbook, or if possible, and if you have permission, from the book “Going it Alone: Fargo Grapples with the Depression”, pause periodically as needed to answer questions and to watch video clips/listen to audio clips that enhance the experience, have students note what they learn from each video so you can have discussion thereafter. There are many video clips available on www.prairiepublic.org, www.learn360.com, or even www. youtube.com.

    2. Compare/Contrast
      1. Due Tuesday Jan. 24thth
      2. Come up with a way to compare and contrast the causes of the Great Depression (1929-1940) and Great Recession (2007-2010). Have several similarities and differences.
      3. Examples would be a chart, a poster, a Venn-diagram, essay, or any other way that achieves this….just let me know.
      4. You may do a chart, a diagram, a short paper (typed), or any other method of presenting the material that you feel will work. If you are uncertain if it will, ask me.
      5. MLA Format for online articles:
        1. Last name,
        2. First name
        3. "Article Title."
        4. Site
        5. Name(in italics).
        6. Organization Name.
        7. Article date.
        8. Web address.
        9. Date of access.
        10. If no author, start with the title. If no date is given you put “n.d.” in place of it
    3. As a concluding activity, introduce students to Prezi.com and have them create a prezi project that covers the attached assessment to see if students have gained the knowledge and understanding of this time period. Instructions that I use follow in point #5.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Students will create a Prezi project that shows the challenges, struggles, and triumphs the people of the great plains experienced during the Great Depression. It will contain the following:
      1. 2 “stops” on the Prezi
      2. 10 Pictures with captions minimum
      3. 2 videos minimum with explanations and reflection
      4. Narration where appropriate
      5. You may choose any aspect of life on the Great Plains as you want, if you want to focus on life in the cities in the Great Plains feel free, if you want to focus on farming, the arts, or any other subtopic you can think of, just clear it with me and you may do that.
    2. If you are “bored” with the project, I’m afraid you must just be a boring person. : )

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Teaching Tessellations or a “fancy word for patterns!” G K

    Written By: Casey Sayles
    Grade Level: Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    3 to 4 math periods

    Overview

    Children will see that patterns are all over the world in many different forms and in our everyday life.

    Lesson Plan - Teaching_Tessellations_Lesson.doc

    Subject Matter

    Art, Art-History, Vocabulary and Mathematics

    Learning Objectives

    Students will:
  • Learn and understand the word “Tessellation” and recognize various patterns using the AB format.
  • Be able to apply their technique when making several of their own patterns.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=131879
  • Type in pbskids and the web page will come up then go to subject math and games, there you will find many pattern activities to choose from for your appropriate age and learning level students).
  • Materials

  • Pattern blocks
  • Graph paper
  • Markers
  • Crayons
  • Oil crayons or whatever coloring utensils you have available


  • I like to use a variety. I have a SMART board to use to show video and play games but the computer screen works too.

    Teacher Preparation

  • This lesson would spread out over three or four days pending on you time allotment and what time of year you presented it.
  • Obviously the attentions span of a kindergarten student is shorter in the beginning of the school year.
  • It is a great lesson to introduce patterns and then can be expanded upon.
  • Introductory Activities

    1. Show Learn360 video.
    2. Walk around School inside and out looking for “Tessellations” they will love the big word.

    Learning Activities

    1. Make a tessellation (pattern)
    2. Draw a tessellation
    3. Be sure to discuss, and display

    Culminating Activity

  • Tessellation will be a word on our word wall and we will refer to it.
  • Kindergarten incorporates patterns throughout the year.
  • Cross-Curricular Activity

    Language Arts
  • Vocabulary


  • Art (shapes, size, color)
  • Drawing Materials


  • Technology
  • Video and SMART board


  • History – Social Studies
  • Art around the world
  • Community Connections

    In our community we have an art gallery we could go to we also have a great connection with the University of Minnesota Morris and have a wonderful relationship with Michael Eble the art professor. I will and have definitely utilized his gift.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: Minnesota Seasons: Slippy, Drippy, Sweaty and Crunchy G K

    Written By: Kathleen Fulks
    Grade Level: Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    Two lessons approximately 30 minutes

    Overview

    The students will work use adjectives ending in y to describe the four seasons. They will also create trees that depict the changes in the seasons through representation of the leaves.

    Lesson Plan - Slippy,_Drippy_..._lesson_plan.doc

    Subject Matter

    Language Arts, Science and Art

    Learning Objectives

    The student will:
  • Recognize that y can say e at the end of a word.
  • Use adjectives ending in y to describe the four seasons.
  • Create four trees showing how the leaves change with the seasons.
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    Citation (MLA)
    Autumn: Harvest, Apples, Pumpkins, Leaves, Trees, Weather. Big Kids Productions. 2005
    Learn360. 05 July 2012
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=515655
    Citation (APA)
    Autumn: Harvest, Apples, Pumpkins, Leaves, Trees, Weather. Big Kids Productions
    2005 Retrieved July 05, 2012, from
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=515655
    Citation (Chicago Manual of Style)
    Big Kids Productions. "Autumn: Harvest, Apples, Pumpkins, Leaves, Trees, Weather"
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=515655

    Citation (MLA)
    Berenstain Bears - Bears For All Seasons. Nelvana. 2004
    Learn360. 05 July 2012
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=129804
    Citation (APA)
    Berenstain Bears - Bears For All Seasons. Nelvana
    2004 Retrieved July 05, 2012
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=129804
    Citation (Chicago Manual of Style)
    Nelvana. "Berenstain Bears - Bears For All Seasons"
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=129804 Citation (MLA)

    Citation (MLA)
    The Outside Song using Sign Language. Two Little Hands Productions. 2009
    Learn360. 05 July 2012
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=679119
    Citation (APA)
    The Outside Song using Sign Language. Two Little Hands Productions
    2009 Retrieved July 05, 2012
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=679119
    Citation (Chicago Manual of Style)
    Two Little Hands Productions. "The Outside Song using Sign Language"
    Learn360: http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=679119

    Media Components - Web
    Read Between the Lions Poem Titled 4 seasons. It is 28 seconds long about 4 clicks down.
    http://pbskids.org/lions/videos/poems.html

    Teacher Preparation

    Day 1
    1. Find the poem Four Seasons
    2. Prepare worksheet with Winter, Spring, Summer and Fall labeled across the top.
    3. Gather handwriting paper, highlighters or highlighting tape.


    Day 2
    1. For each student:
      1. Cut four 6” by 2” strips of brown construction paper
      2. Di-cut 4 handprints- 1 green, 1 yellow and 2 brown.
      3. One 12’’ by 18’’ piece of light blue paper folded vertically into four equal parts.
      4. Pink cotton balls, paper scraps, red pompoms, glue.
    2. Make a sample of the tree picture to show your students.
    3. Prepare the video of your choice: Berenstain Bears, Autumn or the Outside Song.
    4. Use sentence strips to write the describing words from the poem.

    Introductory Activities

    Day 1
    1. Watch the Poem from titled the Four Seasons on Read Between the Lions.
    Day 2
    1. Watch the video of the Berenstain Bears or whichever you have selected from the recommended list.

    Learning Activities

    Day 1
    1. Ask the children if they noticed anything similar about the words. Watch the video a second time pausing after the describing word.
    2. Point out the words that end in y. Remind them that y can say e just like in some of our names. Give examples: Kathy, Katy, Molly, Brady…..
    3. These words are adjectives. They tell more detail about the noun- person, place, thing or animal. They actually describe it.
    4. The teacher will direct attention to the sentence strips. Have the students take turns highlighting the y at the end of the words.
    5. Help the children come up with a word bank to describe winter using the y at the end of the word. Brainstorm as a class and write them on the board. Continue until you have finished all four seasons.
    6. Give the children a worksheet with the heading of the four seasons. The child should write at least one describing word for each season.
    7. The teacher will need to collect the writing to be used for the following project.


    Day 2
    1. Talk about some of the changes in the seasons. What did you notice about the weather and the trees in the video?
    2. Today we are going to make a collage using trees to show the four seasons.
    3. Show a sample that you have made and talk about how the trees look different for each season.
    4. Pass out the supplies they will need to make the project.
    5. Show the children how the paper is folded into four sections. There is one for each tree. Glue a trunk onto each section.
    6. Next glue the two brown hands on first, then the green hand and finally the yellow hand.
    7. The first tree is finished. Go to the second tree and glue on small pieces of the pink cotton ball. That tree is complete.
    8. The third tree is the summer tree and should have four red pompoms on them.
    9. Tear small pieces of red, brown and orange paper to place on the last hand.

    Culminating Activity

    1. Pass out the handwriting sheets from the previous day and glue to the bottom of the paper.
    2. If time share their projects with a partner reading the descriptive words they chose for each season.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    Technology:
  • Use a drawing program to draw the various seasons.


  • Math:
  • Collect leaves when you are outside and count how many they have. Find a friend and add your leaves together.
  • Use your calendar and dress your weather bear and graph the weather for each day of the month. Compare the months throughout the year.


  • Social Studies:
  • Look at winter in a southern state such as Texas. Does it look the same as it does in Minnesota? Compare and contrast the differences in both states.
  • Community Connections

    When discussing the weather in the morning talk about words that would describe what it was like at their home this morning.

    ND Studies

    Lesson Plan: What Causes Shadows? G K

    Written By: Peggy Greenwaldt
    Grade Level: Kindergarten

    Time Allotment

    Four 30 to 40 minute sessions

    Overview

    In the field activities and exploring in the learning center students will investigate shadow and realize that the sun is a source of light. Students will go outside on a sunny day to find and make shadows and conclude that the sun is a source of light.

    Lesson Plan - Shadow_Lesson_Plan.doc

    Subject Matter

    Earth Science

    Learning Objectives

    This activity is designed so that students will use critical thinking skills and observations to experience shadows and learn that the sun is a source of light. Students will make observations, record data, analyze the data, and express their understanding of the sun as a source of light by drawing and writing in their science journals, completing/creating a data sheet and sharing results.

    Vocabulary:
  • Shadow
  • Sun
  • Source
  • Observation
  • Media Components - Video/Web

    1. Feature Book
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355730
      A clip from the full video: My Shadow
      Series: Reading Rainbow
      Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
      Run Time: [02:11]
      My Shadow: This is an illustrated version of the poem in which a child describes her relationship with her shadow.
      ©2004, Reading Rainbow.
    2. What is Light?
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355729
      A clip from the full video: My Shadow
      Series: Reading Rainbow
      Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
      Run Time: [04:05]
      Kids on the street tell what they think light is. An animation explains the scientific properties of light. LeVar shows how his hand and objects block the light and create shadow.
      ©2004, Reading Rainbow.
    3. Meet Sonny Fontana
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355731
      A clip from the full video: My Shadow
      Series: Reading Rainbow
      Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
      Run Time: [05:20]
      LeVar introduces us to Sonny Fontana from Venezuela as he shows how he creates shadow figures.
      ©2004, Reading Rainbow.
    4. Cambodian Culture
      http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=479173
      A clip from the full video: Shadows and Shapes: Cambodia
      Series: World of Wonders III
      Refine your search:
      Tags
      Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5, 6-8
      Run Time: [06:51]
      While Cari is in Cambodia she visits a jungle temple and a shadow theater.
      ©2009, Genuine World Productions.

    Materials

  • Access to Learn360 so video clips can be used.
  • Computer or presentation system to show video clips.


  • Materials needed for field activities:
  • Science journal
  • Pencil
  • Classroom manipulative
  • Shadow data sheet


  • Materials needed for learning center:
  • Flashlights
  • Overhead projector
  • Classroom manipulatives/supplies
  • Animal shapes cut from card stock
  • Aattached to craft sticks
  • Teacher Preparation

    Preview the video clips that will be used during the lesson.
    When using the Cambodian Culture video clip the part about shadows begins at the 3-minute mark and concludes at the 5 minute 20 second mark.
    Practice making the shadow figures that are shown in the Sonny Fontana video clip.

    Common areas of confusion may include that all light, natural and artificial, can cause shadows to be formed. When doing the activity on day two and if the students are assigned to complete the data sheet at night, it may be best to have students take home a separate piece of paper that is labeled night as some students may not bring the data sheet back. I have not done shadows in my kindergarten classroom in the past and am looking forward to adding it to my earth science curriculum.

    Assessment:
    Assessment can be done during the activities by assessing the student’s ability to share and answer questions.
    In their science journals have the students draw and write about the sun as a source of light.

    Introductory Activities

    MATERIALS:
  • Science Journal
  • Pencils
  • Crayons


  • Observation and Exploration of Shadows
  • Before taking students outside on a sunny day discuss why the sun is important. (It provides heat and light)
  • Tell the class that they will be learning about shadows.
  • Have them look for shadows in the classroom.
  • Have the students get their science journals and draw a picture with a shadow.
  • Have them write the date on the drawing and write shadow on the page.
  • Learning Activities

    Activity 1
    1. Take students outside to a grassy area on a sunny day.
    2. Have the students look at their shadow.
    3. After a few minutes have the students sit in a circle and share their observations about their shadow.
    4. Have the students go to various areas of the school.
    5. Have them look for things that are making a shadow.
    6. Find the biggest shadow, smallest shadow, a fat shadow, a skinny shadow, two shadows that are touching, ect., in the area.
    7. Ask:
      1. How come some shadows are big and some are small?
      2. Does everything make a shadow?
      3. When standing up and looking at your shadow, where is your shadow attached to you? (At your feet or whatever part is touching the ground)
    8. Take the students to a shaded area where they are under the shade of a tree or building and ask them to make observations about shadows.
    9. After a few minutes of exploration have the students come to the circle.
    10. Have students share their observations.
    11. Ask:
      1. Where is our shadow now?
      2. What is needed to make a shadow?
      3. When do we ‘use’ a shadow?
    12. Back in the classroom watch the shadow theater section of the video begins at the 3-minute mark and concludes at the 5 minute 20 second mark.
    13. While watching the video clip have the students watch for:
      1. How they are using the shadow to tell a story?
      2. What equipment is used at the shadow theater?


    Cambodian Culture
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=479173
    A clip from the full video: Shadows and Shapes: Cambodia
    Series: World of Wonders III
    Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5, 6-8
    Run Time: [06:51]
    While Cari is in Cambodia she visits a jungle temple and a shadow theater.
    ©2009, Genuine World Productions.

    Extension: Have students make their shadow into different letter shapes and numbers.

    Activity 2
    1. What do we need to be able to see a shadow?
    2. Students will go out on an overcast day and be able to state why they cannot see their shadow as they did on the sunny day.
    3. How much light is needed from the sun to be able to see our shadow?
    4. Backs in the classroom watch the video clip: What is Light?
    5. Have the students watch for:
      1. What is needed to make a shadow?
      2. What happens when something gets in the way of light?
      3. How can you make a shadow bigger and smaller?
      4. How do people use shadows?


    What is Light?
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355729
    A clip from the full video: My Shadow
    Series: Reading Rainbow
    Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
    Run Time: [04:05]
    Kids on the street tell what they think light is. An animation explains the scientific properties of light. LeVar shows how his hand and objects block the light and create shadow.
    ©2004, Reading Rainbow.

    Culminating Activity

    Materials needed for field activities:
  • Science journal
  • Pencil
  • Classroom manipulative
  • Shadow data sheet


  • Activity 3
    Students will go outside at various times of the day to draw the shadow of the manipulative they selected.

    Procedure:
    1. Have students select a classroom manipulative that is no larger than their hand.
    2. Show the class the shadow data sheet and how to record their observations.
    3. The data sheet is a piece of white construction paper that is divide in half on each side and then numbered 1, 2, 3 and 4. The teacher will supply the question: What do we need to be able to see a shadow? This will be pasted onto the data sheet. In box number one have the student write morning, box two write noon, box three write after noon and box four write night. While outside make sure the students are placing their paper in the same spot.
    4. Take the students outside as early in the school day as possible, around noon and just before going home.
    5. Have students place their manipulative in the boxes at the various times of day.
    6. Have the students draw the shadow of the manipulative.
    7. For box four, night, take the students into a dark room and have this room represent night or send the data sheet and a note home to parents explaining that the students need to go outside in a dark area and draw the shadow of the manipulative before going to bed.
    8. This areas should not be near a man-made light source and that the objective of the lesson is to learn that the sun is a source of light. (A night with no or little moonlight would be best)
    9. The next day during science have the students share their shadow drawings and share what they learned by using the sentence.
      I claim that _______________________ because ___________________________.
      Example: I claim that the sun is a source of light because when sunlight is blocked by an object a shadow is cast and at night there are no shadows.
    10. Students fold and glue or tape the data sheet into their science journal.

    Cross-Curricular Activity

    MATERIALS:
  • Access to Learn360 so video clips can be used.
  • Computer or presentation system to show video clips.


  • Watch the video clip:
    Feature Book - My Shadow by Robert Louis Stevenson
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355730
    A clip from the full video: My Shadow
    Series: Reading Rainbow
    Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
    Run Time: [02:11]
    My Shadow: This is an illustrated version of the poem in which a child describes her relationship with her shadow.
    ©2004, Reading Rainbow.

    While watching the video have the students listen for:
    1. Rhyming words
    2. Why does a shadow stick close?
    3. Why do you think the author included, “my lazy little shadow” in the poem?


    Books about Shadows that could be read:
  • Bear Shadow by Frank Asch
  • It’s Groundhog Day by Steven Kroll
  • Me and My Shadow by Arthur Dorrous
  • Community Connections

    An art project:
    1. Using an overhead projector as the light source, making a shadow silhouette of each student’s head.
    2. Trace the shadowed outline of the student’s head onto black construction paper, cut out and glue onto white construction paper.


    Learning Center: Materials:
  • Flashlights
  • Classroom manipulatives/supplies
  • Overhead projector
  • Animal shapes cut from card stock
  • Attached to craft sticks.


  • At the learning center:
    1. Encourage students to make different sizes of shadows with the same object.
    2. Place items on the overhead and have a friend identify the object by the shadow.
    3. Make shadow shapes using their hands and body.
    4. Students can share their discoveries.


    Watch the video clip:
    Meet Sonny Fontana
    http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?ID=355731
    A clip from the full video: My Shadow
    Series: Reading Rainbow
    Grade(s): Pre K - 2, 3-5
    Run Time: [05:20]
    LeVar introduces us to Sonny Fontana from Venezuela as he shows how he creates shadow figures.
    ©2004, Reading Rainbow.

    Have students watch for:
    1. What figures does Sonny Fontana create?
    2. What body parts does Sonny Fontana use to create the shadow figures?
    3. How do you hold your hands to create a figure?

    Using the overhead or flashlights have students create shadow figures. If time permits have students tell a story using shadow figures.

    STUDENT MATERIALS:
    Student materials and directions for use are included within the learning activities.

    ND Studies